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Old Tuesday 31st May 2011, 20:16   #11951
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I hope Phil knows the Sculthorpe Golden Pheasants are not part of any self-sustaining feral population so wouldn't qualify for ticking any more than an escaped budgie.

But while we're talking about escaped (or deliberately released) birds, does anyone know if the Eagle Owl at Hunstanton is still knocking around?
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Old Tuesday 31st May 2011, 21:52   #11952
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave Appleton View Post
But while we're talking about escaped (or deliberately released) birds, does anyone know if the Eagle Owl at Hunstanton is still knocking around?
I have looked for it a couple of times and not seen it Dave. I have just emailed my local contact and will let you know their reply.

Cheers Penny

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Old Tuesday 31st May 2011, 22:26   #11953
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I have looked for it a couple of times and not seen it Dave. I have just emailed my local contact and will let you know their reply.

Cheers Penny
Just got a reply back:

"Sorry to have to report that the owl seems to have gone. Hopefully it has moved on to a more appropriate environs."

When they saw it last they "thought it looked rather uneasy; standing back to the wind, feathers all over its face and shifting its feet a lot."

The lady who emailed me has also asked if I could let her know if anyone else sees it again please.

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Old Tuesday 31st May 2011, 22:59   #11954
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Thanks Penny!
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Old Tuesday 31st May 2011, 23:32   #11955
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave Appleton View Post
I hope Phil knows the Sculthorpe Golden Pheasants are not part of any self-sustaining feral population so wouldn't qualify for ticking any more than an escaped budgie.

But while we're talking about escaped (or deliberately released) birds, does anyone know if the Eagle Owl at Hunstanton is still knocking around?
Didn't realise that the Sculthorpe birds were not countable, all Golden Pheasants are dodgy though aren't they?? Although the Woolferton birds are self-sustaining, some of them are supposed to be hybrids (so I am told anyway).

If the Woolferton birds are countable then, have they been reported lately. I think they are much easier to see in the Winter though??

Early mornings/Evenings best??

Cheers
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Old Wednesday 1st June 2011, 00:08   #11956
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Didn't realise that the Sculthorpe birds were not countable, all Golden Pheasants are dodgy though aren't they?? Although the Woolferton birds are self-sustaining, some of them are supposed to be hybrids (so I am told anyway).

If the Woolferton birds are countable then, have they been reported lately. I think they are much easier to see in the Winter though??

Early mornings/Evenings best??

Cheers
Well, they're all non-native, so dodgy in that respect, but as the Breckland and Wolferton birds were breeding in the wild and, for a while, maintained a healthy self-sustaining population they were added to category C of the British (and Norfolk) list and are therefore considered countable by most listers. In fact both the Breckland and Wolferton populations are in serious decline and I wouldn't be surprised if they don't prove to be self-sustaining in the long term. With smaller numbers they have a reduced gene pool and both populations have started to develop mutations, especially at Wolferton, where as far as I know all birds now have dark throats (var. 'obscurus', often seen in captive birds). I believe UK400 Club no longer accepts the Wolferton birds, though in my opinion there isn't really any more justification for treating them differently from the Breckland birds, at least some of which are also showing dark throats, albeit not so obviously as at Wolferton.

The Sculthorpe birds are a different kettle of fish. They are reported to have been deliberately released (I'm not going to speculate why...). Even if that assertion turned out to be unfounded and they weren't released there, then they must at best be escapees. I think we can be pretty certain that they didn't make their own way there from any self-sustaining feral population.

The Wolferton birds are usually easier to see in winter or better in early spring, but you have a chance at any time of year. I'm not aware of recent reports apart from the one mentioned by Frootshoot above, but that doesn't mean they aren't being seen. I don't think many people look for them at this time of year. But they can be difficult at the best of times, so don't get your hopes up too much!
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Old Wednesday 1st June 2011, 00:24   #11957
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Although the Woolferton birds are self-sustaining, some of them are supposed to be hybrids (so I am told anyway).
So far as I can tell the claims that the Wolferton birds are hybrids were based on a belief that dark throats are a sign of hybridisation with Lady Amherst's Pheasant. This can be the case, I think, but my understanding is that it can also arise through mutation without any input from Lady A's. Mutants are most likely to appear in tiny populations with limited gene pool and consequent in-breeding, which is, I presume, why such mutant birds are frequent in captive and small feral populations and not so apparent in larger healthy feral (or wild) populations. There aren't any Lady Amherst's Pheasants in the Wolferton area, so hybridisation is unlikely. There was a suggestion that a Golden x Common Pheasant hybrid had been seen there but I never saw any evidence for this - it's a most unusual hybrid even in captivity.
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Old Wednesday 1st June 2011, 08:50   #11958
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I'm a bit of a Sandpiper fan,and I see that the Broad-billed has again been reported from Breydon Water again today.Described as being on the north side from hide on rising tide.Those that know these things- is this bird accessible if I park at Asda,and would the tides be favourable mornings or afternoons? Thanks in advance on this one.
Cheers,
Jim.
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Old Wednesday 1st June 2011, 12:34   #11959
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Broad-billed

