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Old Sunday 8th May 2011, 10:30   #1
Mark Harper
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St. Lucia and Trinidad

When looking at organising a weeks break to Trinidad, we considered going to Tobago for a couple of days, but the number of species found there but absent or more difficult on Trinidad that would be lifers was only three. Once I found out that the BA flight from Gatwick to Trinidad stopped at St. Lucia it was an easy decision to have a couple of days there looking for St. Lucia and Lesser Antillean endemics. Motmot Travel organised the whole trip including arranging for a guide (Adams Toussaint) on St. Lucia for us.

Looking back at the trip now the only change to the itinerary I would have made would have been to stayed one or two nights at Grande Riviere on Trinidad, where per David Ramlal the Trinidad Piping-Guan is practically guaranteed and the birding is generally excellent.

28 April

Arrived in St Lucia early afternoon and it had just stopped raining, we were through the airport in 30 minutes and the taxi that had been organised for us was ready and waiting, along with Eared Doves and Carib Grackles in the car park. It was a 45 minute drive to the La Haut Resort along winding roads, plenty of Grey Kingbirds on the wires and a Broad-winged Hawk were the only birds of note.

Whilst checking in Purple-throated Carib, Bananaquit and Black-faced Grassquit were all seen, unfortunately it also started to rain. Headed down to the rooms and the rain got heavier so the rest of the afternoon was spent birding from the balcony that overlooked the Pitons.

Lesser Antillean Bullfinches were common and an Antillean Crested Hummingbird kept returning to the same perch. Purple-throated Carib was also joined on the list by a Green-throated Carib to complete the hummingbirds available. Hirnudines and Swifts were brought close on the front of a passing shower, enabling us to identify them as Caribbean Martin's and both Black and Lesser Antillean Swift.

Scaly-breasted Thrasher, Lesser Antillean Saltator and Scaly-naped Pigeon were all lifers seen from the balcony before it got too dark to bird. A total of 9 lifers in a few hours, far more than we could have got by visiting Tobago.


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Old Sunday 8th May 2011, 14:36   #2
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29 April

We had spoken with Adams the night before and arranged to be collected at 5.30am, it had rained most of the night and when Adams arrived 20 minutes late he told us that he had had to cross several landslides on the way. Our first birding stop was to be 10 to 15 minutes up the road to Castries from our hotel where we birded a track opposite the turn-off to Bouton. On the way we had to cross a landslide that had killed 7 people six months earlier and where overnight further mud had covered half the road.

A Black-whiskered Vireo flitted about where we parked the car and Adams pished in a St. Lucia Warbler and the first of many Grey Tremblers put in an appearance. Walking along the track it started to rain on and off and umbrellas were going up and down every five minutes. Plenty of Lesser Antillean Bullfinches, but we couldn't get a St. Lucia Black Finch to respond. Caribbean Elaenia and Lesser Antillean Pewee were also easily found as they called, but we never heard a Rufous-throated Solitaire and Adams believed that they were now nesting and hence not responding.

A quick blast of the tape brought in a Mangrove Cuckoo that just sat in the open within 3 metres of us, rather different from my previous experience of these in Florida. A couple of St Lucia Parrots flew over, but in the wet and cloudy conditions they were little more than grey shapes.

We next walked down the road to Bouton, where we saw plenty more of the same species. Adams glimpsed an endangered St. Lucia Black Finch, which then went on to give a super show of this elusive and difficult to find bird. A Lesser Antillean Flycatcher was called in and a St. Lucia Oriole was also found, before we walked back towards the car looking for better views of St. Lucia Parrots. Eventually we were able to find one perched although distantly and a Pearly-eyed Thrasher was noted in the same tree.

By 9.30am the rain was torrential and it was a two hour drive to the opposite side of the island for the other key bird we were after, the White-breasted Thrasher, and with the risk of landslides increasing. Adams called a friend on the other side of the island who said that it had been raining there solidly for 2 hours, so witwe decided to call it a day and headed back to the hotel. As it turned out this was a wise decision, as the rain remained torrential until 3.00pm. Hence the rest of the day was spent on the balcony adding Zenaida Dove and Spectacled Thrush to the list.

30 April

The weather was much better today, but we only had a few hours before our flight to Trinidad, so we walked up the road to where we had birded the previous day, not walking too quickly it only took an hour. We still could not find any Rufous-throated Solitaires, but did get much better views of St. Lucia Parrot's and Pearly-eyed Thrashers, before heading back to the hotel and our transfer to Vieux-Fort airport.

