Join for FREE
It only takes a minute!
Magnifying the passion for nature. Zeiss Victory Harpia 95. New!

Welcome to BirdForum.
BirdForum is the net's largest birding community, dedicated to wild birds and birding, and is absolutely FREE! You are most welcome to register for an account, which allows you to take part in lively discussions in the forum, post your pictures in the gallery and more.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rating: Thread Rating: 41 votes, 4.98 average.
Old Monday 18th June 2012, 07:18   #101
Hermann
Registered User

 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Germany
Posts: 1,701
Quote:
Originally Posted by LPT View Post
I don't have any Trinovids although I have several circa 1950's Leitz Porros (Binuxit 8X30, Decimarit 10X60, Mardocit 12X60) and these are superb binoculars. It's my impression that optically the Uppendahl prism Trinovids were not equal to the Porros they replaced although ergonomically they were far superior which was their great attraction. Opinions??
ANY roof prim binocular without phase-coating won't come close to a well-made porro, with resolution and contrast being the main issues. Phase-coating was only invented in the late 1980's.

Hermann
Hermann is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Thursday 20th September 2012, 22:21   #102
looksharp65
Registered User
 
looksharp65's Avatar

 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Varberg, Sweden
Posts: 1,770
Talking Meopta 6x30 Antireflex CF

Today I received an old Meopta 6x30, single-layer coated and with center focus. They are in very good used condition. By the look of the logo I can tell it was made somewhere between 1947 to 1956.

This is not going to be a full-scale review. I'll mention about my initial impressions and make some superficial comparisons to a couple of other binoculars.
Complementary posts may be added.

The short story: This is a gem! I have preferences that never will be met by vintage binoculars, but in every respect they did meet or surpass my (admittedly low) expectations.

Let's start with its shortcomings:

1) Since I have the Vortex Fury 6.5x32 and usually wear spectacles, the Meopta was bought for the intended use with contact lenses. I was after a binocular with short eye relief. My wish was granted, by a very small margin against too low eye relief.
Another millimeter higher the rigid eyecup, and I would not be able to see the field stop. For me it's OK, for someone else they may have too little eye relief.

2) It does suffer from considerable ghosting in less favourable circumstances.
When the Sun is low, reflections become bothersome. Then again, not so at noon or (obviously) when looking away from the Sun.

3) Possibly as a result from restauration, the diopter moves too easily.

4) The close focus is around 3.5 meters


Then, here come the good things:

1) When I carried the parcel home, I harboured a gnawing suspicion that there's an empty leather case within. Luckily, I was wrong!
The binoculars are very lightweight, but not to the extent that they lack that reassuring solidity one has come to expect from vintage bins.

2) They are surprisingly small and svelte - much smaller than I remember that the Jenoptem 8x30s were. The ocular lenses are about 10-11 mm in diameter, but even the outer diameter of the oculars is liberatingly thin.

3) Apart from the freely turning diopter the mechanics are superb.
The central hinge is very stiff and the focus wheel - which of course goes clockwise towards infinity! - is easy to turn. It is surprisingly fast for such an old binocular. I haven't measured it, but it seems negligibly slower than the Fury's wheel. Everything seems very solid - imagine a Jenoptem with unnecessary bulk and weight removed. The central bridge can be rocked by about a millimeter but moves back promptly.
These look and feel more field-worthy than the sleek and delicate pre-war porros.

4) These are sharp! When boosting them 2.5x, on-axis CA is nonexistent.
The Furys show considerably more. The edge sharpness suffers from some curvature of field, but about 70% of the FOV can achieve full focus.
Unfortunately there is no clear sky now to provide any pin-point star test conditions. I'll get back about that.

5) The field of view is only a smidgeon narrower than the Fury's. I'd guess it's around 8.3 degrees or 145 m/1000 m or 435 ft/1000 yds but this may be proved wrong.
Their AFOV though, is visibly smaller than the Fury's due to their lesser magnification - probably around 50 degrees. In that sense, these can't be called wide angle binoculars. Anyhow, the low magnification grants a wide TFOV.

6) Their colour renditon is only slightly warm. I would say that the Zeiss (West) 10x40 BGAT* is marginally more yellow than the Meopta.
This is a real relief after having tried the Swift Newport MkII (very blue), the IOR Valdada 7x40 (heavy green tint) and the Jenoptem (considerably brown/yellow).

