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Old Friday 30th September 2011, 08:29   #13301
stuart white
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Looking at the OS map, the whole site seems to be accessible by public footpaths. Can anyone with local knowledge enlighten me - why is it necessary to obtain a permit to walk on public footpaths at Cantley?
Becasue its a working factory and local birders have a 30/40 year relationship with the site ? Probably not worth trashing.

All very straight forward, just walk up to the security office inside the gate with bins round your neck and they will most likely say "ah birdwatching are we" and give you a pass.
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Old Friday 30th September 2011, 13:03   #13302
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Not only a private, busy and dangerous site but also a lot of hard work has gone into the good relationship between the owners and local birdwatchers. Duty of care, etc, etc. Please don't mess this up by suggesting that permits or signing in is not required. Thank you.
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Old Friday 30th September 2011, 14:00   #13303
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Looking at the OS map, the whole site seems to be accessible by public footpaths. Can anyone with local knowledge enlighten me - why is it necessary to obtain a permit to walk on public footpaths at Cantley?
A fair and honest question if you just look at a map, though as you'll have picked up from the responses, the situation on the ground is different. If you look on Google Maps you'll see that the only way to follow the footpath is to walk through the main access area to the beet factory, as this goes right up to the river.

Popping in to the office is therefore both a basic courtesy and essential from a safety POV. I don't think you can see all the pits from the public footpath, so you need permission to access them to get the most out of a visit anyway (even if you made the long walk in from the south).

Don't let any of the above put you off from a visit - signing in is a piece of cake and actually adds to the experience (OK so maybe only the first couple of times but it is more 'interesting' that pulling in to the CP at Cley...).

There's a sign at the entrance to the factory which spells it out (Google Maps photo, before I'm accused of lorry-spotting)
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Old Friday 30th September 2011, 15:02   #13304
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I understand the bird in question is a Simon's petrel!!
I hope you’re not saying Simon’s some kind of fuel.

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Originally Posted by Nick Moran View Post
before I'm accused of lorry-spotting)
Pity your photo wasn’t of a Richard’s Pipit, Nick !

Today, I wore the same, tropical-weight clobber as for Texas at Easter and Spain last month. I was still sweating. This hot spell is both remarkable and has left us northern East Anglian birders with an ‘embarrassing’ lack of birds- to quote one of our élite.

I can’t see that a sudden cold snap from the Arctic will have us treading on too many Yellow-broweds, either.

Visits to several of my usual haunts (Salthouse, Warham Greens, Wells Woods) produced not one warbler, but several Redpolls and Siskins. It is so demoralising.
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Old Friday 30th September 2011, 16:12   #13305
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Titchwell September 30th

Today’s highlights

Spotted flycatcher – 1 in carpark
Little gull – 4 offshore
Slavonian grebe – 1 offshore
Little stint – 3 on fresh marsh
Greenshank – 2 on fresh marsh
Golden plover – 350 on fresh marsh

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Old Friday 30th September 2011, 19:13   #13306
dwholden
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the only way to follow the footpath is to walk through the main access area to the beet factory, as this goes right up to the river.

Popping in to the office is therefore both a basic courtesy and essential from a safety POV. I don't think you can see all the pits from the public footpath, so you need permission to access them to get the most out of a visit anyway
Thanks Nick, exactly the informative reply I was after!
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Old Saturday 1st October 2011, 08:06   #13307
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Cantley

Since I have not visited this site for several years, perhaps those with more up-to-date knowledge can enlighten all who wish to visit.

I was told that, on occasion, pits are closed, for H&S reasons.

Also that, sometimes, there is no access for birders at all. Possibly, for similar reasons.

This link to the Pdf provides general info concerning the more industrial side of things:
http://www.britishsugar.co.uk/Files/...ctory-pdf.aspx
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Old Saturday 1st October 2011, 08:17   #13308
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Also understand there is a Simon's flycatcher.