From the departure lounge we were able to make out 4 distant Red-billed Tropicbirds flying along the cliffs the far side of the runway, we had hoped to have gone to see these up close the previous day, but had to make do with this sighting.

Our flight to Trinidad was on time and we arrived about 3.45pm, we were quickly through the airport, but there was no sign of anyone from Asa Wright Centre to meet us. Having got some money changed I gave them a call and they apologised saying that they had our booking, but had not noted down that we required a transfer, so told us to catch a taxi. Along the way we saw a few common birds, such as Ruddy Ground-Dove, Orange-winged Parrot, Great Kiskadee and Tropical Kingbird. It took about 45 minutes to Asa Wright Centre and they came out and paid the taxi driver when we got there.

We quickly dumped our bags in the rooms and headed down to the veranda, passing the Crested Oropendola colony on the way, where we were soon adding White-necked Jacobin, Blue-chinned Sapphire and White-chested Emerald to our hummingbird trip list. The recently split endemic Trinidad Motmot visited one of the bird tables, whilst a Northern Waterthrush fed below it.

There were several Palm Tanagers nesting on the veranda and one behind a painting in the room afternoon tea is served. White-lined and Silver-beaked Tanagers were also common, but tended to stay outside with the Green Honeycreeper, Blue Dacnis and Violaceous Euphonia.

Rum punch was served on the veranda at 6.00pm, so we had this and dashed to the rooms for a quick shower and back in time for dinner at 7.00pm. There were only about 12 of us staying there and this was boosted by a few Trinidadian tourists as it was a weekend. The food was buffet service and generally good for the whole stay. We headed to bed looking forward to what the next day would bring.
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Old Sunday 8th May 2011, 16:18   #3
njlarsen
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Its a pity you did not get the white-breasted thrasher. It has been unseasonally wet here in Dominica as well this year. Did you get the scaly-br trasher and the local house wren?

Looking forward to the rest of your story!

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Old Sunday 8th May 2011, 17:10   #4
Mark Harper
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Originally Posted by njlarsen View Post
Its a pity you did not get the white-breasted thrasher. It has been unseasonally wet here in Dominica as well this year. Did you get the scaly-br trasher and the local house wren?

Looking forward to the rest of your story!

Niels
I was disappointed not to get to even try for the White-breasted Thrasher, but really enjoyed my time on the island anyway. Scaly-breasted Thrashers were very common, but apparently I would have needed to make the trip around to the east side of the island for the House Wren and the Rufous Nightjar, gives me an excuse to go back.
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Old Sunday 8th May 2011, 17:47   #5
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I did not see the house wren either when I visited, but was told it is common in the Pitons park.

When you come back to the Caribbean, there are a couple of islands north of St Lucia also worth visiting (hint hint )

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Old Sunday 8th May 2011, 19:17   #6
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A few photos from St Lucia. Only included the St Lucia Black Finch due to rarity value and not photo quality, there are photos of Black-faced Grassquit purporting to be the Black Finch on the web.
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Old Sunday 8th May 2011, 20:40   #7
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Rare indeed! We do not have a picture of StL BF in Opus, can I use yours?

Niels
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Old Monday 9th May 2011, 07:37   #8
Mark Harper
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Rare indeed! We do not have a picture of StL BF in Opus, can I use yours?

Niels
Of course you can.
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Old Monday 9th May 2011, 18:14   #9
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1st May

We were on the veranda before 6.00am, coffee in hand adding new species up until breakfast at 7.30am. Scaled Pigeon, Channel-billed Toucan and Black-tailed Tityra were seen perched distantly, whilst the loud call of the Bearded Bellbird was ever present but unseen. To the hummmingbird list of yesterday we added Black-throated Mango, Copper-rumped Hummingbird and my most wanted specie the Tufted Coquette. Purple Honeycreepers also took advantage of the hummingbird feeders.

A Forest Elaenia perched in the tree a few feet off the veranda, looking a little different to the illustration in the field guide, but its call removed any doubt. Barred Antshrikes built an next just below the veranda whilst Cocoa Thrushes competed for food on the bird tables. All this before tucking into breakfast of fruit, cereal, toast and eggs done however you wanted them.

We were down for the 8.30am orientation walk, but before this we just had time to organise the trips we had booked for the rest of the week. We had pre-booked trips to Caroni and Nariva Swamps and the Blanchiseusse Road plus the Oilbird excursion was included as we were staying at the Centre. We were asked which days we would like to go and as there was three of us they would just arrange a private guide for us. The trips are each around $150 for three people and and extra $40 for each extra person and can be booked on arrival.

