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Old Wednesday 16th December 2009, 21:37   #1
Daniel Philippe
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Owls

http://www.uni-heidelberg.de/institu.../2009/Owls.pdf
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Old Thursday 17th December 2009, 09:51   #2
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Barn Owl

These statements (p582) are a little curious:
"The Eurasian Barn Owl Tyto alba has been divided into several subspecies, of which a number have already been converted into true and distinct species. Whereas the subspecies T. alba and T. guttata can hardly be distinguished genetically, T. erlangeri (from the eastern Mediterranean) and T. affinis (from Africa) form distinct but not highly diverged lineages within the T. alba complex."
The second sentence refers to subspecies, but the taxa are then named as species (T. affinis etc, rather than T. a. affinis). Taken in the context of the first sentence, which refers to conversion to 'true and distinct species', is it possible that Wink et al indeed regard some/all of these taxa as species (despite limited divergence)?

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Old Thursday 17th December 2009, 16:27   #3
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or they consider subspecies as not really that different from species, a viewpoint which from my reading seems to be more prevalent than one would think...
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Old Wednesday 21st January 2015, 13:56   #4
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Wink 2014. Molekulare Phylogenie der Eulen (Strigiformes). Molecular Phylogeny of Owls (Strigiformes). DO-G 147th Annual Meeting, Oct 2014, Bielefeld. Vogelwarte 52(4): 325–326.

(Abstract & phylogeny.)
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Old Wednesday 21st January 2015, 15:03   #5
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One thing that is interesting to me is the deep structure within the Barn Owl complex.

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Old Monday 2nd November 2015, 12:54   #6
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Indian subcontinent

Rawankar A.S., Wagh G.A. & Wadatkar J.S., 2015. DNA barcoding and phylogenetic analysis of Tyto alba, Otus bakkamoena and Athene brama from Indian subcontinent. Int. J. Zool. Res. 5 (5): 7-14.

PDF there
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Old Wednesday 11th November 2015, 00:57   #7
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Cyprus scops owl

Cyprus scops owl might be a distinct species

Zootaxa 4040 (3): 301–316 (11 Nov. 2015)
Reprising the taxonomy of Cyprus Scops Owl Otus (scops) cyprius, a neglected island endemic
PETER FLINT, DAVID WHALEY, GUY M. KIRWAN, MELIS CHARALAMBIDES, MANUEL SCHWEIZER & MICHAEL WINK


Abstract
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Old Wednesday 11th November 2015, 08:16   #8
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Cyprus Scops Owl

Quote:
Originally Posted by Melanie View Post
Zootaxa 4040 (3): 301–316 (11 Nov. 2015)
Reprising the taxonomy of Cyprus Scops Owl Otus (scops) cyprius, a neglected island endemic
PETER FLINT, DAVID WHALEY, GUY M. KIRWAN, MELIS CHARALAMBIDES, MANUEL SCHWEIZER & MICHAEL WINK
Treated as a distinct species by Robb et al 2015 (Undiscovered owls) (and van den Berg 2015 (Dutch Birding bird names))...
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Cyprus Scops Owl challenges many of our ideas about what constitutes a species. Two important vocalisations differ from Eurasian Scops Owl, and yet its mtDNA hardly differs at all. Its plumage is subtly distinct but its structure is not. Large numbers of Eurasian Scops migrate through Cyprus, and yet it remains distinct. Clearly, this taxon represents something more interesting than the various subspecies of Eurasian Scops. It certainly deserves much closer attention than it has received up to now.

Last edited by Richard Klim : Wednesday 11th November 2015 at 08:22. Reason: quote.
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Old Wednesday 11th November 2015, 09:54   #9
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Cyprus Scops Owl

Quote:
Originally Posted by Melanie View Post
Zootaxa 4040 (3): 301–316 (11 Nov. 2015)
Reprising the taxonomy of Cyprus Scops Owl Otus (scops) cyprius, a neglected island endemic
PETER FLINT, DAVID WHALEY, GUY M. KIRWAN, MELIS CHARALAMBIDES, MANUEL SCHWEIZER & MICHAEL WINK
Flint et al 2015. [pdf]
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Old Wednesday 11th November 2015, 20:37   #10
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I wish they will include Galapagos samples in the further studies. At least the SOE gives impression of being something different than those I have seen elsewhere.

Niels
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Old Wednesday 11th November 2015, 20:40   #11
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Chile

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Originally Posted by njlarsen View Post
I wish they will include Galapagos samples in the further studies. At least the SOE gives impression of being something different than those I have seen elsewhere.
Oops, sorry Niels! Just moved Colihueque et al 2015 to Strigiformes: barcoding.

