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Old Tuesday 21st March 2017, 00:36   #126
Theo98
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Cool

Quote:
Originally Posted by Richken View Post
...This is the first night since getting these Canons that we have had a sky clear of clouds and I've just darted out mid reply to spent a few minutes looking at the stars. This really does show very clearly how fantastic the IS facility is! Without IS on it was totally useless hand holding, but on it was a transformation with the stars showing very clearly as well defined points of light which was a great relief to me...

Cheers Richard
Richard,

I believe your professional career in photography and printing services uniquely qualifies your observations and opinions in the optical realm. I shot semi-pro for 2-3 years around 2005 and greatly appreciated that I had Much to learn, but had no guidance or mentoring and consequently just amateur success. It was a lot of fun, still have all of my Canon L-glass. Now I'm retired and should jump back into it as an enjoyable hobby but alas, already have too many of them to support!

If possible, hang on to the 10X42L, putting it through its paces and trials. Your CA sensitivity may not go away, but the optical virtues it does present could smooth over and temper those issues, allowing full enjoyment of terrestrial and astronomical heavenly views!

Enjoy,

Ted
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Old Tuesday 21st March 2017, 04:38   #127
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Thanks Ted.

Yes I did read your posts regarding your interesting viewing problem. I am reasonably reconciled to the prospect of having to ignore the CA that I am seeing in some subject/lighting situations. I very much appreciate reading the feedback from this forum where those posting to this thread have very more experience of the Canon 10x42L IS WP than I have and what is reasonable to expect.

Cheers Richard

Richard,

I had the opportunity to compare a Canon 10x42L IS WP with my Nikon 10x32 EDG for about 15 minutes while I was birding on the deck at Cape May Point, New Jersey a couple of years ago.

When the IS is on while using it I think it would be reasonable for you to expect the best hand held view you will ever have from any 10x binocular!

I could only approach its view with my Nikon 10x32 EDG when I braced both my elbows on the deck's railing while using it.

Bob
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Old Tuesday 21st March 2017, 06:47   #128
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Richard,

I'd dare say that your problems with the Canon and CA come from your expertise in seeing and understanding CA combined with the fact that image stabilization allows one to much more easily see not just detail in the observed image but also any and all optical defects in the instrument.

I have directly compared the Canon 10x42 L IS with all the other top binoculars, and can say that you are not going to find a model that would have significantly less CA. For a CA-free view, you need to view with one of the few premium spotting scopes available, and at low enough magnifications.

Kimmo
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Old Tuesday 21st March 2017, 19:43   #129
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I bet it has to do the IPD setting..... The eyecups shape and diameter of them plus the lack of a simple center hinge make getting the IPD on the Canon more difficult. I also experienced lots of CA on my first go with the Canon 10x42.

Here is a tip and how I set the IPD on all my bins.

I look at a CA problem area (bare branches, telephone lines, roof edges, etc.) and move the IPD in and out until I get the best CA free center field image.
Its amazing how much 1mm or less in IPD can make on CA performance.
FWIW I find the Canon 10x42 is excellent at controlling CA, and when it comes to CA its better than my Nikon SE 10x42.....
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Old Tuesday 28th March 2017, 12:27   #130
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Guys rather than clogging up the forum with lots of short replies may I make just the one reply.

I've been using the binoculars for a few outings now and like them a lot and am sure that they were the correct choice. Yesterday I was in a hide watching wading birds and was amazed to note that even when with my arms supported firmly on the shelf that switching on the IS there was a distinct improvement in the image, which just goes to show that it only takes a very slightest body tremor to degrade the image quality.

I was watching a heron with the water quite well lit and was surprised to see quite significant CA down it's right side with the bird in the middle of the field of view. Your comment would be appreciated. I'm sure that I had the eye pieces set up correctly as I had plenty of time to mess around.

I greatly value all of your suggestions and tips.

Cheers Richard
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Old Tuesday 28th March 2017, 14:50   #131
Theo98
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Originally Posted by Richken View Post
I was watching a heron with the water quite well lit and was surprised to see quite significant CA down it's right side with the bird in the middle of the field of view. Your comment would be appreciated. I'm sure that I had the eye pieces set up correctly as I had plenty of time to mess around.

