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Old Saturday 12th August 2017, 14:18   #1
Tyne
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Leucistic Jackdaw can any one confirm

http://i526.photobucket.com/albums/c...psqlztl57a.jpg
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Old Saturday 12th August 2017, 14:38   #2
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Probably yes, but the pic quality is so poor it's hard to be sure - looks like it was taken through a window, and a lot of the "leucism" may just be reflections in the glass. Where was it taken, please?
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Old Saturday 12th August 2017, 18:29   #3
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Hi ,yes the picture was taking from my living room window ,it was a sunny day buti did see it later and it looked the same as in the pic but much clearer.
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Old Saturday 12th August 2017, 22:14   #4
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I don't thinks it's leucistic.. Leucistic is usually a paler to white colouration overall... This looks like a juv Jackdaw with bits of white flecks here and there... You see it a lot with Carrion Crows... They usually moult out to black when they next moult...
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Old Sunday 13th August 2017, 13:38   #5
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Here's a full on leucistic Jackdaw for you....
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Old Sunday 13th August 2017, 13:45   #6
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That is almost and in fact maybe, albino rather than leucistic, note leg and bill colour lacks pigment too. Not sure about irides, if they should change colour but the pupil, which isn't clear here maybe reddish?

Just to be clear, again, as this has been covered many times, even a single white feather is partial leucism, they don't have to be pale all over. Conversely, an all white bird isn't necessarily an albino unless even the bare part colours, including the eyes, lack pigmentation. This Jackdaw is an awkward one as they have grey eyes anyway.


A

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Old Sunday 13th August 2017, 18:04   #7
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From what I remember the dictionary definition of albino is any animal with white pigmentation which deviates from it's natural colour... So an all white leucistic is still an albino as well an animal of dilute colour.. I once went to see an albino Cassowary expecting a pink-eyed white bird, but instead found it had a pale ginger body with pale not quite pink eyes..
Many people claim an albino must be pure white and pink-eyed, but that is not the case...
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Old Sunday 13th August 2017, 21:41   #8
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Many thanks for the replies, i seen him again tonight .I must try to get a better pic.
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Old Sunday 13th August 2017, 21:53   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cinereous View Post
From what I remember the dictionary definition of albino is any animal with white pigmentation which deviates from it's natural colour... So an all white leucistic is still an albino as well an animal of dilute colour.. I once went to see an albino Cassowary expecting a pink-eyed white bird, but instead found it had a pale ginger body with pale not quite pink eyes..
Many people claim an albino must be pure white and pink-eyed, but that is not the case...
I'd go back to the dictionary if I were you, they are white because they have NO pigmentation.
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Old Sunday 13th August 2017, 21:59   #10
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Yes, albinos are white where fur or feathers are concerned and red or pink where bare parts are concerned as blood (red colour down to haemoglobin) show through = no pigment.

Leucistic is where partial pigment loss occurs, either in patches or dilution throughout. Various other terms apply in specific cases.

Or something like that ...
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Old Sunday 13th August 2017, 22:09   #11
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I'd go back to the dictionary if I were you, they are white because they have NO pigmentation.
Thanks Andy... Your right.. Of course no pigmentation.. But as you know the lack of pigmentation results in a white animal.. I'm just pointing there are degrees of albinism.. They don't have to pure white pink-eyed to be an albino...
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Old Sunday 13th August 2017, 22:18   #12
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Thanks Andy... Your right.. Of course no pigmentation.. But as you know the lack of pigmentation results in a white animal.. I'm just pointing there are degrees of albinism.. They don't have to pure white pink-eyed to be an albino...
They need to lack pigmentation everywhere, including the eyes which somehow manifests in the red colour as Dan explained. Without the pink eyed appearance, even a totally white bird is luecistic, not albinistic.

In an albino, even the bill and the legs, lack pigmentation just like the Jackdaw here, we just can't see quite enough of the eyes but I'd guess that it is an albino rather than leucistic.


A

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Old Sunday 13th August 2017, 22:37   #13
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Originally Posted by andyadcock View Post
They need to lack pigmentation everywhere, including the eyes which somehow manifests in the red colour. Without the pink eyed appearance, even a totally white bird is luecistic, not albinistic.

In an albino, even the bill and the legs, lack pigmentation just like the Jackdaw here, we just can't see quite enough of the eyes but I'd guess that it is an albino rather than leucistic.


A
Andy is right, I second that

Note that albinos are always all white for life because they are genetically unable to produce pigment, while leucistic are able to produce pigments; a dysfunction made the distribution of pigment erroneous, or reduce; the mistake, reduction or lack of pigment can be limited to a part of a feather, th the whole plumage or any intermediates. If he survives up to the next moult, it can have a different plumage, including a normal one. Never in albinos.

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Old Sunday 13th August 2017, 22:53   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by andyadcock View Post
They need to lack pigmentation everywhere, including the eyes which somehow manifests in the red colour. Without the pink eyed appearance, even a totally white bird is luecistic, not albinistic.

In an albino, even the bill and the legs, lack pigmentation just like the Jackdaw here, we just can't see quite enough of the eyes but I'd guess that it is an albino rather than leucistic.


A
Think you were slightly more right before you edited your post ... very disappointed

Bizarrely, given the subject, this just popped up on twitter -

https://twitter.com/BBCWorld/status/896774839087792128
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Old Sunday 13th August 2017, 22:55   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dantheman View Post
Think you were slightly more right before you edited your post ... very disappointed

Bizarrely, given the subject, this just popped up on twitter -

https://twitter.com/BBCWorld/status/896774839087792128
I misread your post, twice!

Re-fixed it for you........


A
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Old Sunday 13th August 2017, 23:02   #16
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Lots of blood vessels in the back of the eye ...
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Old Thursday 24th August 2017, 13:17   #17
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http://i526.photobucket.com/albums/c...psinprlyji.jpg
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Old Thursday 24th August 2017, 13:18   #18
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Latest pic of Jackdaw
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Old Thursday 24th August 2017, 22:08   #19
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yes is definitely a partially leucistic Jackdaw.
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Old Thursday 19th October 2017, 20:58   #20
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Latest pics of Jackdaw

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Old Friday 20th October 2017, 02:03   #21
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Abstract: Colour aberrations in birds – not only albinism and leucism lead to white plumages!
The colouration of the integument of most birds is often about entirely based on both melanin colour pigments, eumelanin and phaeomelanin. If these are produced in lower or higher quantities than usual or if their quality is reduced, aberrant appearances result. The different colour aberrations were historically named according to the appearances of affected birds and not according to the genetic causes for their abnormal appearances. Even today, we lack a common nomenclature or common definitions in this respect. It is proposed to follow in the future the subdivision for genetic mutations as elaborated by van Grouw. He distinguished between albinism (no production of melanin pigments at all, neither for feathers nor for bare parts, nor for the eyes), total leucism (no delivery of melanin to feathers and possibly not to bare parts, but presence in the eyes), partial leucism (not all feathers are affected, the eyes are not affected), brown (qualitative reduc- tion of eumelanin only), ino (qualitative reduction of both eu- and phaeomelanin), dilution (quantitative reduction of melanin(s)) and different forms of melanism (in most cases, increased quantity of melanin). Besides, field ornithologists must be aware that not all aberrations are triggered by the genetic mutations described above. In many cases, an abnormal appearance is the result of progressive greying. Also, a correct assessment of the cause for an aberration is often difficult and not possible in all cases. It is therefore useful to always provide a complete description of aberrant birds. In addition, more data about life time histories of affected individuals are requested.
André Konter; Regulus Wissenschaftliche Berichte Nr 29. 2014
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