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Old Friday 12th June 2009, 07:24   #1
Markus Lagerqvist
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Phylogeny of Paroaria

Hi,

I new article is out in Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution: "Accounting for molecular stochasticity in systematic revisions: species limits and phylogeny of Paroaria"

Does anyone have access to the article?
Would love to read the results!

Cheers!
Markus
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Old Friday 12th June 2009, 08:28   #2
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Abstract

Here's the abstract:
Different frameworks have been proposed for using molecular data in systematic revisions, but there is ongoing debate on their applicability, merits and shortcomings. In this paper we examine the fit between morphological and molecular data in the systematic revision of Paroaria, a group of conspicuous songbirds endemic to South America. We delimited species based on examination of > 600 specimens, and developed distance-gap, and distance- and character-based coalescent simulations to test species limits with molecular data. The morphological and molecular data collected were then analyzed using parsimony, maximum likelihood, and Bayesian phylogenetics. The simulations were better at evaluating the new species limits than using genetic distances. Species diversity within Paroaria had been underestimated by 60%, and the revised genus comprises eight species. Phylogenetic analyses consistently recovered a congruent topology for the most recently derived species in the genus, but the most basal divergences were not resolved with these data. The systematic and phylogenetic hypotheses developed here are relevant to both setting conservation priorities and understanding the biogeography of South America.

Liliana M. Dávalos, Ana Luz Porzecanski 2009.
I'd also be interested to know the results (in particular the proposed eight species)...

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Old Friday 12th June 2009, 10:44   #3
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From the text,the species are: P. coronata, P.dominicana, P. capitata (including P.c. fuscipes), the three former subspecies of P. gularis sensu latu (P. gularis, P. nigrogenis, and P. cervicalis) and the two former subspecies of P. baeri sensu latu (P. baeri, P. xinguensis).

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Old Friday 12th June 2009, 11:32   #4
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Thanks cajanuma.

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Old Sunday 14th June 2009, 15:43   #5
Markus Lagerqvist
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Boyd's Taxonomy in Flux handles the same data this way:

"The species limits of Paroaria have been changed based on Dávalos et al. (2009). I've separated Masked Cardinal, Paroaria nigrogenis, from Red-capped Cardinal and merged Yellow-billed Cardinal into Red-capped Cardinal. Thus Red-capped Cardinal includes the subspecies gularis, cervicalis, capitata, and fuscipes."
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Old Monday 15th June 2009, 21:37   #6
Rasmus Boegh
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Interesting, though I'm not convinced all these splits would go through if using BSC (but some certainly will, notably P. nigrogenis). Regardless of the species concept, I find some of the morphological information they present problematic, especially for bill and legs. Why they generally choose to rely on old specimens (where bare part colours often are highly unreliable) and old publications (where often equally unreliable) is odd, considering that the true bare part colours for most taxa (the only exception being xinguensis) now are well-known by ornithologists working in the specific regions, and the issues could therefore have been avoided by checking with local ornithological authorities. For example, according to their appendix A, the bill colours are (my comments in brackets after each species - all comments are for adults; bill colours are different in juv's, as described in two of the species in post #9 here: http://www.birdforum.net/showthread.php?t=140312):

* P. coronata; pearly gray. (upper mandible very light greyish, almost white, with dark grey culmen; lower mandible very light greyish, almost white)
* P. dominicana; pearly gray (upper mandible blackish; lower mandible very light greyish, almost white).
* P. capitata; yellow. (orange).
* P. cervicalis; black + yellow. (upper mandible blackish; lower mandible pale pinkish-flesh, sometimes faintly tinged orange, with a narrow blackish tip).
* P. gularis; black + yellow. (upper mandible blackish; lower mandible pale pinkish-flesh, sometimes faintly tinged orange, with a narrow blackish tip).
* P. nigrogenis; black + yellow. (upper mandible blackish; lower mandible very light greyish, almost white, with a narrow blackish tip. Very light greyish occasionally replaced by very light flesh-coloured).
* P. baeri; black. (upper mandible blackish; lower mandible very light greyish, almost white, with a narrow blackish tip).
* P. xinguensis; black. (never seen it, don't know; reputedly like baeri).

Some of the differences noted above are of course minor, and others are described/shown more accurately in their appendix B/fig. 3, but several of them are not. Comparably, according to them, some species have grey tarsi, while others have black (here disregarding the strikingly different P. capitata). In reality, they're dark greyish, to the extend that it easily could be described as black, but there are no obvious differences between the species.

On an entirely separate issue I found it interesting that P. coronata and P. capitata are listed on CITES app. II. I am well aware that this appendix includes species not threatened at present, but I'm surprised anyone seriously would think these two are even remotely at risk of becomming threatened in the future.

Last edited by Rasmus Boegh : Monday 15th June 2009 at 22:49.
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Old Friday 1st October 2010, 20:56   #7
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Species limits in Paroaria, Proposal (469) to SACC
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Old Thursday 31st March 2011, 20:55   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter Kovalik View Post
Species limits in Paroaria, Proposal (469) to SACC
Proposal 469A to elevate nigrogenis to species rank passed 31 Mar 2011.
www.museum.lsu.edu/~Remsen/SACCproproster.html

Proposal 469B to elevate cervicalis and xinguensis to species rank failed to pass 5 Mar 2011.
http://www.museum.lsu.edu/~Remsen/SA...ntChanges.html
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Old Friday 1st April 2011, 15:49   #9
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Thanks Richard. Has IOC looked at nigrogenis? I did not see it in their v2.8.

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Old Friday 1st April 2011, 15:58   #10
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Masked Cardinal

Quote:
Originally Posted by njlarsen View Post
Has IOC looked at nigrogenis? I did not see it in their v2.8.
Hasn't been listed yet (as far as I'm aware). But I strongly suspect that, as soon as the team has recovered from the transition to v2.8, it's likely to make an appearance.

Last edited by Richard Klim : Friday 1st April 2011 at 16:01.
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Old Sunday 3rd April 2011, 19:51   #11
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Masked Cardinal

Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Klim View Post
I strongly suspect that, as soon as the team has recovered from the transition to v2.8, it's likely to make an appearance.
v2.9 (Draft): Accepted Split #1.
www.worldbirdnames.org/updates-spp.html

Last edited by Richard Klim : Sunday 3rd April 2011 at 19:58.
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Old Thursday 2nd February 2012, 10:48   #12
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Paroaria

http://www.teses.usp.br/teses/dispon...-174033/fr.php

link to pdf at the bottom
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