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Old Monday 2nd July 2007, 19:54   #1
Surreybirder
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Micro ID - look here first

There are so many requests for micro IDs - and so many of them keep coming up - that I wondered whether it might be a good idea to have a micro ID thread.
My idea is that all who would like to should post pictures of some of the commoner, easier micros that most moth'ers will catch. If it works, all who want to should be able gradually to learn some of the commoner species - and hopefully be better equipped to know when something less common or harder to ID comes along.
I don't, personally, have masses of great micro photos but I thought I'd start with ones that I have that are reasonably common at this time of the year.

After discussion with robinm from the mods we have agreed that in order to keep this thread as clear as possible any posts that are not photos of micros with an id will be removed or moved. If you disagree with any ids please post here but any such posts will be removed once the id has been agreed.

If anyone else thinks this is a good idea, please post your pix!
Ken

Agapeta hamana
Aphomia sociella
Archips xylosteana
Aleimma loeflingiana
do. (ligher exampel)
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Old Monday 2nd July 2007, 20:05   #2
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Let me know if I've got any of them wrong!

Anthophila fabriciana
Pseudargyrotoza conwagana
Chrysoteuchia culmella (Thanks, Angus)
Epiphyas postvittana
Hofmannophila pseudospretella
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Old Monday 2nd July 2007, 20:10   #3
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Plutella xylostella
Pyrausta aurata
Udea olivalis
Celypha lacunana
do.


That's me - all micro-ed out.
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Old Tuesday 3rd July 2007, 10:25   #4
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Esperia sulphurella

A common and pretty dayflying moth seen mostly in April. Hangs around rotting wood but can turn up anywhere.
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Old Tuesday 3rd July 2007, 20:50   #5
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Here's a few more:
20-plume moth (2 examples) - Alucita hexadactyla - can be seen at almost any time of the year
Elophila nymphaeata - brown china-mark
Epiblema cynosbatella - flies in May and June - distinctive orange 'punk' hair-do!
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Old Tuesday 3rd July 2007, 21:44   #6
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OK, some from me:

0246 Tinea semifulvella
0247 Tinea trinotella
0450 Scythropia crataegella
0483 Epermenia chaerophyllella
0640 Batia lunaris

More when I get time.

David
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Old Tuesday 3rd July 2007, 21:57   #7
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Here's one which was identified by Charly which I got last week;
Chrysoteuchia culmella
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Old Tuesday 3rd July 2007, 22:00   #8
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thanks, David and David!
A couple more:
Epinotia immundana has a distinctive white diamond on its back - sometimes!
Bramble-shoot moth (Epiblema udmanniana) has a clear black shape - not unlike a mini-cooper!
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Old Tuesday 3rd July 2007, 22:03   #9
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(Surreybirder) Is Aphomia sociella also known as the Bee Moth? If so how come it's so large and is still a micro? I guess it's the sort of thing I ought to know. My Bee Moth pic attached (I think).
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Old Wednesday 4th July 2007, 06:23   #10
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Hi, David, yes Aphomia sociella is also known as the bee moth because its larvae feeds on honey combs.
Ken

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Old Wednesday 4th July 2007, 12:24   #11
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A few more here that might be of interest.
652 Alabonia geoffrella
Meal Moth
1001 Lozotaeniodes formosanus
1002 4 spot tortrix Lozotaeniodes forsterana
and
462 Ypsolopha sequella also know locally as the playboy bunny moth!
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Old Wednesday 4th July 2007, 13:34   #12
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The genus of the fourth one should be Lozotaenia.

I'll post some when I get chance.
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Old Wednesday 4th July 2007, 14:19   #13
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Juniper Webber Dichomeris marginella

Quick look at a favourite of mine which should be on the wing now. Looks a bit like one of the crambids (pyralidae) but is a gelechid. Distinctive brown and white markings continue onto the furry 'nose'.
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Old Wednesday 4th July 2007, 15:06   #14
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small magpie - Eurrhypara hortulata - very common
magpie - Abraxas grossulariata - (not a micro but main confusion species) - decidely uncommon where I live but common in parts of Scotland at least.
Also, a slightly fresher example of Lozotaenia forsterana
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Old Wednesday 4th July 2007, 15:28   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by david avis View Post
(Surreybirder) Is Aphomia sociella also known as the Bee Moth? If so how come it's so large and is still a micro? I guess it's the sort of thing I ought to know. My Bee Moth pic attached (I think).
Micros are not necessarily all that small and are often considerably bigger than some macros. Large Tabby Aglossa pinguinalis is one of the largest and is a fairly common pyralid.