I greatly value all of your suggestions and tips.

Cheers Richard
Richard,

If you mean quite well lit, as in a very high contrast area, even I'd expect to notice some form of CA. Without a pic, very hard to determine what were the lighting dynamics of the overall scene. Personally, I can see with regular vision substantial CA on the water while fishing and facing the horizon, typically with a high noon sun that "lights" the still water with a mirror-like glass glaze. Objects (corks, birds, branches, etc.) that become well under-lit can start displaying stark edge distortions, mostly in the form of CA smears. At times, this situation can appear on a very clear bright day, or even on a bright cloudy day. Then, I pop on my Polarized UVA\B sunglasses and vision returns to normal.

Your day and situation I'm sure, were very different. However, with your understanding, recognition and sensitivity for CA, no doubt you will find certain views that could be disappointments...but are the 10X42L's IS\optical virtues "good-enough" to please 99% of your glassing time to be called, "keepers"?

Ted
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Old Tuesday 28th March 2017, 14:52   #132
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Richard,
If the IS was on I would expect one sided CA to be visible on the central Heron.
With IS off I suppose it could settle with the prisms slightly off centre. There is about a one degree maximum shift in the prisms.
It could be that the collimation process has moved one side slightly off centre.
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Old Thursday 30th March 2017, 13:49   #133
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Today I tried to see CA centrally with the 10x42 IS. It was difficult.
However, if one barrel was slightly out of focus I could see CA. I think because my accommodation is small.

The Canon is a short focus instrument. It has many lens elements. These elements will be slightly off centre, slightly wedge shaped. The spacing slightly wrong. The glass mixture slightly wrong also. Everything may be in tolerance but nothing is perfect.

There may be floating focus elements.

The centres of our pupils are not exactly on the optical axes of our eyes. Our eyes have CA. They may not be exactly on the binocular optical axis. This binocular optical axis may wobble slightly.

There are so many variables.

I wonder if CA would be seen with a Newtonian reflector.

A senior optical lecturer told me that even Newtonians can show slight CA if one looks carefully enough. But I cannot remember the reason.

I can see very subtle differences in shades of fabrics, but I don't see the subtle changes reported here by birdwatchers. My eyes are not trained for this.

Professional photographers I think stop down their taking optics a lot to get the best results. I routinely use my lenses at f/1.4 and f/1.2 and get very nice images.

Last edited by Binastro : Thursday 30th March 2017 at 13:52.
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Old Monday 10th April 2017, 15:32   #134
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Today I tried to see CA centrally with the 10x42 IS. It was difficult.
However, if one barrel was slightly out of focus I could see CA. I think because my accommodation is small.

The Canon is a short focus instrument. It has many lens elements. These elements will be slightly off centre, slightly wedge shaped. The spacing slightly wrong. The glass mixture slightly wrong also. Everything may be in tolerance but nothing is perfect.

There may be floating focus elements.

The centres of our pupils are not exactly on the optical axes of our eyes. Our eyes have CA. They may not be exactly on the binocular optical axis. This binocular optical axis may wobble slightly.

There are so many variables.

I wonder if CA would be seen with a Newtonian reflector.

A senior optical lecturer told me that even Newtonians can show slight CA if one looks carefully enough. But I cannot remember the reason.

I can see very subtle differences in shades of fabrics, but I don't see the subtle changes reported here by birdwatchers. My eyes are not trained for this.

Professional photographers I think stop down their taking optics a lot to get the best results. I routinely use my lenses at f/1.4 and f/1.2 and get very nice images.
Many thanks for your posting. You or others may be interested in doing the x-rite colour blindness test. http://xritephoto.com/online-color-test-challenge

Yes as regards to stopping down lenses there is a sweet spot for all lenses for in particular sharpness and it is different for each lens design as would be expected.

I've now had quite a bit of time with these binoculars and am quite happy with them. I'm getting a huge amount of pleasure from using them for a wide range of subjcts even if they are a bit heavy when they are slung round my neck. I have got myself a wide non brand neck strap as I felt that the Canon one could draw too much attention to them<G>

Thanks everyone for your very useful comments.

