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Old Monday 20th June 2011, 16:24   #1
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Trochilidae

Parra, Rahbek, McGuire & Graham 2011. Contrasting patterns of phylogenetic assemblage structure along the elevational gradient for major hummingbird clades. J Biogeogr: in press. abstract
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Old Friday 24th June 2011, 09:38   #2
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Red-billed Streamertail

Graves & Prys-Jones 2011. Rediscovery of the holotype of Trochilus maria Gosse, 1849 (Aves: Apodiformes: Trochilidae). Zootaxa 2929: 59-63. preview

Still just a synonym of T polytmus, or do the authors conclude otherwise?

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Old Thursday 27th October 2011, 16:52   #3
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Juan L. Parra, Jimmy A. McGuire, Catherine H. Graham. Incorporating Clade Identity in Analyses of Phylogenetic Community Structure: An Example with Hummingbirds. The American Naturalist, Vol. 176, No. 5 (November 2010), pp. 573-587.
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Old Friday 20th September 2013, 05:57   #4
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Zootaxa 3716 (1): 081–097 (20 Sept. 2013)
Molecular evidence of the taxonomic status of western Mexican populations of Phaethornis longirostris (Aves: Trochilidae)
ENRIQUE ARBELÁEZ-CORTÉS & ADOLFO G. NAVARRO-SIGÜENZA

abstract
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Old Saturday 14th December 2013, 09:18   #5
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Andean hummingbirds

Projecto-Garcia, Natarajan, Moriyama, Weber, Fago, Cheviron, Dudley, McGuire, Witt & Storz (in press). Repeated elevational transitions in hemoglobin function during the evolution of Andean hummingbirds. PNAS. [abstract] [supp info]

GrrlScientist, The Guardian, 13 Dec 2013: How do hummingbirds thrive in the Andes?

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Old Sunday 16th February 2014, 22:54   #7
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That is one paper I am looking forward to read

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Old Wednesday 26th March 2014, 14:12   #8
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Projecto-Garcia et al pdf

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Projecto-Garcia, Natarajan, Moriyama, Weber, Fago, Cheviron, Dudley, McGuire, Witt & Storz (in press). Repeated elevational transitions in hemoglobin function during the evolution of Andean hummingbirds. PNAS. [abstract] [supp info]
Projecto-Garcia et al (in press). PNAS. [pdf]
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Old Wednesday 26th March 2014, 14:12   #9
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McGuire et al...

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McGuire, J. A., C. C. Witt, J. V. Remsen, Jr., A. Corl, D. L. Rabosky, D. L. Altshuler, R. Dudley. In review. Molecular phylogenetics and diversification of the hummingbirds.
McGuire, Witt, Remsen, Corl, Rabosky, Altshuler & Dudley (in press). Curr Biol.
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(Early online publication scheduled for April 4, 2014).
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Old Thursday 3rd April 2014, 20:53   #10
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McGuire et al

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Submitted:
McGuire, J. A., C. C. Witt, J. V. Remsen, Jr., A. Corl, D. L. Rabosky, D. L. Altshuler, R. Dudley. In review. Molecular phylogenetics and diversification of the hummingbirds.
McGuire, Witt, Remsen, Corl, Rabosky, Altshuler & Dudley (in press). Molecular phylogenetics and the diversification of hummingbirds. Curr Biol. [abstract]
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Old Friday 4th April 2014, 09:48   #11
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McGuire et al

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McGuire, Witt, Remsen, Corl, Rabosky, Altshuler & Dudley (in press). Molecular phylogenetics and the diversification of hummingbirds. Curr Biol. [abstract]
UC Berkeley News Center, 3 Apr 2014: Hummingbird evolution soared after invading South America 22 million years ago.

Nature News, 3 Apr 2014: Hummingbird diversity still booming.

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Old Friday 4th April 2014, 14:18   #12
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I guess that making taxonomic recommendations at the genus level was beyond the scope of this paper, but looking at the phylogenetic trees in the supplementary material it looks like numerous changes would be in order. From a quick perusal, here are a few things that stand out:

- Marvellous Spatuletail (Loddigesia mirablis) is embedded within the Eriocnemis pufflegs, with Blue-capped Puffleg (Eriocnemis glaucopoides) as its sister species.