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Old Saturday 9th January 2016, 15:08   #12
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Strigiformes

Wink, M.: Evolution und Systematik der Eulen (Strigiformes). Eulen-Rundblick (in press).
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Old Saturday 26th March 2016, 22:13   #13
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Quote:
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Wink, M.: Evolution und Systematik der Eulen (Strigiformes). Eulen-Rundblick (in press).
PDF is available to download here
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Old Saturday 26th March 2016, 23:29   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter Kovalik View Post
PDF is available to download here
Unfortunately Prof. Wink does not explain the last 65 million years of evolution of the Strigiformes. So I do not understand the title of this paper. The only thing this paper shows are the limitations of a DNA based phylogeny.

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Old Sunday 27th March 2016, 11:26   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter Kovalik View Post
PDF is available to download here
Wink mistakes Otus cyprius as Athene cyprius (page 14).
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Old Sunday 27th March 2016, 12:19   #16
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Originally Posted by Bartgeier View Post
Wink mistakes Otus cyprius as Athene cyprius (page 14).
Perhaps there is a different interpretation?

"Die Steinkäuze auf Zypern konnten kürzlich auch als eigenständiges Taxon A. cyprius beschrieben werden,da es sich genetisch und durch seine Lautäußerungen differenzieren lässt (Flint et al. 2015). "

From the context, perhaps the mistake is that he intended A. (n.) lilith?

There appear to be two altitude-separated Athene populations in Cyprus, one apparently in the coastal region, one inland. Whether they are different taxa or are merely different in plumage, open-country birds being generally paler than bird from wooded areas, I have no data.
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Last edited by MJB : Sunday 27th March 2016 at 12:22. Reason: Correct error.
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Old Sunday 27th March 2016, 12:48   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MJB View Post
"Die Steinkäuze auf Zypern konnten kürzlich auch als eigenständiges Taxon A. cyprius beschrieben werden,da es sich genetisch und durch seine Lautäußerungen differenzieren lässt (Flint et al. 2015)."
From the context, perhaps the mistake is that he intended A. (n.) lilith?
"The Little Owls in Cyprus can be described recently as an independent taxon A. cyprius because it can be differentiated genetically and through its vocalisations (Flint et al. 2015)."
  • Flint et al 2015. Reprising the taxonomy of Cyprus Scops Owl Otus (scops) cyprius, a neglected island endemic. Zootaxa 4040(3): 301–316.
I think Wink is definitely confused here...

PS. But Wink et al 2008 (Molecular phylogeny and systematics of owls (Strigiformes) in König & Weick 2008 (Owls of the World, 2nd ed)) recognised Athene (noctua) lilith (including the Cyprus population) as a distinct species.

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Old Sunday 27th March 2016, 13:05   #18
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It's me or they "suggest" to separate Macabra from Otus (or Megascops) ?
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Old Sunday 27th March 2016, 19:24   #19
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It's me or they "suggest" to separate Macabra from Otus (or Megascops) ?
Macabra is problematic.

Macabra Bonaparte 1854 [OD]. (The name was apparently used first [here], where it is nude.)
Originally included nominal species:
  • "hylophila Temm." = Strix hylophila Temminck 1825 - [OD] - now in use as Strix hylophila Temminck 1825
  • "fasciata Vieill." = Strix fasciata Vieillot 1817 - [OD]
  • "suinda Vieill." = Strix suinda Vieillot 1817 - [OD] - now in use as Asio flammeus suinda (Vieillot 1817)
  • "melanonota Vieill." - Vieillot did not publish such a name; has been presumed to be Noctua melanota Tschudi 1844 [OD], emended to N. melanonota by Tschudi 1845 [here] - now in use as Pulsatrix melanota (Tschudi 1844)
  • "cayanensis Gm." = Strix cayennensis Gmelin 1788 [OD]
  • "albigularis Cassin" = Syrnium albo-gularis Cassin 1849 [OD] - now in use as Megascops albogularis (Cassin 1849)
Gray 1855 [here] designated "Strix cayanensis, Gm." as the type. Strix cayennensis Gmelin is based on Buffon's "Chat-huant de Cayenne" [description] [plate] (and on Latham's "Cayenne Owl" [description], which itself is based on Buffon's bird). It is not known what this bird was.

The next subsequent type designation was apparently by Sharpe 1875 [here], who designated Syrnium hylophilum.

The name has also been used for Megascops albogularis alone (implying this is the type) by several workers, the first one possibly Wolters in Vogelarten der Erde, but I'm unclear on which base.