Cheers Richard
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Old Monday 10th April 2017, 17:01   #135
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Many thanks for your posting. You or others may be interested in doing the x-rite colour blindness test. http://xritephoto.com/online-color-test-challenge

Yes as regards to stopping down lenses there is a sweet spot for all lenses for in particular sharpness and it is different for each lens design as would be expected.

I've now had quite a bit of time with these binoculars and am quite happy with them. I'm getting a huge amount of pleasure from using them for a wide range of subjects even if they are a bit heavy when they are slung round my neck. I have got myself a wide non brand neck strap as I felt that the Canon one could draw too much attention to them<G>

Thanks everyone for your very useful comments.

Cheers Richard
Great news, Richard!

Nice to hear others enjoying and appreciating their optical prowess. If one can get by their ergonomic quirks, the on going optical rewards of the Canon 10X42L IS are many and the areas of application very diverse!

Appreciate the link to the "X-Rite Color Test", very interesting! My first attempt scored a 12, so I stopped there...not perfect, but good enough for me!!

Ted
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Old Monday 10th April 2017, 17:55   #136
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I've now had quite a bit of time with these binoculars and am quite happy with them. I'm getting a huge amount of pleasure from using them for a wide range of subjcts even if they are a bit heavy when they are slung round my neck. I have got myself a wide non brand neck strap as I felt that the Canon one could draw too much attention to them<G>

Cheers Richard
A comfortable and low cost but hassle free way to heft the Canon's weight is the Op-Tech utility strap. It is a continuous loop with sliding clips for connection to the matching clips on your glass.
Use the XL uni-loop clips, as that allows the strap to remain at some distance from your face when you raise the glass to your eyes.
The arrangement ensures that your optics won't hit the deck when one of the clips gives way. Also it is easy to take the glass off, unlike when a harness is involved. The strap is 1" flat nylon, with a 2.75" wide neoprene shoulder section.
I have this kit for both my Canon 10x42 as well as for my scope, a little Nikon ED-50 on a monopod.
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Old Tuesday 11th April 2017, 18:51   #137
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A comfortable and low cost but hassle free way to heft the Canon's weight is the Op-Tech utility strap. It is a continuous loop with sliding clips for connection to the matching clips on your glass.
Use the XL uni-loop clips, as that allows the strap to remain at some distance from your face when you raise the glass to your eyes.
The arrangement ensures that your optics won't hit the deck when one of the clips gives way. Also it is easy to take the glass off, unlike when a harness is involved. The strap is 1" flat nylon, with a 2.75" wide neoprene shoulder section.
I have this kit for both my Canon 10x42 as well as for my scope, a little Nikon ED-50 on a monopod.
Many thanks everyone and thanks for your suggestion which sounds like an excellent insurance policy as the idea of the binns falling to the ground would be terrible!

Cheers
Richard
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Old Saturday 29th April 2017, 01:05   #138
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I will say this... I'm starting to carry the Canon IS 10X42 along with my primary 7X42/8X42 more and more. It's a great combination. For sure the Canon has never failed me.
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Old Saturday 29th April 2017, 01:30   #139
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I will say this... I'm starting to carry the Canon IS 10X42 along with my primary 7X42/8X42 more and more. It's a great combination. For sure the Canon has never failed me.
WOW, 100+oz (about 3K grams) around the neck for a days birding excursion...You Da Man, Chuck!

Except for the slow focus speed (900 degrees CF to Inf.), the 10X42L IS could easily be my main birding instrument. However, I can see my FL 7X42 augmenting a search, then switching to my IS 10X for a positive ID, but forget the in-between 8X carry!!

Ted
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Old Friday 5th May 2017, 22:36   #140
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Just to say that I'm getting so much pleasure from these binoculars and to be able to watch for an hour or two and feel no discomfort what so ever is fantastic. The IS is so good that I wonder why more makers ignore it's benefit in giving a superior viewing experience.

Best wishes all. Richard
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