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Old Friday 27th April 2012, 12:04   #26
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Saitoh et al 2012

Saitoh, Nishiumi, Shigeta & Ueda 2012. Re-examination of the taxonomy of the Arctic Warbler Phylloscopus borealis (Blasius): three separate species within the Phylloscopus [borealis] superspecies. Jpn J Ornithol 61(1): 46–59. [abstract] [pdf]

PS. Alström et al 2011.
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Old Saturday 28th April 2012, 15:06   #27
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Thanks for this Richard, very interesting findings. I eagerly await the first record of Kamchatka Leaf Warbler for the Western Palearctic, most likely with a mistnet and some recording equipment! Unfortunately no recordings on Xeno Canto yet, hopefully this will be amended shortly.
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Old Sunday 29th April 2012, 08:14   #28
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Is anything known about the respective wintering ranges of these three species or are all 'Arctic Warblers' seen in the winter months and on migration only identifiable to superspecies level?

Ian
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Old Sunday 29th April 2012, 10:46   #29
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hi ian,
not really a full answer but according to the alstrom paper they are diagnosable on the wintering grounds by call (and morphology? - field guides i have show xanthodryas as distinctly more yellow below but not sure how useful this is in real life) and they have confirmed occurrence of borealis from the thai-malay peninsula, borneo and the philippines. Examinandus lecotype is from Bali, so probably there is a big overlap in wintering/passage ranges. Both birds of SE Asia and birds of Borneo guides illustrate both borealis and xanthodryas, suggesting both occur.
cheers,
James
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Old Sunday 29th April 2012, 17:56   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ian Lewis View Post
Is anything known about the respective wintering ranges of these three species or are all 'Arctic Warblers' seen in the winter months and on migration only identifiable to superspecies level?
See the wintering ranges in Clement 2006 (HBW 11), but note that here xanthodryas includes examinandus. It suggests that only P borealis sensu stricto winters in mainland SE Asia, but that P borealis and P xanthodryas/examinandus winter in Taiwan, Philippines and Sundas. However, I suspect that relatively few winter records have been conclusively identified to (sub)species.

Last edited by Richard Klim : Sunday 29th April 2012 at 18:25.
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Old Sunday 29th April 2012, 20:07   #31
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Intriguingly, there was an Arctic Warbler with yellow underparts in Scilly in the mid 1980s.
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Old Monday 30th April 2012, 09:07   #32
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Sorry, I did not read it but did the Saitoh et al paper add a lot of new stuff compared to Alstrom et al?
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Old Monday 30th April 2012, 09:37   #33
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Saitoh et al 2012

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Originally Posted by Ben Wielstra View Post
Sorry, I did not read it but did the Saitoh et al paper add a lot of new stuff compared to Alstrom et al?
No, Ben. It seems to be a presentation of the results of Alström et al 2011 for a Japanese readership (and proposes Japanese vernacular names).
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Old Monday 30th April 2012, 20:21   #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Klim View Post
See the wintering ranges in Clement 2006 (HBW 11), but note that here xanthodryas includes examinandus. It suggests that only P borealis sensu stricto winters in mainland SE Asia, but that P borealis and P xanthodryas/examinandus winter in Taiwan, Philippines and Sundas. However, I suspect that relatively few winter records have been conclusively identified to (sub)species.
Thanks for the information,

I have seen undoubted borealis in Siberia and presumed borealis in the UK, but I am unable on the information currently available to identify those birds I saw in the Philippines and the Sundas to species.

Looks like a spring trip to Japan, including northern Hokkaido is required.

Ian
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Old Tuesday 1st May 2012, 01:26   #35
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The situation in Hong Kong (where it is a passage migrant only) may be of interest. In autumn borealis (s.s.) is the only taxon proven to occur. This is based on DNA analysis of trapped birds and the fact that only the 'single' call note is heard in autumn. In spring xanthrodryas predominates (based on singing birds and predominace of 'double' note call) with borelis being much rarer. There are no records as yet of examinandus. This fits with a well established pattern in HK of south-east Asian wintering passerines predominating in autumn and Philippine wintering taxa predominating in spring.
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Old Tuesday 1st May 2012, 14:58   #36
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Saitoh et al 2012

Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Klim View Post
Saitoh, Nishiumi, Shigeta & Ueda 2012. Re-examination of the taxonomy of the Arctic Warbler Phylloscopus borealis (Blasius): three separate species within the Phylloscopus [borealis] superspecies. Jpn J Ornithol 61(1): 46–59.
Revised links on new J-STAGE system (wef 1 May 2012): [abstract] [pdf]
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Old Tuesday 1st May 2012, 15:30   #37
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul Leader View Post
The situation in Hong Kong (where it is a passage migrant only) may be of interest. In autumn borealis (s.s.) is the only taxon proven to occur. This is based on DNA analysis of trapped birds and the fact that only the 'single' call note is heard in autumn. In spring xanthrodryas predominates (based on singing birds and predominace of 'double' note call) with borelis being much rarer. There are no records as yet of examinandus. This fits with a well established pattern in HK of south-east Asian wintering passerines predominating in autumn and Philippine wintering taxa predominating in spring.
Aware of the impending split, I took some brief notes on the "Arctics" in the Phils in winter 2008/2009 and noted yellow suffusions on the birds I saw well at Candaba Marsh, Luzon. However, without any calls or photographs, suspect I am unable to go any further than believing they were likely of one of the two "new" "yellower" species.