7) Despite the fact that they are single-coated, colour saturation and brightness is a lot better than I had dared to hope for.
Admittedly, the (FMC) Fury is brighter. But even though the difference is clearly visible, the Meopta isn't annoyingly dark.
On the contrary, it once again performs strikingly similar to many modern binoculars.

8) If it matters, the looks of the Meopta porro may be the most "classy" of all binoculars I have ever seen.
It is not only their looks, but also how the engineering has been exercised.
If these were to be used beneath a camera, the only possible one would be the Leica M3 or M4.
That is how I perceive these - solid but svelte, precision engineered and simply classy in a most modest way.
That said, they are undeniably dated. But still, they have aged with grace.

To be continued...
__________________
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Visby_lenses - The Viking optics
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LuBYpRkbzrs - The Viking War Cry

Last edited by looksharp65 : Friday 21st September 2012 at 21:54.
looksharp65 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Tuesday 25th September 2012, 21:04   #103
Simon S
Registered User
 
Simon S's Avatar

 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Crawley Down West Sussex
Posts: 526
Quote:
Originally Posted by looksharp65 View Post
Today I received an old Meopta 6x30, single-layer coated and with center focus. They are in very good used condition. By the look of the logo I can tell it was made somewhere between 1947 to 1956.

This is not going to be a full-scale review. I'll mention about my initial impressions and make some superficial comparisons to a couple of other binoculars.
Complementary posts may be added.

The short story: This is a gem! I have preferences that never will be met by vintage binoculars, but in every respect they did meet or surpass my (admittedly low) expectations.

Let's start with its shortcomings:

1) Since I have the Vortex Fury 6.5x32 and usually wear spectacles, the Meopta was bought for the intended use with contact lenses. I was after a binocular with short eye relief. My wish was granted, by a very small margin against too low eye relief.
Another millimeter higher the rigid eyecup, and I would not be able to see the field stop. For me it's OK, for someone else they may have too little eye relief.

2) It does suffer from considerable ghosting in less favourable circumstances.
When the Sun is low, reflections become bothersome. Then again, not so at noon or (obviously) when looking away from the Sun.

3) Possibly as a result from restauration, the diopter moves too easily.

4) The close focus is around 3.5 meters


Then, here come the good things:

1) When I carried the parcel home, I harboured a gnawing suspicion that there's an empty leather case within. Luckily, I was wrong!
The binoculars are very lightweight, but not to the extent that they lack that reassuring solidity one has come to expect from vintage bins.

2) They are surprisingly small and svelte - much smaller than I remember that the Jenoptem 8x30s were. The ocular lenses are about 10-11 mm in diameter, but even the outer diameter of the oculars is liberatingly thin.

3) Apart from the freely turning diopter the mechanics are superb.
The central hinge is very stiff and the focus wheel - which of course goes clockwise towards infinity! - is easy to turn. It is surprisingly fast for such an old binocular. I haven't measured it, but it seems negligibly slower than the Fury's wheel. Everything seems very solid - imagine a Jenoptem with unnecessary bulk and weight removed. The central bridge can be rocked by about a millimeter but moves back promptly.
These look and feel more field-worthy than the sleek and delicate pre-war porros.

4) These are sharp! When boosting them 2.5x, on-axis CA is nonexistent.
The Furys show considerably more. The edge sharpness suffers from some curvature of field, but about 70% of the FOV can achieve full focus.
Unfortunately there is no clear sky now to provide any pin-point star test conditions. I'll get back about that.

5) The field of view is only a smidgeon narrower than the Fury's. I'd guess it's around 8.3 degrees or 145 m/1000 m or 435 ft/1000 yds but this may be proved wrong.
Their AFOV though, is visibly smaller than the Fury's due to their lesser magnification - probably around 50 degrees. In that sense, these can't be called wide angle binoculars. Anyhow, the low magnification grants a wide TFOV.

6) Their colour renditon is only slightly warm. I would say that the Zeiss (West) 10x40 BGAT* is marginally more yellow than the Meopta.
This is a real relief after having tried the Swift Newport MkII (very blue), the IOR Valdada 7x40 (heavy green tint) and the Jenoptem (considerably brown/yellow).

7) Despite the fact that they are single-coated, colour saturation and brightness is a lot better than I had dared to hope for.
Admittedly, the (FMC) Fury is brighter. But even though the difference is clearly visible, the Meopta isn't annoyingly dark.
On the contrary, it once again performs strikingly similar to many modern binoculars.