Last edited by black kite 1964 : Saturday 1st October 2011 at 09:11.
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Old Saturday 1st October 2011, 15:56   #13309
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Buzzard sp

Good afternoon everyone,

Whilst at Cley last weekend I noticed a Buzzard sp quickly losing altitude from the sea moving over north scrape, although the weather conditions limited me to only a silhouette. The first thing that struck me was the length of the birds tail and how rounded it seemed. Honey Buzzard is bird I am only familiar with in literature and not in the field, so I didn't want to bring it heavily in to consideration. Also I am aware that Common Buzzard can produce this compact stance and with the bird lowering so fast off the sea I presumed that this 'shape' was due to this fact. The way the bird had its wings folded creating a angle from the carpel joint to the body may be exaggerating the amount of 'neck' this bird is showing, although again I am very unsure. I was wondering if anyone could shine any light on the bird for me.I should have really brought this to attention sooner but I have been in the field all week and only just had a chance to go through the shots Leila took of the bird.

Regards Kieran

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Old Saturday 1st October 2011, 16:06   #13310
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Titchwell October 1st

Today’s highlights

Little stint – 1 on fresh marsh
Lapland bunting – 4 on fresh marsh this morning before flying towards beach
Red necked grebe – 1 offshore
Knot – 4000 on beach

Paul
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Old Saturday 1st October 2011, 19:46   #13311
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Originally Posted by Locostella View Post
Good afternoon everyone,

Whilst at Cley last weekend I noticed a Buzzard sp quickly losing altitude from the sea moving over north scrape, although the weather conditions limited me to only a silhouette. The first thing that struck me was the length of the birds tail and how rounded it seemed. Honey Buzzard is bird I am only familiar with in literature and not in the field, so I didn't want to bring it heavily in to consideration. Also I am aware that Common Buzzard can produce this compact stance and with the bird lowering so fast off the sea I presumed that this 'shape' was due to this fact. The way the bird had its wings folded creating a angle from the carpel joint to the body may be exaggerating the amount of 'neck' this bird is showing, although again I am very unsure. I was wondering if anyone could shine any light on the bird for me.I should have really brought this to attention sooner but I have been in the field all week and only just had a chance to go through the shots Leila took of the bird.

Regards Kieran

Attachment 350006
Looks interesting for Honey, Kieran, esp as you say tail length and shape, but difficult to get any detail on plumage (noticed you've put this in the id section as well and if CAU speaks, I usually listen!) Will be interesting to hear what others think! Tideliner are you about?!?
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Old Saturday 1st October 2011, 19:54   #13312
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Cheers David!

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Originally Posted by David Norgate View Post
Looks interesting for Honey, Kieran, esp as you say tail length and shape, but difficult to get any detail on plumage (noticed you've put this in the id section as well and if CAU speaks, I usually listen!) Will be interesting to hear what others think! Tideliner are you about?!?
CAU seems to be leaning towards Marsh Harrier, if I am honest I didn't think too hard about this as I watched the bird come directly over north bank and presumably off the sea. due to the lack of detail picked up in the picture it may never be 100% confirmed as anything. I just found the shape very intriguing. Cheers for replying David and was good to see you the other day.

Regards Kieran
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Old Saturday 1st October 2011, 21:04   #13313
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Hmmmmm....
Looks pretty similar to this Marsh Harrier at Strump..... Or it could be a Buzzard!
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Old Sunday 2nd October 2011, 08:23   #13314
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Hmmmmm....
Looks pretty similar to this Marsh Harrier at Strump..... Or it could be a Buzzard!
This picture side by side certainly adds weight to the MH camp, cheers buddy.

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Old Sunday 2nd October 2011, 15:39   #13315
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Stooping silhouettes like this are not easy , the whole shape of the bird seems to change. Tail is longish for a common buzzard and rather rounded , but this could be due to moult , but its a little on the short side for a honey ( but the angle of the photo can cause this effect ) and to me the whole body looks heavy for a marsh harrier.

I cant be sure , but I am leaning towards a common buzzard , mainly because of the thick set neck , but it would be nice to see a few more photos of it if there any . A description of the flight of the bird as it flew on would be very useful.
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Old Sunday 2nd October 2011, 16:42   #13316
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Three Barnacle geese in with some canadas at cley today. Are they likely to be wild ones or escapes do you think?
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Old Sunday 2nd October 2011, 17:02   #13317
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I had a little play in Photoshop (click on the image).......someone more skilled and/or with the original image could for sure bring out more plumage detail.