Back on the veranda we met Harold who was taking us and four others on a short walk along the Discovery Trail. As well as knowing the birds the guides are fairly clued up on the other wildlife to be seen on the property. We had barely walked 50 metres before a Green-backed (White-tailed) Trogon was found perched over the trail, occasionally dropping to the ground after whatever it was feeding on. A drumming Woodpeckler on nearby bamboo was soon located and proved to be a Lineated, this spot however was a prime site for Chestnut Woodpecker, which seemed to turn up daily, except when we were there.

It soon started raining and whilst we took shelter, two of the others on the walk headed back to the veranda. When it eased off we moved on the the Golden-headed Mankin lek where at least 8 males could be seen, although they were not active in the damp conditions. Barely 30 metres further along the track was a White-bearded Manakin lek with at least 6 males on show, but again sitting quietly.

Opposite the lek was the Chaconia Trail, which we headed along for 50 metres to look for a roosting Common Potoo, we had by this time lost the other two participants on the walk. The Potoo put on a fine show, well it sat in full view doing nothing, as it would nearly everyday, although I did see it stretch its neck once. Back to the Discovery Trail and on to look for Bearded Bellbird, but torrential rain saw us heading back to the veranda early.

30 minutes later and it had cleared up so we headed back down on our own and in the improved conditions were able to photograph the Manakins and Potoo. Searching for the Bearded Bellbird took some time even though we could hear 3 or 4 very close they remained in the canopy just appearing in flight, until we eventually found one perched up in full view. Well satisfied we headed back with a quick detour down the Bellbird Trail where we saw a Red-crowned Ant-Tanager.

After lunch more time on the veranda produced several Common Black-Hawks. a pair of Grey-headed Kites and a distant White Hawk, we had to wait until our final morning for a close view of the White Hawk. Swifts were represented by Band-rumped and Grey-rumped. A Grey-fronted Dove put in an appearance under the bird tables and a Golden-olive Woodpecker showed in what seemed to be his favourite tree, as he was there most days.

Whilst alot of people just remained on the veranda there was so much more to see by getting out for a walk so the rest of the afternoon was spent along the entrance road. A Cocoa Woodcreeper sang constantly from the same patch of bamboo for the entire week and could be seen most times we passed. Zone-tailed and Short-tailed Hawks were also seen overhead. Rufous-breasted Wrens sang from roadside tangles, White-necked, Cocoa and Spectacled Thrushes fed along the road. Streaked Flycatcher and Tropical Pewees both had favourite spots where they could be guaranteed. With the exception of the Rufous-breasted Wren all of these species were seen from the veranda as well, but only once or twice in a week, whereas they were regular along the entrance road.
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Old Monday 9th May 2011, 20:27   #10
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Great report Mark, nice one
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Old Monday 9th May 2011, 21:00   #11
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Of course you can.
Thanks Mark, now uploaded

Niels

Edit: if you got a decent pic of the forest elaenia, then we would be interested in that one as well. We only have a crappy picture as is (I can say that, I took it!).
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Old Tuesday 10th May 2011, 17:58   #12
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Edit: if you got a decent pic of the forest elaenia, then we would be interested in that one as well. We only have a crappy picture as is (I can say that, I took it!).
"Decent" might be stretching it, but I do have a photo you can use.
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Old Tuesday 10th May 2011, 18:55   #13
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May 2nd

Early morning was again spent on the veranda enjoying a lot of the same species as the previous day. After breakfast we were down to visit Dunstan Cave, which is actually a narrow gorge, a mile or so walk from the centre. There were just the three of us and a guide from the centre who pointed out Owl Butterflies and Trapdoor Spiders along the way. Unfortunately or fortunately depending on your point of view we were unable to find any Fer-de-lance snakes, which are common and two days previously there had been one in the entrance to the cave.

The real reason for visiting the cave on one of my main reasons for visiting Trinidad was to see Oilbirds and we were not to be disappointed, with close views of at least 20 of the 180 birds in the cave. I had read about strict time limits of 2 minutes in the cave, but as there was only three of us we were able to spend slightly longer and gets some photos, but still using long exposures as flashes are not allowed.