8) If it matters, the looks of the Meopta porro may be the most "classy" of all binoculars I have ever seen.
It is not only their looks, but also how the engineering has been exercised.
If these were to be used beneath a camera, the only possible one would be the Leica M3 or M4.
That is how I perceive these - solid but svelte, precision engineered and simply classy in a most modest way.
That said, they are undeniably dated. But still, they have aged with grace.

To be continued...
I have a few pairs of these, the latest have good optics.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	meopta 8x30.jpg
Views:	564
Size:	88.8 KB
ID:	406472  
__________________
MY Binocular collection http://www.flickr.com/photos/binoculars/

Last edited by Simon S : Tuesday 25th September 2012 at 21:12.
Simon S is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Tuesday 25th September 2012, 22:51   #104
looksharp65
Registered User
 
looksharp65's Avatar

 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Varberg, Sweden
Posts: 1,770
Meopta 6x30

Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	DSC01925 - Kopia.JPG
Views:	412
Size:	262.9 KB
ID:	406495  Click image for larger version

Name:	DSC01927 - Kopia.JPG
Views:	211
Size:	275.0 KB
ID:	406496  
__________________
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Visby_lenses - The Viking optics
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LuBYpRkbzrs - The Viking War Cry
looksharp65 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Wednesday 26th September 2012, 17:42   #105
looksharp65
Registered User
 
looksharp65's Avatar

 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Varberg, Sweden
Posts: 1,770
Quote:
Originally Posted by Simon S View Post
I have a few pairs of these, the latest have good optics.
Simon, is that your Meopta 8x30 with Kershaw eyepieces and bridge?

//L
__________________
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Visby_lenses - The Viking optics
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LuBYpRkbzrs - The Viking War Cry
looksharp65 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Sunday 28th October 2012, 22:21   #106
Simon S
Registered User
 
Simon S's Avatar

 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Crawley Down West Sussex
Posts: 526
Sorry for delay in responding. No it was just the eyelenses nothing else.
Love your Meopta, what is the view like?
__________________
MY Binocular collection http://www.flickr.com/photos/binoculars/
Simon S is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Monday 29th October 2012, 07:20   #107
looksharp65
Registered User
 
looksharp65's Avatar

 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Varberg, Sweden
Posts: 1,770
Quote:
Originally Posted by Simon S View Post
Sorry for delay in responding. No it was just the eyelenses nothing else.
Love your Meopta, what is the view like?
Simon, I wrote about that a few posts up!
It is about as good as one could expect - the lack of modern multicoatings does make a difference. Apart from some ghosting and straylight, everything is fine.

//L
__________________
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Visby_lenses - The Viking optics
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LuBYpRkbzrs - The Viking War Cry
looksharp65 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Friday 9th November 2012, 17:52   #108
Steve C
Registered User
 
Steve C's Avatar

 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Klamath Falls, Oregon
Posts: 3,408
I've decided I'm not really born to collect stuff just to have a collection of stuff. I'm still going to do that to a degree with my Swifts, but I have decided to sell some of the "way to blasted many" binoculars I have . I have put some in the classifieds, but will reference it here as well. So anybody interested can start there or PM me for a more complete list.

Another motivator I must confess, is the now becoming dire need to get my laptop replaced before it dies at a critical time.

I have a couple of nice Zeiss Jenoptems, 8x30, one of which (a fully multi- coated one), could pass for new. There are several really good Tasco 7x35's and some others too.
__________________
Steve

"Do what you can, where you are, with what you have" Teddy Roosevelt.
Steve C is offline  
Reply With Quote

BF Supporter 2009 Support BirdForum With A Donation

Old Friday 1st February 2013, 15:53   #109
coolhand68
Registered User

 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Boston, MA
Posts: 87
Over the last two years I've collected a few pair of classics. I just can't seem to pass up a good deal.

Tasco 7x35 extra wide angle light weight - surprisingly crisp, sharp and clear. Eye relief is not very generous though.

Hensoldt Wetzlar 6x30 - sharp, clear, and nice contrast. Very impressive little set of binoculars for this vintage (early 60's?).

Zeiss Jena 8x30 (Jenoptem) - Serial numer is in the 600XXXX range. Scored a mint set off an auction site. Nice, but there's something about Zeiss glass that doesn't seem to do it for me. They are bright and contrasty, but sometimes the colors seem to get washed out from too much brightness. I notice that with the newer 8x30 FL's as well. There's also a mysterious halo around the edges at certain angles during viewing.

Leitz Binuxit 8x30 - Mine date to about the mid to late 50's I believe, possibly early 60's. They have a nice clear, sharp image, slightly warm. Only minor gripe is that these older porros don't have very good close focus ability so they aren't ideal for backyard feeder watching. Great for other occasions like sporting events.

