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Old Tuesday 2nd August 2005, 19:55   #26
HarassedDad
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no scarcity in norfolk, but i do have a lot in pupae on my nettles at the moment and I've twice noticed parasitic egg laying by small flies/wasps?- so it might be it's a good year for parasites.
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Old Tuesday 2nd August 2005, 20:29   #27
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I had no problems finding ladybirds in the spring, at least 13 species seen.
It might just be me but i find that ladybirds are easist to find in Spring & Autumn with the months of June & July the quietest probably because most are in the larval or pupal stages.

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Old Wednesday 10th August 2005, 17:30   #28
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Ladybird ?? Id Please

Saw this feeding on a tree today at work, cannot remember seeing anything like it before or find it in any of my books, anyone got any idea??
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Old Wednesday 10th August 2005, 18:21   #29
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Certainly a VERY attractive bug........though as to ID I can't help with that *sorry*

Looking at the thumbnail before clicking on to it I thought it was a newly-emerged ladybird but having a much better look with the bigger pic I'm not so sure!
Somebody will know...

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Old Wednesday 10th August 2005, 19:41   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by simon
Saw this feeding on a tree today at work, cannot remember seeing anything like it before or find it in any of my books, anyone got any idea??
It is a shield bug nymph,dificult to id them at this stage of life--Over to Harry!

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Old Wednesday 10th August 2005, 20:44   #31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mothman
It is a shield bug nymph,dificult to id them at this stage of life--Over to Harry!

Colin.
Thanks Colin,
just did a google for this nymph and the garden safari have a section on them, recoginize them as adults my guess is that this is a Tritomegas species nymph
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Old Thursday 11th August 2005, 00:39   #32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by simon
Saw this feeding on a tree today at work, cannot remember seeing anything like it before or find it in any of my books, anyone got any idea??
Hello Simon,

Mothman is quite correct, it is a Shieldbug nymph, (4th instar) the species is Troilus luridus It has several English 'Common Names' including the Stealthy Shieldbug and the Lurid Shieldbug. The nymphs are exclusively predators on lepidopterous and Colepterous larva. A common tree dwelling species found south of Northumberland where it was only detected a couple of years ago.

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Old Friday 12th August 2005, 20:38   #33
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Quote:
Originally Posted by harry eales
Hello Simon,

Mothman is quite correct, it is a Shieldbug nymph, (4th instar) the species is Troilus luridus It has several English 'Common Names' including the Stealthy Shieldbug and the Lurid Shieldbug. The nymphs are exclusively predators on lepidopterous and Colepterous larva. A common tree dwelling species found south of Northumberland where it was only detected a couple of years ago.

Harry
Well done that man

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Old Saturday 13th August 2005, 07:57   #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by harry eales
Hello Simon,

Mothman is quite correct, it is a Shieldbug nymph, (4th instar) the species is Troilus luridus It has several English 'Common Names' including the Stealthy Shieldbug and the Lurid Shieldbug. The nymphs are exclusively predators on lepidopterous and Colepterous larva. A common tree dwelling species found south of Northumberland where it was only detected a couple of years ago.

Harry
Thanks Harry
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Old Friday 19th August 2005, 22:40   #35
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Ladybird box?

I have loads of roses in my garden and although they have not been attacked to badly this year last year was a nightmare for green fly and then the ants started farming them to my Horror.

Are these Ladybird boxes worth it?
Do they work?

I will buy one if somebody could give me a clear yes!!!


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Old Friday 19th August 2005, 23:07   #36
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ALASKA
I have loads of roses in my garden and although they have not been attacked to badly this year last year was a nightmare for green fly and then the ants started farming them to my Horror.

Are these Ladybird boxes worth it?
Do they work?

I will buy one if somebody could give me a clear yes!!!


Best wishes.
Hello Alaska,
Ladybird boxes, like Bumblebee or Solitary Bee nesting boxes, together with Lacewing hibernation boxes only do one thing. They make money for whoever is manufacturing and promoting them.

They may work on the rare occasion and it's usually that purchaser who gives a lot of free advertising to the manufacturer.

By all means spend an hour or so in the workshop making one out of scrap materials, but don't waste your money buying one. Insects are very particular as to where they nest or hibernate, and I think man has a lot to learn about such places, before he can duplicate them.

But, if you want to waste your money, well, it's yours to do so.

Harry
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Old Saturday 20th August 2005, 17:24   #37
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Quote:
Originally Posted by harry eales
Hello Alaska,
Ladybird boxes, like Bumblebee or Solitary Bee nesting boxes, together with Lacewing hibernation boxes only do one thing. They make money for whoever is manufacturing and promoting them.

They may work on the rare occasion and it's usually that purchaser who gives a lot of free advertising to the manufacturer.

By all means spend an hour or so in the workshop making one out of scrap materials, but don't waste your money buying one. Insects are very particular as to where they nest or hibernate, and I think man has a lot to learn about such places, before he can duplicate them.

But, if you want to waste your money, well, it's yours to do so.

Harry
Thanks i do not think i will bother

Thanks
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Old Saturday 20th August 2005, 19:43   #38
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Got one for xmas one year-they are great if you like Earwigs!