On the walk back we heard a Grey-throated Leaftosser calling, but it did not respond, so we would leave that for another time. The trail down to the Oilbird cave, where we heard the Leaftosser, is marked with a no entry sign, but we asked the Manager who said there was no problem with us exploring this on our own, as long as we did not go down to the cave. We were however slightly put off by this trail being one of the best places to see Fer-de-lances, and the following day two were seen along here.

With some time to ourselves we spent more time on the entrance road and Discovery Trail adding Guianan (Violaceous) Trogon, Great Antshrike, White-flanked Antwren, Tropical Parula, Bay-headed Tanager, Boat-billed, Yellow-olive and Yellow-breasted Flycatchers to the list.

At 1.30pm we headed off on our first excursion away from the centre to Caroni swamp. Our guide for this trip was Roodal Ramlal, so we gave him our target list, which consisted of only two species and set off.

Our first stop was at some sewage ponds, unless you count the Grey Hawk we saw within a mile of the centre. Unfortunately the sewage onds are locked up so we had to peer through the fence, but it did not stop us seeing a cracking male Long-winged Harrier, Southern Lapwings, Wattled Jacana, Eared Dove, several species of hirundine and a few Yellow-headed Blackbirds.

Arriving at Caroni Roodal took us to a flowering tree, which we staked out for the first of our target birds and eventually we got good views of a male Green-throated Mango. At 4pm we boarded the boat for our ride through the swamp, but not before we had loaded up with a flask of juice, one of water, another of ice and a cool box with cakes and rum punch sent by the centre. Fortunately they had also sent plenty of cups so that when we came to drink it we could share with the other 6 people on the boat.

Within the first 5 minutes on the boat we had a Scarlet Ibis fly over and they became regular sights as they passed over in flocks to their breeding islands. At the time of year we were there they tend not to go to the roosting islands in any numbers, so watching them fly over is what to expect, although we saw about 10 perched.

Within the mangroves the boatguide pointed out several Cook's Tree Boas, as well as teaching us the difference between various mangrove species. It was the birds we were really after and we soon had nice views of a Straight-billed Woodcreeper. What we were really after was Bicoloured Conebill and eventually the guide heard one and we set off in pursuit, eventually pishing them in for good views, not sure that the other general tourists appreciated them quite as mush as us.

With our second target in the bag we could enjoy the experience and add a host of herons and a few waders to the trip list. On the way back to dock we stopped to view a Common Potoo. We arrived back at the lodge just after 7.30pm and headed straight in for dinner.
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Old Wednesday 11th May 2011, 18:19   #14
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3rd May

Before breakfast we checked out a territory of Grey-throated Leaftosser along the entrance road, it was supposed to be nesting in the bank alongside the road and could sometimes be seen on the road, but there was no sign of it. A great consolation prize was a Black-faced Antthrush that walked within 2 metres of me as I waited for the Leaftosser.

We had a day trip booked to explore the Blanchisseuse Road and David Ramlal was to be our guide for the day. We had a list of around half a dozen species to target, excluding Trinidad Piping-Guan and Scaled Antpitta, which David soon told us we had next to no chance of along the Blanchisseuse Road. The Piping-Guan only really being possible when a particular tree is fruiting and it being over a year since he had last heard a Scaled Antpitta there.

Having specific species to target meant that we were after quality and not quantity and another group of birders from Texas recorded two more species along the road than us that day, but only saw two of our target species.

First stop was to look for White-bellied Antbird, no response at the first spot, but a Green Hermit buzzed us and a Golden-crowned Warbler sang nearby. We then headed for Las Lapas Ridge, walking the dirt road we soon found our first target Golden-fronted Greenlet, we had previously heard these at Asa Wright, but had only glimpsed movement, this time we had excellent views.

Further along the road David pointed out several Grey-throated Leaftosser nest holes, the third of these had a Leaftosser looking out. David warned us not to get too close as they exit rather rapidly and he knew someone that had suffered an eye injury as a result. As we watched the bird shot out and disappeared into the forest.

Slaty-capped and Dusky-capped Flycatchers were both added before we turned around and walked back. As we approached the Leaftosser nest hole it again shot out, but this time we were able to locate it in the forest and I was able to get one decent photo, before it dropped out of sight.

Before getting back to the vehicle David heard another of our targets Speckled Tanager and a bit of pishing was rewarded with a couple of birds in with a group of Bay-headed Tanagers, whilst a pair of Swallow Tanagers sat nearby. A Sooty Grassquit was also singing nearby so we added him to the list before continuing on our way.