cheers, alan
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Old Tuesday 1st May 2012, 16:17   #38
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Alan, I only have 2 video clips with Arctics calling but both seem to be borealis.
Re netted birds, from our Dalton Pass report:
'Arctic Warbler Phylloscopus borealis Four birds were netted and ringed during 17–22 October, two at night and two during the day. All were considered to belong to the same taxon. Judging from measurements and the relatively yellow appearance of the supercilium and underparts, this was possibly P. borealis kennicotti. A few other Phylloscopus warblers thought also to be this species were seen in forest edge or secondary growth around Imugan.'
Round, P. D. & Allen, D. 2010. Nocturnal Captures of birds at Dalton Pass, Luzon, Philippines, October 2009-January 2010. Report to Department of Environment and Natural Resources, Republic of The Philippines. The Wetland Trust, Icklesham, UK. v + 53pp.
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Old Thursday 29th November 2012, 21:29   #39
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Australia

Birding-Aus, 25 Nov 2012...
Quote:
Kamchatka Leaf Warbler (new bird for Oz) and other vagrants off NW WA

Hi All,

Five of us (George Swann, Mike Carter, Ash Herrod, Alistair Stewart and myself) have just returned from a November survey trip to Ashmore Reef and several inshore islands off NW Western Australia.

The birding highlight was Australia's first documented Kamchatka Leaf Warbler Phylloscopus examinandus observed over several days at Ashmore Reef. A series of images and sound recordings of its diagnostic contact call were obtained. Pics of the bird are here:
http://www.pbase.com/wildlifeimages/...a_leaf_warbler

Kamchatka Leaf Warbler is a recent (2008) split from Arctic Warbler Phylloscopus borealis. We were therefore fortunate to also observe and photograph a typical Arctic Warbler within about 50 m of the KL Warbler.
http://www.pbase.com/wildlifeimages/image/147528039

...
Cheers,
Rohan Clarke
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rohan AT wildlifeimages.com.au
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Old Friday 30th November 2012, 17:06   #40
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Quote:
Originally Posted by screaming piha View Post
Intriguingly, there was an Arctic Warbler with yellow underparts in Scilly in the mid 1980s.
I've heard about this bird before from someone who saw it, and it's also mentioned in Vincombe & Cottridge's "Rare Birds in Britain and Ireland: a photographic record" although it's described there merely as flavistic: do you think there could be more to it? Checking the dates in old BB reports, it looks like it was present from 30 Sep to 2 Oct 1986, along with another (presumably normal?) bird.

Update: Bob Flood et al, Essential Guide to Birds of the Isles of Scilly describes it as "an example of flavism with bright yellow pigmentation" (and also gives the location as Newford Duck Pond.

Last edited by StevePreddy : Friday 30th November 2012 at 18:16. Reason: Some more info
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Old Monday 21st October 2013, 12:16   #41
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Vocalisations

Yoshiki Watabe posted some recordings on kantori today...
Quote:
[kantori] Phylloscopus [borealis] superspecies

... I think that colloration and structure of Arctic complex warblers have much variation. And I think that the variation is one of the reason of difficulty of the identification.

I have identified Arctic complex warblers by song and call. I have recorded many song and call of these species in Japan. I uploaded the call and sonogram of these species my following web-sites.

Arctic Warbler on Hegura-jima:
http://outdoor.geocities.jp/phyllon2...ber2011-1.html

Kamchatka Leaf Warbler on Hegura-jima:
http://outdoor.geocities.jp/phyllon2...s2Oct2011.html

Arctic Warbler on Iriomote-jima, Okinawa Prefecture. Some Arctic Warbler winter on the island.
http://outdoor.geocities.jp/phyllon2...mote-jima.html

The call and subsong of Japanese Leaf Warbler at Shirakaba-toge, Matsumoto-shi, Nagano Prefecture. No Japanese Leaf Warbler breeds at Shirakaba-toge.:
http://outdoor.geocities.jp/phyllon2...kaba-toge.html

I hope that my web-site will be help you.

Regards,
Yoshiki Watabe

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
渡部 良樹 Watabe Yoshiki

Phyllonの野鳥博物館
Phyllon's Personal Japanese Wild Bird Museum
http://phylloscopus.web.fc2.com/

Phyllonの自然音博物館
Phyllon's Nature Sound Musium
http://outdoor.geocities.jp/phyllon2000/
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Old Saturday 8th March 2014, 11:24   #42
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Saitoh 2011

Saitoh 2011. Arctic Warbler, Ko-mushikui (Jpn), Phylloscopus borealis; Kamchatka Leaf Warbler, Oh-mushikui (Jpn), P. examinandus; Japanese Leaf Warbler, Meboso-mushikui (Jpn), P. xanthodryas. Bird Research News 8(11): 4–5. [pdf]
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Old Saturday 19th April 2014, 07:35   #43
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Bermuda kennicotti?

Martin Garner & David Cooper, Birding Frontiers, 18 Apr 2014: Bermuda phylloscopus Warbler: Another look.

[Alström et al 2011 concluded that kennicotti is best synonymised with borealis – "Birds from Alaska (kennicotti) had calls that were indistinguishable from continental Eurasian birds (Fig. 6g–h, Supporting Information Table S3)".]

Last edited by Richard Klim : Saturday 19th April 2014 at 08:35.
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Old Thursday 1st May 2014, 08:55   #44
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eBON

Christian Perez, eBON, May 2014: The Arctic Warbler Splits.
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