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Old Saturday 14th May 2005, 19:09   #1
Chris Monk
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Bittern booming at Titchwell RSPB reserve for first time since 1991

From BBC web site:

Bittern booming at nature reserve

Experts hope the bittern population will reach 100 males by 2020

A booming bittern, one of the UK's rarest birds, has been heard at the RSPB's Titchwell Marsh reserve for the first time since 1991.

The reserve has the second largest reedbed in north Norfolk, and has just been improved for the bird by lowering the reedbed and introducing fish.

In Suffolk, nine bitterns are now booming at Minsmere and another two at North Warren near Aldeburgh.

The bittern population has increased fivefold over the past seven years.

In 1997 only 11 bitterns were found during a UK-wide survey, but in 2004, experts counted 55 bitterns at 30 sites.

Researchers use the male bittern's booming call as a method of estimating the population of this otherwise secretive bird.

Last edited by Chris Monk : Saturday 14th May 2005 at 23:11. Reason: Add missing word
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Old Saturday 14th May 2005, 19:54   #2
fr0sty
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Chris

Whilst I agree that the RSPB is doing a great job managing its reed reserves for Bittern's. Here in the Uk we do have far more wintering birds, and it should be remembered that 'booming' is not conclusive proof of a breeding bird; also many people think they can hear a booming when it is confussed with another sound!!

Also please be careful then you state locations - becuase you quite rightly say these birds are secreative and if they were breeding in an area the slightest disturbance could cause them to abandon the area
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Old Saturday 14th May 2005, 22:54   #3
Chris Monk
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Titchwell

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Originally Posted by fr0sty
Chris

Also please be careful then you state locations - becuase you quite rightly say these birds are secreative and if they were breeding in an area the slightest disturbance could cause them to abandon the area
Titchwell was named in the article on the BBC web site.

Last edited by Chris Monk : Saturday 14th May 2005 at 23:11.
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