- Brazilian Ruby (Clytolaema rubricauda) is embedded within the Heliodoxa brilliants.

- Bearded Mountaineer (Oreonympha nobilis) and Bearded Helmetcrest (Oxypogon) are embedded within the Chalcostigma thornbills

- The woodstars are all over the place with Slender-tailed Woodstar (Microstilbon burmeisteri) embedded within Chaetocercus and Calliphlox part of 2-3 different clades.

- Cynanthus, Chlorostilbon, and Cyanophaia are all part of one big clade and would presumably either all have to be lumped into one genus, or current genus boundaries would have to be re-arranged.

- Mexican Woodnymph (Thalurania ridgwayi) is embedded within a different clade from that of the other four Thaularina (which are monophyletic if ridgwayi is excluded). T. ridgway is sister to Eupherusa, a genus endemic to Mexico and Central America. The other Thaularina are sister to Chalybura (the plumleteers)

- Leucippus is also all over the place: L. fallax (Buffy Hummingbird) is sister to Scaly-breasted Hummingbird (Phaeochroa cuvierii), L. chlorocercus (Olive-spotted Hummingbird) is basal to a big clade that includes Amazilia, Trochilus, and several other genera, while the other two Leucippus are sisters.

- The genus Amazilia is also all over the place within the clade that's sister to Olive-spotted Hummingbird.

I'm sure I missed a few but it seems that several taxonomic revisions are in order. I'm also intrigued by the presence of a Colibri sp. sister to C. thalassinus (Green Violetear) in the phylogenetic trees.
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Old Sunday 6th April 2014, 03:30   #13
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- Marvellous Spatuletail (Loddigesia mirablis) is embedded within the Eriocnemis pufflegs, with Blue-capped Puffleg (Eriocnemis glaucopoides) as its sister species.
Was the Booted Racket-tail Ocreatus underwoodii sampled? Back when there whisperings that the Spatuletail was related to the Pufflegs, I thought that perhaps it would turn out to be closest to Ocreatus, which is traditionally thought to be close to Eriocnemis. The racket tail feathers in both species might then be homologous structures. Looks like this isn't the case though.

I think its a pity really that a monotypic genus will probably be lost for one of the world's most unusual and distinctive avian species. That's science I guess. Do the individual gene trees all place Loddigesia in Eriocnemis?

If Loddigesia mirabilis ends up subsumed into Eriocnemis, then the Colourful Puffleg Eriocnemis mirabilis Meyer de Schauensee, 1967, will need a new name.

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Old Sunday 6th April 2014, 06:42   #14
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Was the Booted Racket-tail Ocreatus underwoodii sampled? Back when there whisperings that the Spatuletail was related to the Pufflegs, I thought that perhaps it would turn out to be closest to Ocreatus, which is traditionally thought to be close to Eriocnemis. The racket tail feathers in both species might then be homologous structures. Looks like this isn't the case though.
Yes, Booted Racket-tail was sampled and it was sister to the two species of Urosticte white-tips - the females are quite similar so I guess it's not all that surprising. Both Booted Racket-tail and Marvelous Spatuletail are part of what the authors call the 'Brilliants' clade, but within this clade there are two sub-clades, the pufflegs (Eriocnemis, Haplophaedia and now Loddigesia) and all the rest (including Ocreatus, Urosticte, Coeligena, Heliodoxa, Boissoneaua, Aglaeactis, etc.).

Both gene trees show the same relationships for Loddigesia, and are in fact quite similar overall.

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Old Sunday 6th April 2014, 07:03   #15
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I think its a pity really that a monotypic genus will probably be lost for one of the world's most unusual and distinctive avian species. That's science I guess. Do the individual gene trees all place Loddigesia in Eriocnemis?

If Loddigesia mirabilis ends up subsumed into Eriocnemis, then the Colourful Puffleg Eriocnemis mirabilis Meyer de Schauensee, 1967, will need a new name.
I'm struggling with this one. The sister sp to Eriocnemis glaucopoides, is the outrageously different Loddigesia mirabilis and the very similar Eriocnemis mirabilis is not included.