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Old Wednesday 7th September 2005, 08:51   #39
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Ladybird scientific name query

Are 5 spot ladybirds etc unique in having a numeral in their scientific name? e.g. Coccinella 5-punctata . I can't think of any birds or flowers with one in.
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Old Wednesday 7th September 2005, 10:02   #40
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lucky Birder
Are 5 spot ladybirds etc unique in having a numeral in their scientific name? e.g. Coccinella 5-punctata . I can't think of any birds or flowers with one in.
Hello LB,

I think your correct in that numbers are unique to Ladybirds. However, as I understand it, the use of numbers is simply a way of making the writing of a scientific name easier and more perhaps understandable to most people and especially those of us who haven't had the benefit of being taught Latin.

Most amateur naturalists would recognise bipunctata as two spot and decipunctata as 10 spot, but how many would recognise the number 7 or 22 when written in Latin? A scientist or taxonomist may use the full Latin specific name in a scientific paper, but it likely that it will only be read by another of the same ilk, who will understand it.

I wonder how long it will be before we see Five and Six spot Burnet Moths written as 5 spot and 6 spot?

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Old Monday 12th September 2005, 10:30   #41
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Yellow Ladybird?

Hi, can anyone put a name to this character?
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Old Monday 12th September 2005, 11:21   #42
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lucky Birder
Hi, can anyone put a name to this character?
16-Spot Orange Ladybird Halyzia 16-guttata
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Old Tuesday 13th September 2005, 08:39   #43
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Last week, I purchased the Collins field guide, Insects of Britain and Northern Europe, its got a few ladybirds in, but this isn't one of them.
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Old Tuesday 13th September 2005, 09:36   #44
harry eales
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave Adshead
Last week, I purchased the Collins field guide, Insects of Britain and Northern Europe, its got a few ladybirds in, but this isn't one of them.
Hello Dave,

Sadly, Field Guides are generally useless, as they only show a very small number of specimens from each insect order. The chances of you finding an insect you can identify from a general fieldguide are greatly outweighed by the number you cannot identify from the same book.

The larger the geographical area covered by the book the less chance you have of identifying the specimens you may find from that book.

Insects are the most diverse form of life on Earth (above the microscopic level i.e. Bacteria and virus's). They outnumber all the other life forms put together by several times.

Well over 1 million insects have been described worldwide, and some authorities estimate that there at least another million species yet to be found and described.

Even the British insects which are arguably the best studied insects in the world are pooly served by books on identification. Certainly Butterflies, the larger moths and Dragonflies are well covered with recent publications, but many other orders, or less popular groups have not had a good identification guide published on them in the last half century.

Harry
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Old Tuesday 13th September 2005, 10:34   #45
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lucky Birder
Hi, can anyone put a name to this character?

Take a peep at

http://www.gardensafari.net/english/lady_bugs.htm

or

http://www.uksafari.com/ladybirds.htm
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Old Tuesday 13th September 2005, 11:38   #46
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I agree that it looks like an Halyzia 16-guttata, 16 spot Orange Ladybird, but yes the texts available are sometimes not too helpful.
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Old Thursday 15th September 2005, 09:27   #47
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Quote:
Originally Posted by trealawboy
Also the UK ladybird survey sites which have UK species plus Harlequin:

http://www.ladybird-survey.org/UKlad...Kladybirds.htm
http://www.ladybird-survey.pwp.bluey...k/londonla.htm
and of course http://www.eimagesite.net/s1/gst/run...ate=ukladybird
which hasat least one non-UK species (transverse) but you need to search for it.

Oh and yes it is Orange Ladybird Halyzia sedecimguttata.
Hugh
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Old Friday 7th October 2005, 13:16   #48
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Ladybirds

One of the reasons for non-inclusion may be that until a few years ago the Orange ladybird was quite rare. 20 years ago they were rarely seen in ancient oak woods, then they appeared more commonly (often attracted to light). At the turn of the century there were several observations of thousands of them on beech and ash trees. Now regularly seen in London and not uncommon in Yorkshire and Derbyshire.
Anyone interested in ladybirds should read Roger Hawkins' 'Ladybirds of Surrey' - deals with all British ladybirds and well-illustrated. (Or, a bit of self-advertisement) you might like to look at my web-site
http://www.ladybird-survey.pwp.bluey...k/londonla.htm )
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave Adshead
Last week, I purchased the Collins field guide, Insects of Britain and Northern Europe, its got a few ladybirds in, but this isn't one of them.
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Old Friday 7th October 2005, 13:25   #49
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'Harlequins'

Strange, to the best of my knowledge it hasn't reached Somerset yet - a couple in Devon but still mainly in SE England (and Derby). There's a regularly up-dated map at www.harlequin-survey.org
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stranger
Hi
Our local paper,Weston and Worle news,has an article on Harlequin Ladybirds in which it states the Harlequin is outcompeting the natives for food in Somerset.It also says the Harlequin is preying on native Ladybirds when food is short.
I have not noticed many Ladybirds or Aphids in the garden this year,maybe it`s the lack of Aphids that is causing the Ladybird scarcity.
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Old Friday 7th October 2005, 13:27   #50
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Ladybirds by region?

Hello Neil, I agree, it has actually been the best year for ladybirds since 1997 in London and the SE generally. It's perhaps always true that ladybirds are more numerous in the SE because it's warmer - I never see enormous numbers in S. Yorkshire.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Neil Harvey
There are plenty of all of the common species here in Essex; maybe a regional thing?
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