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Old Tuesday 27th June 2017, 10:30   #1
Elmer Fudd
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Focuser arm broken on Canon 7x35 vintage porro

Unfortunately the focuser arm of my new to me Canon 7x35 porro binos is almost broken. First I reckoginzed that the left eyepiece didn't follow up as well as the right one when turning the focusing wheel and thought of a mechanical problem caused by cheap material but everything on these binos is well build. At a second glance I saw the problem as marked on the picture below.

Presumably Canon does not longer keep replacement parts on stock for this model but can it be fixed with Loctite or something like this?

Do you have any suggestions?
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Old Tuesday 4th July 2017, 10:32   #2
Bencw
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Originally Posted by Elmer Fudd View Post
Unfortunately the focuser arm of my new to me Canon 7x35 porro binos is almost broken. First I reckoginzed that the left eyepiece didn't follow up as well as the right one when turning the focusing wheel and thought of a mechanical problem caused by cheap material but everything on these binos is well build. At a second glance I saw the problem as marked on the picture below.

Presumably Canon does not longer keep replacement parts on stock for this model but can it be fixed with Loctite or something like this?

Do you have any suggestions?
Hi Elmer,

Well, it might be worth contacting Canon as you never know, Zeiss have been able to send me replacements for the very old Oberkochen 8x30B a couple of years back. Nothing lost by asking ?

Glue will not be strong enough, this is a common problem in many vintage Japanese made binoculars, it is found often with the Nikon A featherlight models and I think the cast alloy metal used and designed to be light, is quite brittle. A cause of this is also binoculars being put back in the case without closing the focus right down, the gap between the arms and binocular body means that any impact puts strain on the arms, but if closed up, the body takes it, so no damage. The only other solution I can suggest, which I have done myself with said Nikon, is to keep a look out for a cheap rough binocular of the same make on the auction site being sold spare or repair, that has intact ocular arms. It might take awhile before one comes up though.

Ben
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Old Wednesday 5th July 2017, 08:04   #3
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J-B Weld might work. I have used that quite a bit and it works. I really can not tell by your picture though.
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Old Sunday 9th July 2017, 16:36   #4
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There is a solution, but it is illogical to execute.

Just focusing is enough to negate most adhesives. The only method I have found to work is drilling and tapping for two screws. They can then be buffed, filled, and painted so that no damage is visible. To me, this is much like wrecking the car to turn the radio off and I only did it once, for a fellow with lots of money who was trying to restore an heirloom. It took the better part of a workday and I certainly wouldn’t have started the project without a heavy dose of pleading. In the shop, the repair seemed to work just fine. However, I have no idea how things worked out for the customer in the long run. I think that focusing would have weakened the pot metal arm again.

Possibly your best bet would be to remove the other bridge, remove the EP from it, and draw—accurately—the outline of the part, complete with the hole for the EP and the focus mechanism, then send the drawing to a number freelance repair services that might have a “boneyard.” The boneyard at Captain’s was once quite hefty. Remember, that exact bridge could be found on a number of binoculars sporting a number of brand names and models.

The best advice? If your time is worth minimum wage and you can’t locate the part that way ... let the opportunity pass.

Just a thought,

Bill
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Old Sunday 9th July 2017, 19:17   #5
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Is 3D printer material strong enough to make a duplicate?

What about a QRP for an obsolete professional tripod? Would 3D printing be strong enough?
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Old Sunday 9th July 2017, 21:25   #6
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Is 3D printer material strong enough to make a duplicate?

What about a QRP for an obsolete professional tripod? Would 3D printing be strong enough?
That is totally out of my league of knowledge; sorry.

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Old Monday 10th July 2017, 04:14   #7
etudiant
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Is 3D printer material strong enough to make a duplicate?

What about a QRP for an obsolete professional tripod? Would 3D printing be strong enough?
Not unless you have access to GEs engineering shop.
They are 3D printing metal jet engine parts, albeit not the rotating bits.
The printers available to consumers use plastic feedstock, which is not as strong or as dimensionally precise.
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Old Tuesday 11th July 2017, 08:20   #8
Elmer Fudd
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I sent a mail to the customer's service of Canon in Germany and now I am waiting for an answer but still browsing for another specimen of the 7x35.

Thank you for your informations.
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