Has human error definitely been ruled out?
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Old Sunday 6th April 2014, 07:22   #16
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[QUOTE
I'm struggling with this one. The sister sp to Eriocnemis glaucopoides, is the outrageously different Loddigesia mirabilis and the very similar Eriocnemis mirabilis is not included.

Has human error definitely been ruled out?[/quote]

I think the only specimens of Eriocnemis mirabilis are the type series collected in 1967, so it's not surprising that it was not included in the analysis.

What I do find surprising is that out of all the species of Eriocnemis, Loddigesia would be sister to the most geographically distant one (E. glaucopoides is endemic to Bolivia and Argentina, while all the other species of Eriocnemis are found between Colombia and Peru).
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Old Sunday 6th April 2014, 08:24   #17
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Fair point Cajanuma but there are other anomalies.

For example, Campylopterus rufus appears in two disparate places.

In the first position, it is sister to C. excellens and both are placed outside Campylopterus.

In the second position, it is sister to C. hemileucurus and embedded within Campylopterus.

So - does the monospecific, morphologically uniform C. rufus actually consist of two cryptic species belonging to separate genera ...or should the results of this paper be regarded as tentative?
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Old Sunday 6th April 2014, 08:48   #18
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Rufous Sabrewing

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...Campylopterus rufus appears in two disparate places.
In the first position, it is sister to C. excellens and both are placed outside Campylopterus.
In the second position, it is sister to C. hemileucurus and embedded within Campylopterus.
So - does the monospecific, morphologically uniform C. rufus actually consist of two cryptic species belonging to separate genera ...or should the results of this paper be regarded as tentative?
Both specimens of Campylopterus rufus (FMNH 434025/434026) were collected on the same date at the same location in El Salvador.
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Old Sunday 6th April 2014, 09:08   #19
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Both specimens of Campylopterus rufus (FMNH 434025/434026) were collected on the same date at the same location in El Salvador.
Good catch. On the face of it it would seem that the position of these two specimens on the trees can't possibly be right
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Old Tuesday 8th April 2014, 04:10   #20
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Grrlscientist in The Grauniad

http://www.theguardian.com/science/g...hylogeny-andes

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Old Tuesday 8th April 2014, 18:47   #21
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McGuire et al pdfs

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McGuire, Witt, Remsen, Corl, Rabosky, Altshuler & Dudley (in press). Molecular phylogenetics and the diversification of hummingbirds. Curr Biol. [abstract]
McGuire et al (in press). Curr Biol. [article] [article + supp info (21 MB)]
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Old Wednesday 9th April 2014, 03:58   #22
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I'm struggling with this one. The sister sp to Eriocnemis glaucopoides, is the outrageously different Loddigesia mirabilis and the very similar Eriocnemis mirabilis is not included.

Has human error definitely been ruled out?
And just to confuse things further, the illustrated example they give for the Brilliants clade is the (supposedly) unsampled Eriocnemis mirabilis!
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Old Friday 11th April 2014, 08:09   #23
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Selasphorus

Clark 2014. Harmonic hopping, and both punctuated and gradual evolution of acoustic characters in Selasphorus hummingbird tail-feathers. PLoS ONE 9(4): e93829. [article] [pdf]
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Old Tuesday 15th April 2014, 07:50   #24
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McGuire et al 2014

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McGuire, Witt, Remsen, Corl, Rabosky, Altshuler & Dudley 2014. Molecular phylogenetics and the diversification of hummingbirds. Curr Biol 24(8): 910–916. [abstract] [article] [article + supp info (21 MB)]
David Callahan, Birdwatch Listcheck, 14 Apr 2014: Hummingbirds a-gogo.
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Old Sunday 20th April 2014, 06:25   #25
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I'm also intrigued by the presence of a Colibri sp. sister to C. thalassinus (Green Violetear) in the phylogenetic trees.
A search for the B-number (49711) on the LSU Museum of Natural History's website gives this specimen as Aglaeactis aliciae (which, after checking the tree, would appear to be unsampled).

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