Hartmann Optik Wetzlar Porlerim 8x30 - Probably early 50's. Has these serviced by Nicolas Crista--he does great work. These are some sleepers; optically they are right on par with Zeiss and Leitz and very well made. Not sure why they don't get more recognition, but if you can score a pair of these in good shape don't pass them up!

Bausch and Lomb Zephyr 7x35 - Mine date back to around 1947, and I always impressed at the image of these vintage binoculars. Amazing clarity, sharpness and contrast for glass that's nearly 70 years old. They are also very light weight. Only minor gripe is that they have a narrow POV.

Yashica 10x50 - Nice, average in performance, I wouldn't go out of my way to score one though. I am curious how the Yashica 8x30's perform.

Pentax Jupiter 8x30 - I got these cheap and had them cleaned and serviced by Suddarth. Came back like a new set of binoculars. Not sure what the vintage is on these, maybe 1960's? Not very bright and focus distance is again not great, but if you can find these at a good price they are worth a look.

Nikon 7x50 Featherweight - Also had these serviced by Suddarth, who wrote back how impressive this vintage Nikon glass was. These are incredibly sharp and clear with great color rendition and contrast. One thing about these, don't let the featherweight fool you, these are some big honking binoculars. Sweet to look through though, especially in the twilight hour.

Nikon 9x35A - I often see these listed on ebay for around $125 in mint condition--at that price these are a bargain! They are a notch below the "E" series Nikon's but not very far below. You can do worse at that price with some of the newer glass out there. Of course you give up close focus and water proofing, but what a sweet view you get through these. Stick with the later ones if you can.

Nikon 7x35 Nippon Kogaku - Also had these serviced by Nicolas Crista, almost as nice as the 9x35 except these are slightly softer around the edges. The newer Action series will give you a better view overall, so unless you are a collector, you aren't missing anything.

I also have an older set of Sears 7x35 lying about. Not a bad glass. Made in Japan, only paid $5 for them at a flea market so I couldn't pass them up at that price.
coolhand68 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Friday 1st February 2013, 16:32   #110
Pinewood
New York correspondent
 
Pinewood's Avatar

 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: New York, USA
Posts: 3,386
Quote:
Originally Posted by coolhand68 View Post

Leitz Binuxit 8x30 - Mine date to about the mid to late 50's I believe, possibly early 60's. They have a nice clear, sharp image, slightly warm. Only minor gripe is that these older porros don't have very good close focus ability so they aren't ideal for backyard feeder watching. Great for other occasions like sporting events.

.
Hello Coolhand68,

Some of the Geman binoculars from the 1950's had cement, Canadian balsam, which yellowed with age. I have a Binuxit with a definite warm tinge, but a slightly newer one does not exhibit this warm tone. The Binuxit has rather poor eye relief.

Happy bird watching,
Arthur Pinewood
Pinewood is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Friday 1st February 2013, 16:37   #111
Renze de Vries
Registered User
 
Renze de Vries's Avatar

 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Groningen, Netherlands
Posts: 476
Quote:
Originally Posted by coolhand68 View Post
Leitz Binuxit 8x30 - Mine date to about the mid to late 50's I believe, possibly early 60's. They have a nice clear, sharp image, slightly warm. Only minor gripe is that these older porros don't have very good close focus ability so they aren't ideal for backyard feeder watching. Great for other occasions like sporting events.
My Binuxit focuses close at ca. 4 mtrs or yards. Not too bad I'd say for a 1950's/60's binocular.

Renze
Renze de Vries is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Saturday 2nd February 2013, 02:06   #112
Steve C
Registered User
 
Steve C's Avatar

 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Klamath Falls, Oregon
Posts: 3,408
I think you will find nearly all of the vintage porros, to have very limited (as in next to none) eye relief. Porros as a class do not excel at close focus. They likely never will, largely due to optical constraints imposed by widely spaced objectives.

So if lots of eye relief is necessary for you with a binocular, vintage porros likely will never be your cup of tea.