At David's next site for White-bellied Antbird we found the forementioned group of Texans trying to tape in a Guianan Trogon, which was singing and in full view next to where we parked, so we called them over to see it. Whilst watching this and a Steaked Xenops David started to play for the Antbird and it soon responded, fortunately the Texans moved on at this point as it would have been difficult to get 15 people onto the bird. We were soon enjoying good views of a pair of Antbirds, as they moved across the slope above us.

Walking along the road a brief view of the next target, a Stripe-breasted Spinetail, was most unsatisfactory as it disappeared as soon as it was found. Fortunately I only had to wait 15 minutes before one showed perfectly.

It was now time for lunch and we stopped along a road side where there was a small table in a thatched shelter. It is not very often on birding trips that the picnic lunch provided involves proper plates, cuttlery and even a table cloth, not to mention chicken pilaf and salad. As we ate lunch the Magnificent Frigatebirds were joined in the air by a Plumbeous Kite and a Short-tailed Hawk.

We only had one real target left Trinidad Euphonia and it proved to be a real pain, we could hear one calling from where we ate lunch, but after an hour or so, all we had seen was a brief perched view and a couple of flyovers. Even trying Ferruginous Pygmy-Owl called did not work, although it did help add the only Owl to the trip list, plus Plain Antvireo and Long-billed Gnatwren.

Eventually we conceded defeat and started the journey back up the hill towards Asa Wright Centre. A stop at a spot for Rufous-tailed Jacamar was successful and a little higher up David stopped by a tree covered in mistletoe, this being the favourite food of Trinidad Euphonia. A little pishing and we were soon enjoying a male Trinidad Euphonia alongside a couple of Violaceous Euphonias. We could now return to the centre with all our targets birds in the bag.

One bird that I had not seen mentioned in many trip reports before I went was Short-tailed Nighthawk, but David said it was fairly reliable just before dusk from the veranda or the carpark at the centre. So rather than sitting around chatting with our rum punch we sat watching the skies and sure enough at 6.30pm one flew right past the veranda, the following day it did exactly the same at 6.27pm, with only us to enjoy it.
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Old Thursday 12th May 2011, 18:25   #15
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4th May

We had planned for this day to be an opportunity to catch up with anything we were still missing around Asa Wright Centre, fortunately we had been so successful we had nothing really to target except Bright-rumped Attila. We grilled the guides on the best place to see one of these and all we got was where they had recently heard them and that dawn was the best time. Well I had heard one myself the previous evening from the veranda, so we started on the Chaconia Trail as that was the direction it been singing from. Not a sound from the Attila, but a Stripe-breasted Spinetail showed really well.

After breakfast we wandered the entrance road and some trails, but did not add anything to the list apart from Ochre-bellied Flycatcher that I had somehow managed to avoid looking at on previous days, whenever there had been one from the veranda.

In the afternoon I decided to spend some time, about four hours, studying swifts. I could not turn any into Chapman's but did manage five other species. Grey-rumped and Band-tailed were common, but I also managed to pick out 4 Lesser Swallow-tailed, 1 Short-tailed and upto 10 Chestnut-collared Swifts, which first appeared on the front of a rain shower and then stuck around.

Having seen the Short-tailed Nighthawk again, we decided to head out on a night walk along the entrance road after dinner. The regular Trinidad Chevron Tarantula was on the back of the car park sign and a Pink-toed Tarantula was on a wall. Having seen plenty of bats we turned around and walked back, as we passed the Motmot Trail we heard something large moving in the leaf litter, the spotlight then picked out the back end of a fairly large animal moving slowly up the bank into the trees. Studying the options later, the pale colour and long tail led me to the conclusion that it was most probably a Southern Tamandua Anteater.
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Old Friday 13th May 2011, 19:10   #16
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5th May

Another day trip this time with Roodal Ramlal and heading south east to Nariva Swamp. First stop was at Aripo Livestock Station and almost the first bird was one of our targets Green-rumped Parrotlet, with several that were nesting along the entrance road.

Our other target for here, Ruddy-breasted Seedeater, proved much more difficult and in the end we left empty handed, but we did see a few nice birds whilst we searched. Savannah Hawks perched prominently on the dead trees, Pied Water-Tyrants and White-headed Marsh Tyrants were around the pools and Yellow-chinned Spinetails were rattling from the shrubs. Blue-black Grassquits were numerous and actively displaying, whilst a few localised Grassland Yellow-Finches tried to avoid detection by walking into longer grass. A dash of colour was added by Red-breasted and Yellow-headed Blackbirds and grace by Fork-tailed Flycatchers swooping from perch to perch. All in all not a bad way to spend and hour or so.

