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Old Thursday 8th September 2016, 02:10   #1
thelabirder
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exercises for steadier hands??

Hi i am just buying some new binoculars and heard that if they have a high magnification rate it becomes more shaky if you dont have steady hands, so i was wondering if there was anything i could do to help this as my hands are slightly shaky.

Thanks
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Old Thursday 8th September 2016, 02:50   #2
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A big exit pupil helps, so go for an 8 x 40ish rather than an 8 x 30ish or a 10x glass (unless you want to go all the way to 10 x 50 but such glasses tend to be quite heavy and the selection is limited)
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Old Saturday 10th September 2016, 13:39   #3
SanAngelo
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thelabirder View Post
.......a high magnification rate it becomes more shaky if you dont have steady hands, so i was wondering if there was anything i could do to help this as my hands are slightly shaky.
Yes sir, those of us with tremors are always looking for a work-around to dexterity issues.

I use a marine cup or faceshield on a 10x, the tremors become a nonissue.

fugl's suggestion of an 8x40ish glass is also an alleviating factor, especially if you have vision problems.

Good luck my friend.

Last edited by SanAngelo : Saturday 10th September 2016 at 14:43. Reason: use > us
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Old Monday 19th September 2016, 18:39   #4
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What about a Finn stick?

Google it.
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Old Thursday 29th September 2016, 17:09   #5
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Yeah, any kind of brace or support will help. A tripod or monopod, a finn stick, a modified rifle stock, a face shield, even just leaning your shoulder against a tree.

As a photographer, I find that a lot of my wobbling is in my legs. Anytime I can sit or kneel, or lean on something solid, I get better shots. Directly bracing the camera is of course best of all, but not always possible. For tough shots, I'll consciously relax, take the best stance I can, and quiet my breathing so my shoulders don't move.

A very portable idea is to tie about five feet of string to your binocs, with a small weight (e.g., a bolt or nut) tied to the other end. Drop the weighted end, then step on the weight, and your binocs are now tethered to the ground. By maintaining a steady upward push with your arms, you should find that small unsteadiness in your arms doesn't result in any movement of the glass.
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Old Sunday 1st January 2017, 22:08   #6
Dan Miller
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Also, simply the way you hold your bins makes a difference. Tucking your elbows in and bracing them against your chest is much steadier than holding your elbows askew.
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Old Monday 19th June 2017, 05:00   #7
Beer-dee
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Also, simply the way you hold your bins makes a difference. Tucking your elbows in and bracing them against your chest is much steadier than holding your elbows askew.
I'm taking note of this one. thanks for the tip
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