Dave
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Old Sunday 2nd October 2011, 17:05   #13318
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Looks like a marshie to me.
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Old Sunday 2nd October 2011, 17:45   #13319
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Three Barnacle geese in with some canadas at cley today. Are they likely to be wild ones or escapes do you think?
I was wondering this also. Saw them the week before last. There's been brents and pinkfeet moving over the last few weeks, but maybe it's a little early for barnies?
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Old Sunday 2nd October 2011, 19:53   #13320
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Barred Warbler at Holme at 9.47am found by Mark Bradberry. Nice little seawatch afterwards and then a twitch to Suffolk to see the stunning Sandhill Crane!!!! Awesome day!!!

Full update and pics on blog later. Back home now, but too tired to look at any pictures, never mind add them to blog!

Penny

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Old Monday 3rd October 2011, 12:19   #13321
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The one that got away!!

Unfortunatly the sandhill crane was seen in Norfolk!

A couple have been into the Snettisham office with a photo of a bird they couldn't ID but did know it was kind of crane. The bird was on the mud off the Coastal Park at ca 13:00. There were quite a few people who had arrived late for the high-tide spectacular but no-one knew what the bird was. I don't know how long the bird was present or which direction it flew off in.

Hopefully it will do the same as the WTE and head back north soon
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Old Monday 3rd October 2011, 13:23   #13322
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Unfortunatly the sandhill crane was seen in Norfolk!

A couple have been into the Snettisham office with a photo of a bird they couldn't ID but did know it was kind of crane. The bird was on the mud off the Coastal Park at ca 13:00. There were quite a few people who had arrived late for the high-tide spectacular but no-one knew what the bird was. I don't know how long the bird was present or which direction it flew off in.

Hopefully it will do the same as the WTE and head back north soon
Ho humm! The benefits (and pain) of the photographic revolution! Shame these people who photograph birds don't know what they are looking at (Yes, I know the arguements...why should they etc, etc ... we don't have a given right... etc, etc ... but, boy, it would have been nice to se in Norfolk!!)
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Old Monday 3rd October 2011, 14:07   #13323
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Ho humm! The benefits (and pain) of the photographic revolution! Shame these people who photograph birds don't know what they are looking at (Yes, I know the arguements...why should they etc, etc ... we don't have a given right... etc, etc ... but, boy, it would have been nice to se in Norfolk!!)
It certainly would have been, but thankfully it is now on the Norfolk list and adds to our rich history of rare birds. I was surpised that no-one had seemingly picked it up; indeed, someone did! I wonder if the bird continued round the coast (but surely seawatchers would have spotted it?) or perhaps it flew inland (more coverage here though).
Still, one for the record books. And what a bird! certainly commands that wow factor. On arrival in Boyton yesterday, folk sprinting up the lane, fist pumping, a well organised car-park and views of the bird down to less than 100m.
Cheers,
Jim.
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Old Monday 3rd October 2011, 14:24   #13324
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Hopefully it will do the same as the WTE and head back north soon
I fully echo your sentiment Paul but I fear that, being October not April, this is most unlikely to happen. I am more than happy to be proven wrong though!

As for it's route from Snettisham...? I personally don't believe it coasted - I'm sure someone would've picked it up - but is more likely to have travelled 'cross country' and perhaps latched onto the course of the Waveney. It may well have stopped off again somewhere in the Waveney valley, roosted and then continued the same course on Sunday morning before turning south in the Lowestoft area. Pure conjecture of course...

I know it's a big bird but Norfolk is an awfully big county.

James
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Old Monday 3rd October 2011, 14:34   #13325
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Swift by name, swift by nature...

I saw 2 Swifts over Happisburgh just before noon today but they didn't, unfortunately, hang around for me to 'check'em out' so to speak. In my brief view they looked very dark, very sharp winged and they shipped off very fast westwards along the cliff. Just to clarify the RBA message they were 'definite Swift sp., probably Common' rather than 'probable Swifts'. Not quite sure how I worded my message to them but I hate leaving answer-phone messages anyway!

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