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I'm a bit of a Sandpiper fan,and I see that the Broad-billed has again been reported from Breydon Water again today.Described as being on the north side from hide on rising tide.Those that know these things- is this bird accessible if I park at Asda,and would the tides be favourable mornings or afternoons? Thanks in advance on this one.
Cheers,
Jim.
I few people all around Breydon scaning from both the rugby club and the asda side when I drove past at 12 the tide seemed to be high at present
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Old Wednesday 1st June 2011, 18:54   #11960
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"The Sculthorpe birds are a different kettle of fish. They are reported to have been deliberately released (I'm not going to speculate why...). Even if that assertion turned out to be unfounded and they weren't released there, then they must at best be escapees. I think we can be pretty certain that they didn't make their own way there from any self-sustaining feral population."

It is not a secret around these parts that a resident from the quaint town of Fakenham released the birds a couple or three years ago and this was a bit of a topic for a while as to whether he / they should have been prosecuted etc, etc....but time and things move on. Pleased to say that we have two pairs of spotted flycatchers on nests and turtle doves only a stones throw from the outskirts of pretty Fakenham. Quail still calling early morning today at Swanton Novers raptorless watchpoint, and adult mediterranean gull "flycatching" Monday mid morning but no sign of any honey buzzards there.
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Old Wednesday 1st June 2011, 19:33   #11961
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I few people all around Breydon scaning from both the rugby club and the asda side when I drove past at 12 the tide seemed to be high at present
Cheers Gary, got onto the bird mid-afternoon; but it wasn't keen on giving itself up too easily!
Myself and another birder (from Ipswich) called the Broad-billed at almost exactly the same time, we had satisfactory but brief views. A group of birders then arrived, and we were unable to get them onto the bird at first since everything turned out to be a Dunlin, and our bird had presumably retired to the channel and deeper mud flats.
There was something else out there that none of us could ID with any certainty. It was pale underneath, less rufous on top, with a drooping bill. It looked relatively long-legged, similar in size to the Dunlin. The tail seemed 'stunted'. Any ideas?! Sanderling, a second Broad-billed and Dunlin were all discussed at the time. Some on site believed this Broad-billed to be a different individual to the one seen 27th-28th May, so maybe that was what we saw.
Anyway, THE Broad-Billed Sandpiper did eventually offer good views, as usual with tricky birds it showed well on the way back to the car, after having hiked a little further than I had realised/intended. Great looking bird, head pattern not dissimilar to Common Snipe, also a more methodical feeder than the Dunlin.
Cheers,
Jim.

ps bird was seen in Suffolk, but later flew in the direction of Norfolk!
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Old Wednesday 1st June 2011, 23:20   #11962
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Found a Spotted Flycatcher in the 'Collared Flycatcher' Tree at Holme today and a stunning Grey Wagtail dropped in briefly in front of NOA Redwell Marsh Hide.

See blog for full update.


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Old Thursday 2nd June 2011, 16:31   #11963
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[quote=Dave Appleton;2156353]
The Sculthorpe birds are a different kettle of fish. They are reported to have been deliberately released (I'm not going to speculate why...). Even if that assertion turned out to be unfounded and they weren't released there, then they must at best be escapees. I think we can be pretty certain that they didn't make their own way there from any self-sustaining feral population.