Other than that, there is a lot to recommend these oldies.
__________________
Steve

"Do what you can, where you are, with what you have" Teddy Roosevelt.
Steve C is offline  
Reply With Quote

BF Supporter 2009 Support BirdForum With A Donation

Old Tuesday 5th February 2013, 22:11   #113
Ysterkvisten
Registered User

 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Stockholm and Öland
Posts: 63
Kowa 10x50

Got the advice from FrankD to post my question here so here we go:

I just bought an old pair of porro Kowa 10x50 Field 7,2. Says Fully Coated Triple tested. No. 821484.
Does anyone know anything about them?
They are just amazing by the way.
Thanks guys

Janne
Ysterkvisten is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Tuesday 5th February 2013, 22:57   #114
FrankD
Registered User
 
FrankD's Avatar

 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Eastern Pennsylvania
Posts: 8,365
In case he doesn't get to the thread anytime soon here is his Flickr page for binoculars.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/binoculars/
__________________
Visit our Optics Review site......
http://opticstheviewfromhere.com/
Digiscoped videos .....
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCAf...1LMvsLF0DExoog
FrankD is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Wednesday 6th February 2013, 21:02   #115
Ysterkvisten
Registered User

 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Stockholm and Öland
Posts: 63
FrankD
I've seen his collection and have been looking for any Kowa, but no luck.
Hopefully, an image will be attached here of my find.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	DSCN0011.JPG
Views:	378
Size:	293.2 KB
ID:	427014  
Ysterkvisten is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Tuesday 19th February 2013, 19:45   #116
Simon S
Registered User
 
Simon S's Avatar

 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Crawley Down West Sussex
Posts: 526
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ysterkvisten View Post
FrankD
I've seen his collection and have been looking for any Kowa, but no luck.
Hopefully, an image will be attached here of my find.
That looks very much like a Bushnell Banner as well, a nice optical performance.
A good find indeed, are the optics good?
__________________
MY Binocular collection http://www.flickr.com/photos/binoculars/
Simon S is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Tuesday 19th February 2013, 21:29   #117
mooreorless
Registered User
 
mooreorless's Avatar

 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Huntingdon,Pa.
Posts: 3,419
J after our messages I found a Kowa 10x50 Prominar poro on Ebay that had been sold. Information says 7.0 Degree and yours has 7.2 ° listed. There is a picture but the listing is from Jan. 22,2013 and too old. It sold for $250 US. I don't think this is the same as yours. The seller has sold some nice binoculars.
mooreorless is online now  
Reply With Quote
Old Tuesday 19th February 2013, 22:54   #118
Ysterkvisten
Registered User

 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Stockholm and Öland
Posts: 63
Close but no cigar Steve :-)
Thanks for trying to figure this out.

This is strange. Kowa must have sold more than 1 pair of binos back then (whenever that was). What happened to all Bino collectors?
The 3D effect in them is amazing. At 30 ft and bushes around the bird, it just pops out!
Skål (Cheers) Janne
Ysterkvisten is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Thursday 20th June 2013, 20:02   #119
Bencw
Registered User

 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: London
Posts: 1,002
Hi all,
If of any interest, I picked up this binuxit cheap recently, with a view to restore. It is mainly just very filthy, but in alignment, and not "yellow" when viewing, just a dirty film.
First problem is replacing the damaged eye cups, ( any idea's welcome?) I really hope I dont have to mess with the prisms, I heard they are a devil to get back in these.
The other 2 pics are before and after of a Jenoptem that I recently restored, was way out of alignment, had a cracked prism, (replaced like for like) and some paint needed, took ages to re-align, but quite pleased with the result.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	binuxitbinsbefore.JPG
Views:	116
Size:	30.9 KB
ID:	448965  Click image for larger version

Name:	damagedzeiss.JPG
Views:	102
Size:	51.9 KB
ID:	448966  Click image for larger version

Name:	ZEISJENOPTEM.AFTER2.JPG
Views:	122
Size:	49.9 KB
ID:	448967  
Bencw is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Monday 24th June 2013, 15:52   #120
Renze de Vries
Registered User
 
Renze de Vries's Avatar

 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Groningen, Netherlands
Posts: 476
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bencw View Post
First problem is replacing the damaged eye cups, ( any idea's welcome?)
I use a pair of Swift eyecups as applied on post-1985 Audubon 804 (HR/5) and other models of Hiyoshi's design. They simply slide over the Leitz' cups, fit snugly and can be adjusted in height. If you're satisfied a few drops of glue will keep them in place 'till the end of time. see pics.