Penhallurick & Gregory 2001 [here] rejected Gray's designation, arguing that the bird being unidentifiable made it "invalid"; they accepted Sharpe's designation and placed the name in the synonymy of Strix. I'm unclear which provision of the Code can be used to support this interpretation, however. In my reading, as long as the designated nominal species was originally included and is denoted by an available name, the designation should be valid. If the designated type species cannot be identified, then the generic name itself cannot be identified either.
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Old Monday 28th March 2016, 15:19   #20
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Macabra is problematic.
Is Pseudociccaba Kelso, 1932 (type = albogularis) a valid alternative for this group?
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Old Monday 28th March 2016, 15:53   #21
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Is Pseudociccaba Kelso, 1932 (type = albogularis) a valid alternative for this group?
As subgenus of Megascops ?
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Old Tuesday 29th March 2016, 20:55   #22
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Strix cayanensis is the juvenile of Asio flammeus suinda Vieillot. Or so said Gray (Handlist of genera and subgenera) "Strix cayanensis, juv." and Kaup (Monograph of the Strigidae Contributions to Ornithology 1851 page 120) And so says my eyes when I look at the picture in Shaw's Vivarium naturæ or the naturalist's miscellany.
https://books.google.com/books?id=4X...sis%22&f=false .
The type of Macabra is Syrnium macabrum Bonaparte 1850 Consp.
I Don't Give a Hoot, page 123.
https://books.google.com/books?id=9s...kjBB4Q6AEIQTAH .
Peters said ; Kelso later found that the type of Macabra Bonaparte is Syrnium macabrum Bonaparte
( = Syrnium albogulare Cassin) by tautonymy and proposed Tacitathena as a new subgenus
with Strix hylophila Termninck as type.
https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/f...0179-p0186.pdf .
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Old Wednesday 30th March 2016, 11:25   #23
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Originally Posted by mb1848 View Post
Strix cayanensis is the juvenile of Asio flammeus suinda Vieillot. Or so said Gray (Handlist of genera and subgenera) "Strix cayanensis, juv." and Kaup (Monograph of the Strigidae Contributions to Ornithology 1851 page 120) And so says my eyes when I look at the picture in Shaw's Vivarium naturæ or the naturalist's miscellany.
https://books.google.com/books?id=4X...sis%22&f=false .
But, if so, suinda should be called cayennensis (as it indeed was by Kaup). Shaw's plate is but a redraw of Martinet's plate, associated to Buffon's work (link in my earlier post above). I might perhaps construe the plate as showing a Short-eared Owl; I have a much harder time with Buffon's description: the whole bird was said to be rufous, and marked, both above and below, with very thin transversal wavy barring. Short-eared Owl is streaked longitudinally below, and has no thin wavy transversal barring anywhere in the plumage.
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The type of Macabra is Syrnium macabrum Bonaparte 1850 Consp.
I Don't Give a Hoot, page 123.
https://books.google.com/books?id=9s...kjBB4Q6AEIQTAH .
Peters said ; Kelso later found that the type of Macabra Bonaparte is Syrnium macabrum Bonaparte
( = Syrnium albogulare Cassin) by tautonymy and proposed Tacitathena as a new subgenus
with Strix hylophila Termninck as type.
https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/f...0179-p0186.pdf .
OK, this is the source of the name having been used for albogularis alone, then. But this is not correct. Peters (and probably other authors of his time) accepted quite a few similar fixations "by tautonymy", due to the mere existence of a tautonymous name synonymous with one of the included species. None of these is acceptable under the present rules. To have a type fixation by tautonymy, the tautonymous species name MUST be CITED and included in the genus in the OD. (Which names are subjective synonyms of one another is taxonomy, not nomenclature: different authors might disagree on this. The type species of a generic name must in principle be determinable objectively, in a way fully independent from subjective opinions. Thus subjective synonymy cannot be used in determining the type species, unless the synonymy statement is made explicitly by the author.) This is definitely not the case here, hence Syrnium macabrum Bp is absolutely not eligible to be the type of the Macabra.

Pseudociccaba Kelso [OD] seems OK (nomenclaturally, at least).

Last edited by l_raty : Wednesday 30th March 2016 at 16:38.
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Old Wednesday 30th March 2016, 19:52   #24
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Thanks Laurent for clearing that up. And thanks for the link to Kelso 1932. I would like to see Kelso & Kelso 1937 if anyone can find that digitized? Kelso, Leon; Kelso, E. H., 1937: Supplement to the synopsis of the American Wood Owls of the genus Ciccaba. Biological Leaflets, No. 7.
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Old Wednesday 27th April 2016, 14:31   #25
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Cyprus Scops Owl

Quote:
Originally Posted by Melanie View Post
Zootaxa 4040 (3): 301–316 (11 Nov. 2015)
Reprising the taxonomy of Cyprus Scops Owl Otus (scops) cyprius, a neglected island endemic
PETER FLINT, DAVID WHALEY, GUY M. KIRWAN, MELIS CHARALAMBIDES, MANUEL SCHWEIZER & MICHAEL WINK
Abstract
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Flint et al 2015. [pdf]
Birdwatch, 26 Apr 2016: Cyprus Scops Owl a potential split.
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