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Old Saturday 4th February 2006, 20:19   #76
GiG
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Hi,

I'm not sure if there is a previous thread but the ladybird species you are referring to is the Harlequin Ladybird.

Info can be found here http://www.harlequin-survey.org/ and here http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/4348881.stm

They were present for the first time in our local park in Ipswich last year.

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Old Saturday 4th February 2006, 21:03   #77
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This appears to be the same beast that has landed here. Our first summer in our present house, the south side of our screened (thankfully) porch was literally covered with the smelly little bugs. There was hardly a space on the south side of the house where you could put an outstretched hand without touching them. There must have been 10's of thousands. We were vacuuming up to 20 a day out of windows for a couple of months.

Luckily they have never been that bad since, although they we do find the odd one in the house, even through the winter months. I killed one just two days ago. They smell so much the cat won't touch them, and they even bite on occassion.

I'm afraid they are here to stay now. If you can stop them there then go for it, but I have my doubts. And to think that it used to be a treat to find them when it was the native types. Hopefully they at least keep the introduced aphid infestations down.

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Old Sunday 5th February 2006, 12:47   #78
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That is just horrible what happened to you Scot especially in a new house.
You are not that far from us in Northants. I think I saw one last year but not sure.
We do have large native ladybirds... The one I saw had big black splodges not spots. I only saw the one.. I dont want to go and squish a native.
Thanks Gi for the web link. found a few more web sites of intrest and help with id.
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Old Sunday 5th February 2006, 16:09   #79
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Quote:
Originally Posted by willowa
You are not that far from us in Northants.
Just for the record, I'm near Peterborough, CANADA.

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Old Sunday 5th February 2006, 17:45   #80
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cavan wood
Just for the record, I'm near Peterborough, CANADA.

Scott
Ho! Sorry. I thought you were In Northants.

I was talking about the Harlequin Ladybirds that are in the UK, that are not native to the UK.
Im not sure where these Ladybirds come from. Are they native In Canada or the States or they an alien species there too.
They seem to be killing our smaller ladybirds. They eat all the aphids then apparently eat the Ladybirds.

We also had problems with a flat worm that was not native. That was eating our earthworms. The places where this worm was the Blackbirds disappeared as there was no food for them. I have not heard any thing else about this worm for a few years.
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Old Sunday 5th February 2006, 18:37   #81
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Quote:
Originally Posted by willowa
IF this has been aired before please let me know the tread.

Has anyone got any information on the ladybirds none native to the UK. That are putting our native ladytbirds in danger (If there is not enough food to go round). Have you got any photos of these to compare with our own species.
And what do we do( if anything) about them.
Hi,
One of the problems is that they vary qute a lot, there are three variants here:
http://www.eimagesite.net/s1/gst/run...h3n&orid=21794

I was told that, provided you are certain of the identification, you should kill them. ( www.eimagesite.net has a UK Ladybird image gallery, I believe that all the images currently in it have had their identification verified )

Hugh

Last edited by 138mph : Monday 6th February 2006 at 13:05.
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Old Sunday 5th February 2006, 19:08   #82
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 138mph
Hi,
One of the problems is that they vary qute a lot, there are three variants here:
http://www.eimagesite.net/s1/gst/run...2003,2000,1577

I was told that, provided you are certain of the identification, you should kill them. ( www.eimagesite.net has a UK Ladybird image gallery, I believe that all the images currently in it have had their identification verified )

Hugh
Thank you..
This it is very useful. I think many of the natives are from forests, prob will not venture into gardens. But if they do I can check with this site first. I don't like killing things for the sake of it.
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Old Monday 6th February 2006, 08:32   #83
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There is quite a lot about this in the earlier thread 'Numbers of ladybirds - UK' but just to put my bit in ...
This is an Asian species so is not native to either Europe or North America (see http://www.ladybird-survey.pwp.bluey...H_axyridis.htm ) it was deliberately imported to both USA & France from whence they have spread all over the continents.
The important thing is not to mistake one of our 40+ natives for them - see
http://www.ladybird-survey.pwp.bluey...k/londonla.htm
When they first appeared in UK, it was hoped that collecting them would stop colonisation - which didn't work! There are now hundreds of thousands so killing one or two won't make any difference. If in doubt - leave them alone. Or load a picture here or send specimens/pictures to the numerous ladybird surveys going on t present.
Cheers, Paul
Quote:
Originally Posted by willowa
Thank you..
This it is very useful. I think many of the natives are from forests, prob will not venture into gardens. But if they do I can check with this site first. I don't like killing things for the sake of it.
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Old Saturday 25th March 2006, 22:40   #84
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Ladybirds already

Seen several ladybirds in porched area of garden in past few days - its still cold in Sussex and thought they were quite early - plenty of greenfly already on shrubs though so there's certainly food around.
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Old Sunday 26th March 2006, 08:40   #85
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It was quite warm here in suffolk yesterday and I saw lots of ladybirds, I haven't looked for aphids and greenfly yet but there were flies about, what a change in the weather compared to last weekend.
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Old Sunday 26th March 2006, 13:01   #86
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Gotta be a bit smug, and say we saw ladybirds (7-spots) in January.

We had a mild sunny period for a few days and (although I'll have to check) on the 28th me an my good 'un were out walking, and came across a gorse bush with dozens of them.