A couple of years ago, someone "dumped" a Peacock and two Peahens in Hempnall Village. One of the Peahens disappeared quite quickly and the remaining pair were left to their own devices. Over the summer they successfully bred and reared four or five young to juvenile age. Some of the locals didn't like the idea of resident Peacocks in the village, the main two reasons explained to me being poo and noise, so I believe all were captured and re-homed on some nice estate somewhere. It was a pleasing distraction from work though and helped me through the hot summer months.
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Old Thursday 2nd June 2011, 20:50   #11964
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Pyrtle , the Swanton Novers watchpoint is far from raptorless. No honey buzzards yet true , ( apart from a displaying male a few weeks ago ) but common buzzards are aproaching plauge levels. Joking of course , but 10 - 12 birds in the air at once most days ( and this before any young have fledged ) and up to 18 recorded some days. One observer recorded 135 common buzzard sightings in a couple of hours . Red kite regulary being picked up too along with kestrel , sparrowhawk and hobby. But the early hours when the quail are calling is not the best time of day for raptors.
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Old Thursday 2nd June 2011, 23:08   #11965
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Strumpshaw Fen Rspb

Fabulous day here - best ever photographs of Swallowtails.

Full update now on blog.


Penny

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Old Friday 3rd June 2011, 00:12   #11966
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Broad billed sand best viewed from south side of river. Ok views this evening. Assess from rugby club track.
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Old Friday 3rd June 2011, 11:47   #11967
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Beautiful evening at Surlingham Church Marsh yesterday. 2 Barn Owls were seen, one flew by very close, glancing over in my direction before continuing on its way. Both birds were seen carrying food, if only I had means to follow them!
The Grasshopper Warblers that have been silent for some time put on a show for me as dusk fell. 4 Birds were reeling on the reserve, and another over the river. I actually managed decent views of one individual, and I would urge others to check out these birds whilst they are still reeling.
As passerine activity dropped off, Egyptian Geese and Gadwall flew in to roost on the lagoon. Around the church ruins, a number of bats were feeding. Some were small enough to be Pips, although a couple of larger individuals looked akin to Natterer; although until I actually purchase a detector I won't know for sure.
A late drive, stopping to listen, round Surlingham, Rockland and Claxton was sadly uneventful, but Quail seem to be arriving all the time so I will try again in a week or so.
Cheers,
Jim
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Old Friday 3rd June 2011, 19:53   #11968
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Is the eagle owl still at large in Hunstanton? Twice this week I have had brief views of a very large owl almost buzzard sized with a pale brown back and both in good light before sunset and about 9.30 this morning , but on both occasions I was unable to get the bins on it.
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Old Friday 3rd June 2011, 22:20   #11969
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Is the eagle owl still at large in Hunstanton? Twice this week I have had brief views of a very large owl almost buzzard sized with a pale brown back and both in good light before sunset and about 9.30 this morning , but on both occasions I was unable to get the bins on it.
See my post at the top of this page: http://www.birdforum.net/showpost.ph...ostcount=11953
Could still be around though!
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Old Saturday 4th June 2011, 10:08   #11970
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hey Guys, my blog has moved to www.showingwell.com

I am still in the depths of sorting it out so please forgive its basic form at the moment.

If you would like your own site or blog added to the links section please inbox me and I will be more than happy to add you on.

Cheers guys and happy birding
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Old Saturday 4th June 2011, 10:57   #11971
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Thanks Penny , It looks a distinct possibility for a bird I have been seeing at Swanton Novers during the week.
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Old Saturday 4th June 2011, 13:08   #11972
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Pyrtle , the Swanton Novers watchpoint is far from raptorless. One observer recorded 135 common buzzard sightings in a couple of hours . But the early hours when the quail are calling is not the best time of day for raptors.
Umm, one buzzard being seen 135 times in two hours is still one buzzard...I appreciate that up to 12 birds in one count may have been recorded. We heard the quail on Monday at about 1130 through to midday, optimum time for hbs at this site? Additionally Tideliner, is it an accepted theory or proven that if a goshawk or two is holding territory at a site that the chances of hbs in that area ( particularly a breeding pair) is drastically curtailed or even not going to happen?
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Old Saturday 4th June 2011, 18:14   #11973
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Is the eagle owl still at large in Hunstanton? Twice this week I have had brief views of a very large owl almost buzzard sized with a pale brown back and both in good light before sunset and about 9.30 this morning , but on both occasions I was unable to get the bins on it.
Eagle Owl still in Hunstanton today.
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Old Saturday 4th June 2011, 18:22   #11974
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Eagle Owl still in Hunstanton today.
Do you know where? I might take a look during my lunch breaks next week. Ta.
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Old Saturday 4th June 2011, 20:55   #11975
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Honey buzzards and goshawks do not mix in the average wood. Perhaps they can get by in a huge forest , but its less likely in North Norfolks fragmented woodlands.There was a study done in Sweden where they found no large forest raptors would nest within 2.5 km of a goshawk nest.
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