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Old Tuesday 2nd May 2006, 15:21   #101
paul mabbott
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I've just heard of harlequin ladybirds seen in Lincolnshire and more in Staffordshire - could appear anywhere now?
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Old Monday 5th June 2006, 13:32   #102
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Fungi

It's not just other ladybirds that our natives need to worry about - they suffer from parasitoids and diseases. One particular problem is infestation by fungi of the Laboulbienales group. This is slow-growing and doesn't immediately kill the ladybird so is most often seen early in the year. Very common on 2-spots (as the picture) in London. Is it seen much anywhere else?
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Old Thursday 8th June 2006, 21:22   #103
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'Ladybird' for confirmation

Could someone please confirm that this small ladybird is
Scymnus haemorrhoidalis, it was swept from a wet meadow
along with Coccidula rufa.

Stuart.
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Old Friday 9th June 2006, 08:00   #104
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There's a good chance - *if* it's Scymnus then it looks right although the antennae perhaps rather long? This isn't an easy one from a photo: there are other similar genera (e.g. Phalacrus). Some of the distinguishing features are on the underside of the body...... I'm also not sure whether it would be found in a wet habitat (unlike C. rufa) - it is found in long, dense grass so perhaps wet/dry isn't relevant?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stuart Read
Could someone please confirm that this small ladybird is
Scymnus haemorrhoidalis, it was swept from a wet meadow
along with Coccidula rufa.

Stuart.
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Old Friday 9th June 2006, 11:05   #105
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Thanks Paul, i will give the specimen to the local beetle recorder for confirmation.
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Old Wednesday 14th June 2006, 09:31   #106
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Do let us know the conclusion! Most interesting ...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stuart Read
Thanks Paul, i will give the specimen to the local beetle recorder for confirmation.
Stuart.
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Old Thursday 15th June 2006, 10:14   #107
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Immaculate herlequins

A lot of the current generation of Harmonia axyridis are poorly spotted or un-spotted - seems to be an early summer phenomenon.
This picture from the back also shows, not too well, a feature of the 'harlequin' that can distinguish it from British ladybirds - it has a 'keel' towards the end of its body - there are slightly raised ridges around a depression at the end of each elytron.
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Old Friday 16th June 2006, 19:46   #108
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Harlequin Ladybird

Is this the Harlequin Ladybird (Harmonia axyridis)
Take in my back garden to day
hugh
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Old Saturday 17th June 2006, 10:05   #109
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Yes, the succinea form which is most common at the moment.

Quote:
Originally Posted by hughredcanary
Is this the Harlequin Ladybird (Harmonia axyridis)
Take in my back garden to day
hugh
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Old Saturday 17th June 2006, 11:38   #110
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Quote:
Originally Posted by paul mabbott
Yes, the succinea form which is most common at the moment.
paul thanks for the reply
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Old Wednesday 21st June 2006, 15:03   #111
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Yellow ladybird?

This morning I saw a yellow ladybird with white spots. My first thought was "harlequin" but I've looked at lots of pictures and haven't seen one similar. It was only the size of a common ladybird too. It's legs were pale yellow and the only thing that looked dark about it was it's eyes which appeared to be black. I went to look for something to capture it in for a closer look but of course when I returned it was gone!
Can anybody identify it please?
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Old Wednesday 21st June 2006, 15:30   #112
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Quote:
Originally Posted by roosmum
This morning I saw a yellow ladybird with white spots. My first thought was "harlequin" but I've looked at lots of pictures and haven't seen one similar. It was only the size of a common ladybird too. It's legs were pale yellow and the only thing that looked dark about it was it's eyes which appeared to be black. I went to look for something to capture it in for a closer look but of course when I returned it was gone!
Can anybody identify it please?

Possibly 16-spot Ladybird
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Old Wednesday 21st June 2006, 18:01   #113
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Sorry, can't identify without a spot check! There are two (serious) possibilities: the cream-spot ladybird (Calvia quattuordecimguttata) and the orange ladybird (Halyzia sedecimguttata). Outside bets are the eighteen-spot ladybird and various exotics. The cream-spot is the most likely - this prefers trees but is not uncommonly seen on other plants.
However, I would describe both of these as having brown/orange background colours (paler when 'new') rather than yellow.
For future reference, the 'harlequin' ladybird (Harmonia axyridis) *never* has cream spots - they may be orange, almost yellow sometimes, but not white/cream.
Cheers, Paul

Quote:
Originally Posted by roosmum
This morning I saw a yellow ladybird with white spots. My first thought was "harlequin" but I've looked at lots of pictures and haven't seen one similar. It was only the size of a common ladybird too. It's legs were pale yellow and the only thing that looked dark about it was it's eyes which appeared to be black. I went to look for something to capture it in for a closer look but of course when I returned it was gone!
Can anybody identify it please?
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Old Wednesday 21st June 2006, 18:03   #114
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16-spot ladybirds (Tytthaspis sedecimpunctata) have black spots.
They are often very numerous but are only commonly found on semi-natural grassland in SE England.