I guess they know what they're doing and have been tucked up during the cold snaps since, but now that Spring seems to be here...
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Old Wednesday 29th March 2006, 16:13   #87
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Over the country there have been 7-spot records over the winter for several years - not as many this year as in the past. I'm beginning to wonder if they do actually hibernate! I think you're right - they come out on bright,relatively warm days. Paul M
PS: is your 'good un' a lass or a dog? Just wonder!
Quote:
Originally Posted by birdman
Gotta be a bit smug, and say we saw ladybirds (7-spots) in January.
We had a mild sunny period for a few days and (although I'll have to check) on the 28th me an my good 'un were out walking, and came across a gorse bush with dozens of them.
I guess they know what they're doing and have been tucked up during the cold snaps since, but now that Spring seems to be here...
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Old Tuesday 4th April 2006, 16:46   #88
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What happened?

I'd be interested to know what happened - did any survive? Were they evicted? Did they come back?

Quote:
Originally Posted by roosmum
I have some friends with a Guest House, it's a Victorian building with central heating. Every Winter they have ladybirds sneaking in to sleep in the ceiling corners ................ should they evict the ones in the rooms or leave them to overwinter where they are? I'm dubious about the heating situation as they close for a couple of weeks over Christmas and New Year and I think the ladybirds might think it's Spring when the heating in the rooms comes back on in January.
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Old Tuesday 4th April 2006, 19:23   #89
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Quote:
Originally Posted by paul mabbott
I'd be interested to know what happened - did any survive? Were they evicted? Did they come back?
Hi Paul, it was not straightforward....
An elderly couple stayed for several days in the room where the ladybirds were collected in the corner of the ceiling. While they were there the ladybirds disappeared and we assumed they had thought it the best thing to evict them.
A couple of weeks later I was dusting the centre light shade (a glass globe type) and a great number of desiccated ladybirds fell out. I can only assume that they had become cold and moved to the light for warmth... but stayed too long.
A managerial decision has now been made that in future any ladybirds be evicted immediately.
Having said that, we are now finding a few on the insides of the windows that have survived the Winter tucked away and these are also being helped on their way!
The ones that spent the Winter in the brickwork and around the patio doors are fine!
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Old Sunday 16th April 2006, 14:12   #90
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An up-date. Ladybirds have become active somewhat later than in recent years - not a bad thing because they'll have plenty to eat. There have been large numbers (thousands) around the Essex coast which is unusual for thi stime of year. Pine ladybirds are now out and about on tree trunks where they'll mate before going up into the canopy. Plenty of other species to be seen including the dreaded Harmonia axyridis! The only species that has not been seen in expected numbers is the 2-spot - are they already suffering from the effect of the 'harlequin'?
I hope everyone will be collecting records and submitting them to one of the many surveys now active. It's important to get good data on our native species so that we can see what effect, if any, they're having on native species.
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Old Monday 17th April 2006, 08:12   #91
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Several 7 spot ladybirds in the garden and in the local park this weekend, and saw the first Harlequin ladybird of the year in the park on Friday.

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Old Monday 17th April 2006, 14:54   #92
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Had my first 7-spot Ladybird in my front garden on Friday....along with my first Honey bee, two species of Bumble Bee and a Hover Fly for the new year.

Always gives me such a buzz to see the first insects emerging....a sure sign that summer WILL arrive at some point!
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Old Monday 17th April 2006, 16:16   #93
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Certainly is good to see insects becoming active again.
I hope that you and Gill, and everyone else are sending your records to one of the many ladybird surveys. This will be very helpful, not only in tracking the invading 'harlequin'.
You can log records at http://www.ladybird-survey.org/
or send them to me - I'd especially welcome detailed records from London/Essex or the UK north of Birmingham!

Quote:
Originally Posted by gi2012
Several 7 spot ladybirds in the garden and in the local park this weekend, and saw the first Harlequin ladybird of the year in the park on Friday.

Gi
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Old Monday 17th April 2006, 16:35   #94
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I Live in north Ohio & have been infested with ladybirds [ladybugs here] for 2 or 3 weeks now.
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Old Monday 17th April 2006, 19:37   #95
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Interested in that (I have colleagues in Ohio!). Do you know which species is infesting you? From what I gather, you had large numbers of Harmonia axyridis - the multivariate Asian, halloween or harlequin ladybird. Is this still a problem. You might gather from our threads that this beast has now invaded UK and threatens our native species ....
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I Live in north Ohio & have been infested with ladybirds [ladybugs here] for 2 or 3 weeks now.
Brian.
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Old Monday 24th April 2006, 12:30   #96
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First Ladybird of the year

Have you seen your first Ladybird for 2006? I saw my first one on Friday on my window on the landing upstairs I let him on my hand & let him outside. Ladybirds have always been my fav insect
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Old Monday 24th April 2006, 15:14   #97
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Saw my first Ladybird on Thursday on the window I got it on my finger & let it go
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Old Monday 24th April 2006, 17:56   #98
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Yes, they're just starting to be active. Hope the wether stays warm!
Have you recorded your sighting on one of the surveys? What sort was it - 7-spot?
Cheers, Paul
Quote:
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Have you seen your first Ladybird for 2006? I saw my first one on Friday on my window on the landing upstairs I let him on my hand & let him outside. Ladybirds have always been my fav insect
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Old Monday 24th April 2006, 23:50   #99
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A few species already on my local patch including Kidney-spot Ladybirds on Sallow trunks at my local wetland plus Pine & Larch Ladybirds beaten from some Pine Trees on the local amenity area, plus of course plenty of 7-spots & a few 2-spots locally. Pine & Larch Ladybird pictures attached.
The Larch Ladybird was actually a new one for my loacal patch.

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Old Thursday 27th April 2006, 20:56   #100
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Here is a shot of one of the Kidney-spot Ladybirds mentioned in my previous post,

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