Other largish pyralids include Mother 0f Pearl Pleuroptya ruralis seen here with a Short-cloaked Moth Nola cucullatella (macro) and Thistle Ermine Myelois circumvoluta here posing with a Round-winged Muslin Thumatha senex (also a macro).
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Old Wednesday 4th July 2007, 21:10   #16
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Five from me

Five Micros from me that are easy to ID (relatively!):-

1. Endotricha flammealis
2. European Corn-borer
3. Rusty Dot Pearl
4. Small China-mark
5. Udea prunalis

If every summer cloud has a silver lining, it must be the chance to review all the Micros that I have photographed over the last two years but have not tried to ID because of the more 'sexy' Macros.

robhope

Egrets, I've had a few
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Old Thursday 5th July 2007, 18:41   #17
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Anyone got a pic of Carcina quercana - that's another sp. that comes up frequently -- and how about Diurnea fagella ?
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Old Thursday 5th July 2007, 18:55   #18
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Carcina quercana

Not the most brilliant shot I'm afraid. Lovely moth.
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Old Thursday 5th July 2007, 19:18   #19
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Diurne fagella and March Moth

Light and dark vesions of Diurnea fagella plus confusion species that I've never caught locally, the macro March Moth.

David
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Old Thursday 5th July 2007, 19:46   #20
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No new moths to look at so here's some old ones - several of the Bryotrophas.

1. Bryotropha affinis
2. Bryotropha similis
3. Bryotropha senectella
4. Bryotropha terrella
5. Bryotropha domestica

David
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Old Friday 6th July 2007, 14:40   #21
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This is an expansion on Robs set of pyralids. I've included another couple of shots of Endotricha flammealis which hopefully show a little more of the distinctive character of this moth. The shape and resting position are rather unique.

Udea olivalis is a very common moth in my garden trap.

Udeal lutealis is much less common in my garden (only two records) but is common enough generally.

Note the common feature in all the pyralids shown: the antennae usually sweep back along the centre of the abdomen, converging before diverging again.
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Old Friday 6th July 2007, 14:54   #22
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Big and sexy Pyralids

Some of the larger and more distinctive pyralid moths:

Garden Pebble Evergestis forficalis - big for a micro with distinctive shape and tent-like rest position

Gold Triangle Hypsopygia costalis - small but unique. Also rests with the wings in a flat triangle.

Mother of Pearl Pleuroptya ruralis - another shot of this large pyrale.

Phlyctaenia coronata - similar shape to the last one but usually smaller.
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Old Friday 6th July 2007, 15:13   #23
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Orthopygia glaucinalis, Water Veneer & Rush Veneer

Three more pyralids.

Orthopygia glaucinalis is relatively large and easy to identify with it's two narrow pale bands.

Water Veneer Acentria ephemerella is tiny but easy to identify and can be numerous on certain nights from July onwards. These will all be males as winged females are rare, most staying in the water where the bulk of the life cycle is played out.

Rush Veneer Nomophila noctuella is a common migrant and quite distinctive with its shape and dark markings.
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Old Friday 6th July 2007, 15:23   #24
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China-marks

We've already seen pictures of Brown and Small China-marks above. Here are the other two.

Beautiful China-mark Nymphula stagnata

Ringed China-mark Parapoynx stratiotata - the female is rather plain brown but still has the distinctive ring mark.

I've included another shot of the Small China-mark Cataclysta lemnata to emphasise the beautiful string of black, white and blue markings on the hindwing margin. Often disturbed around ponds in the daytime.
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Old Friday 6th July 2007, 16:05   #25
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Phycitinae

This is a sub-family of the pyralids. Still clearly from that family - check the antennae - but most are elongated with the wings held rather tightly around the abdomen and rolled slightly. Many are tricky to identify but these four are quite easy.

Euzophera pinguis - get quite a lot of these - the pattern and raised head stance are quite distinctive.

Homoeosoma sinuella - not quite so common - pale ground colour and blotchy brown bands characterise the species.

Pempelia formosa - rather local but I seem to get this one a bit in July - the extensive uniform reddish basal section followed by bands of black, white and reddish make this one very attractive.

Thistle Ermine Myelois circumvoluta - just about the easiest phycitinid and very common. Much bigger than the superficially similar Yponomeuta Ermines.
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