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Old Sunday 25th June 2006, 19:54   #115
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Ladybird for ID

Paxton Pits, Cambridgeshire 2006-06-25 - very small, I would guess its some form of either 2 or 10 spot.
All reasonable suggestions for an ID welcomed,
Thanks
Hugh
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Old Sunday 25th June 2006, 23:10   #116
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Yes, you'd be right! Problem is, this is an immature - has recently emerged from the pupa. Most likely it's a 10-spot melanic but the critical diagnosis would be the underside/leg colouriing of the beetle *when* it had reached full colouration. But I'd give you 99-1 that it's Adalia decempunctata! The 'lunata' form of the A. bipunctata is quite rare.

Quote:
Originally Posted by 138mph
Paxton Pits, Cambridgeshire 2006-06-25 - very small, I would guess its some form of either 2 or 10 spot.
All reasonable suggestions for an ID welcomed,
Thanks
Hugh
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Old Thursday 6th July 2006, 10:11   #117
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Thanks Paul.

Just thought it worth mentioning that this particular ladybird was seemingly being attacked by an early instar of the Blue Shield Bug, Zicrona caerulea , whose prey is listed as larva of leaf beetles, moths, and butterflies.
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Old Thursday 6th July 2006, 13:43   #118
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Most predators will take anything that moves if they can't find their preferred prey. Possibly, at the moment, there are not too many caterpillars about (been eaten by those birds!) so the bug is seeking something else. This week, studying ladybirds on a group of trees I've seen ladybirds attacked by spiders and anthocorid bugs, as well as (and most often) by other ladybirds; as well as being parasitised by wasps and flies. It's a jungle out there!

ladybirds.
Quote:
Originally Posted by 138mph
Thanks Paul.
Just thought it worth mentioning that this particular ladybird was seemingly being attacked by an early instar of the Blue Shield Bug, Zicrona caerulea , whose prey is listed as larva of leaf beetles, moths, and butterflies.
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Old Tuesday 1st August 2006, 12:23   #119
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Ladybird "I.D."

Found a couple of these on the coast at the weekend and thought perhaps they could be young Cream Spotted ladybirds ? as the spots seem to be in a line.
any links to Ladybird ID welcome
Brian
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Old Tuesday 1st August 2006, 13:45   #120
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I'm no expert, but I think it could be a 10 spot (Adalia decimpunctata...scientific name could even be wrong !). They are very variable, and similar in size to the also very variable 2 spot (Adalia bipunctata), but apparently have yellowish rather than black legs. Was it the size of a 2 spot ?
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Old Tuesday 1st August 2006, 14:29   #121
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Larry Wheatland
I'm no expert, but I think it could be a 10 spot (Adalia decimpunctata...scientific name could even be wrong !). They are very variable, and similar in size to the also very variable 2 spot (Adalia bipunctata), but apparently have yellowish rather than black legs. Was it the size of a 2 spot ?
There where two this one about only 3-4mm other even smaller am I right in thinking they are a new hatch do Ladybirds change to adult colour,not sure of the leg colour as original photo not on this computer .
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Old Tuesday 1st August 2006, 14:41   #122
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This page should be helpful:
http://www.ladybird-survey.org/UKladybirds/ID.htm

Looks like a 10-spot to me.
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Old Wednesday 2nd August 2006, 02:23   #123
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It is a 10-spot Ladybird

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Old Friday 4th August 2006, 21:04   #124
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian Bullough
There where two this one about only 3-4mm other even smaller am I right in thinking they are a new hatch do Ladybirds change to adult colour,not sure of the leg colour as original photo not on this computer .
Brian
Everyone has this right - 10-spot ladybird - but, to answer your question, and for future reference ...
This could only be Adalia decempunctata or Harmonia quadripunctata because of (a) the pronotum (forebody) with lots of black spots on white and (b) the pale legs (not really 'yellow' - usually shades of brown but *never* all black). Despite their Latin names, both of these species are very variable. H. quadripunctata (the cream-streaked ladybird) may have between 0 and 16 spots - thus its European name [the four-spot ladybird] is not applicable in UK; it usually has two rows of black spots on the pronotum. It is quite large (5-6mms long).
The 10-spot may have between 0-21 spots, sometimes in strange patterns and often with spots of varying sizes. It also has two melanic forms (all black with two moon-shaped anterior red patches and black with ten (8/12) red/orange patches *but* usually has some white remaining on the pronotum and some brown on the legs.
I'm writing a web-page on Adalia variants (http://www.ladybird-survey.pwp.bluey....uk/adalia.htm ) but this has gone a little acock and I haven't looked at it for several months ... sorry.
Paul
PS: I hope you're logging these observations http://www.ladybird-survey.org/ and everyone else is doing the same!
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Old Friday 4th August 2006, 21:08   #125
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... and then I didn't answer your questions!
Ladybirds almost always have plain, buff elytra (wing cases) when they emerge from pupae - the pronota (forebodies) are generally patterned on emergence). The black spots develop fairly quickly (6-24 hours) but the ground colour may take much longer to develop, particularly in the 10-spot and, indeed, may often stay yellow/orange rather than red.
You can see one of the legs (right, fore) on your picture - clearly pale.
Paul
Quote:
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am I right in thinking they are a new hatch do Ladybirds change to adult colour,not sure of the leg colour as original photo not on this computer .
Brian
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