Heading off to Nariva we first stopped at Waller Airfield to get permission to return later in the day. Although not normally included on the day trip to Nariva, there were several birds we wanted to see there and Roodal was ameniable to leaving Nariva early to do this. It rained most of the way to the coast, but when we eventually hit the coast it stopped.

A couple of our target birds were mangrove specialities so we stopped in an area with mangroves on both sides of the road, that Roodal said was good for both our targets. His local knowledge was spot on, as within 5 minutes we had seen 3 Silvered Antbirds and 3 Black-crested Antshrikes, plus a couple of Bicoloured Conebills.

Driving south along the coast road you have a marshy area to the right and we chanced upon a Limpkin in flight, which dropped out of sight as soon as we saw it. Fortunately a couple of minutes later it flew up and perched on top of a bush for a couple of minutes afording great views.

We stopped for lunch down by the beach, but seawatching was not very productive, only Laughing Gulls, Magnificent Frigatebirds and Brown Pelicans to show for our efforts. A fly over Northern Crested Caracara provided a good comparison with the nearby perched Yellow-headed Caracara.

Moving into the Nariva swamp area I was surprised by how much of it was under cultivation and the fact that so many people were living there. Our target Pinnated Bittern was going to prove harder than I had anticipated. The approach to birding was walking and scanning from the road hoping to pick out a head and neck stuck out of the grass. Before we were able to find a Bittern Roodal came up with another of our targets a White-tailed Goldenthroat.

When we eventually spotted a Pinnated Bittern it was a bittersweet moment, as the only reason we saw it was that it had a damaged right wing and when it walked bent over this stuck up like a sail from the grass. When it stood still in the grass you realised quite how easy it would have been to miss it and brought home to us that everyone else we spoke to at Asa Wright had missed it on their Nariva trips.

We had a short time looking for Azure Gallinules and Stripe-backed Bitterns more in hope than expectations, before we left for Waller Airfield. When we arrived at the Airfield two of the girls from security decided they wanted to come with us to see what birdwatching was about, so they hopped in the minibus and off we set.

Moriche Avenue was our destination, because as the name suggests this is where the Moriche Palms are and the birds we were looking for specialise in these. First up was Sulphury Flycathcher and several were calling as we got out of the van and it did not take long to see one. A couple of Red-bellied Macaws could be heard and we scoped these to the delight of the security girls, later flocks of 30 or more arrived.

A brief shower made us return to the van, but also gave us time to drink the rum punch that Asa Wrigth Centre staff had packed for us, as we would not be back for 6pm drinks on the veranda. As soon as the rain stopped we were back out and a Ruby-topaz Hummingbird put in an apperance. With that we only had one target left and Roodal soon found that for us a Moriche Oriole, (now lumped with Epaulet Oriole by Clements), my 50th lifer of the trip.

Driving back to drop off the security girls we picked up a paid of Plain-breasted Ground-Doves on the old runway. We eventually arrived back at the Centre with enough time to grab a shower before dinner.

6th May

We had to leave just after lunchtime, so spent a relaxing morning on the veranda, which still managed to turn up three new trip birds in the form of Double-toothed Kite, Black Hawk-Eagle and a Squirrel Cuckoo. We were at the airport in plenty of time to do a final day checklist and look back fondly on our trip.
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Old Monday 16th May 2011, 02:08   #17
njlarsen
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Mark,
thanks for sharing!

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Old Saturday 21st May 2011, 01:11   #18
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Mark, it took me a little time, but the Forest Elaenia pic now uploaded to Opus, thanks

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Old Wednesday 29th June 2011, 17:12   #19
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Great report Mark. Sounds like a very successful trip!
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Old Wednesday 29th June 2011, 18:14   #20
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Yup, good stuff, I like the idea of St Lucia first. We did Grand Riviere, and yes the Piping Guan was relatively easy there (see my Avatar!) Still missed lots so a second trip is perhaps on the cards....
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Old Thursday 30th June 2011, 03:07   #21
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A nice report Mark - missed it first time around.

Asa Wright Centre sounds amazing - if I ever get out that way . . .

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Old Thursday 30th June 2011, 07:47   #22
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Glad you enjoyed the report, depsite the weather I was really glad I did St Lucia for the extra species on offer, instead of Tobago .
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