Renze
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	L1010486 (800x596).jpg
Views:	176
Size:	282.7 KB
ID:	449522  Click image for larger version

Name:	L1010487 (800x600).jpg
Views:	186
Size:	210.4 KB
ID:	449523  
Renze de Vries is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Thursday 27th June 2013, 11:37   #121
Bencw
Registered User

 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: London
Posts: 1,002
Quote:
Originally Posted by Renze de Vries View Post
I use a pair of Swift eyecups as applied on post-1985 Audubon 804 (HR/5) and other models of Hiyoshi's design. They simply slide over the Leitz' cups, fit snugly and can be adjusted in height. If you're satisfied a few drops of glue will keep them in place 'till the end of time. see pics.

Renze
Hi Renze,

Many thanks for your suggestion, I will still search for a replacement cup, as one is broken badly, but I will also try that, as they look in your photo as though they are far more comfortable to use. In fact that has given me a few ideas, for other vintage binoculars I have, in particular a hartmann 7x35 polerim which I use quite a lot, it is a comfortable wide angle binocular, but your idea may improve it further. Hartmann are somewhat underrated, in my opinion, they made great optics comparable to zeiss at the time.
Bencw is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Thursday 27th June 2013, 13:03   #122
Hermann
Registered User

 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Germany
Posts: 1,701
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bencw View Post
Hartmann are somewhat underrated, in my opinion, they made great optics comparable to zeiss at the time.
I'd go further than that - the Hartmann binoculars were better than *any* of the Zeiss roofs at the time, especially those of the Bernina series. Better coatings, better resolution, better everything. The Zeiss roofs only began catching up after the introduction of T* coatings and P-coatings.

Hermann
Hermann is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Thursday 27th June 2013, 16:01   #123
Bencw
Registered User

 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: London
Posts: 1,002
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hermann View Post
I'd go further than that - the Hartmann binoculars were better than *any* of the Zeiss roofs at the time, especially those of the Bernina series. Better coatings, better resolution, better everything. The Zeiss roofs only began catching up after the introduction of T* coatings and P-coatings.

Hermann
Hermann,
Would have to agree, my 7x35 Polerim is great to use. I also have a 6x30 Polerim, and have read about the Bernina series and the Compact series, I keep a look out for both but they very rarely become available. I missed a Compact series on ebay last year, and its the only one from that series I have seen for sale, and I have never yet seen a Bernina series Binocular offered for sale.
Bencw is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Thursday 27th June 2013, 17:57   #124
Pinewood
New York correspondent
 
Pinewood's Avatar

 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: New York, USA
Posts: 3,386
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bencw View Post
Hi all,

First problem is replacing the damaged eye cups, ( any idea's welcome?) I really hope I dont have to mess with the prisms, I heard they are a devil to get back in these.
Hello Bencw,

From time to time, on that electronic auction site, I see ads for replacement cups for Leitz 7x50 military binoculars, from someone in England. Those cups fit the Binuxit and Mardocit binoculars, as well. I recall that he wanted about $22 for a pair. See:

his ebay ad

Happy collecting,
Arthur Pinewood
__________________
Bread is not enough. Give us circuses!
Pinewood is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Thursday 27th June 2013, 18:27   #125
Jane Turner
Registered User
 
Jane Turner's Avatar

 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Hoylake, Merseyside
Posts: 22,808
Quote:
Originally Posted by coal tit View Post
in early june jane turner had mentioned in the bird forum a pair of WW11 KRIESGMARINE
7x50 binoculars that were up for sale in her local auction carl zeiss jena early coated optics circa 1939 for coastal artillery would have liked to have seen how they performed
in the field for one or two days.
They were good, but not a patch on the two pairs Hensoldt 10x40 Dialyts I picked up :). If my Leicas ever die, they are good enough for me to use.
__________________

Last Cheshire Surf Scoter (310) last Red Rocks Subalpine Warbler (260), last Garden Great White Egret (208), last Self-found Citrine Wagtail (294)
Jane Turner is offline  
Reply With Quote

BF Supporter 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 Support BirdForum With A Donation

Advertisement
Reply


Thread Tools
Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Vintage Binoculars LPT Others 335 Tuesday 14th February 2017 23:36
vintage binoculars chunder Binoculars 6 Thursday 23rd September 2010 18:52
vintage vs new binoculars wordpainter Binoculars 5 Tuesday 6th April 2010 19:41
vintage vs new binoculars wordpainter Binoculars 5 Sunday 4th April 2010 15:02
Vintage binoculars potts34137a Binoculars 34 Monday 15th June 2009 07:34

{googleads}
£100 Cashback on Opticron DBA VHD Binoculars. Click to find out more.

Fatbirder's Top 1000 Birding Websites

Help support BirdForum

Page generated in 0.24522495 seconds with 36 queries
All times are GMT. The time now is 14:59.