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Old Tuesday 21st March 2017, 21:08   #1
NDhunter
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Rise of the hipster Birdwatcher.

I found this article about the rise in popularity among millenials
with birdwatching, from The Telegraph, UK.

Also called 2017's unlikeliest craze.

I like the photo that shows the enthusiasm of viewing.

Jerry
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Old Tuesday 21st March 2017, 21:47   #2
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Hi,

and here's the link ;-)

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/men/think...-bird-watcher/

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Old Tuesday 21st March 2017, 21:48   #3
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If this is true, then this is good news for us all! Millenials will start taking office in the not too far future, and having people in positions of power that value nature can only be a good thing IMO.

And hopefully they'll stop blasting music on trails
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Old Tuesday 21st March 2017, 22:04   #4
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I'm a millennial, and I just got into this. I've had an interest in optics for a bit longer, but I began researching birds this year. I see them all the time now, and I'm unsure why I didn't notice them before.
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Old Tuesday 21st March 2017, 22:46   #5
james holdsworth
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The millenials I know don't seem to ever go outside.....

It's a funny thing, the discussion about birding popularity, I just don't see it or buy it and this is based on observations around the globe, although Britain might just be completely different now. For example, I have been to tropical resorts that are known for great birding -Gamboa for one - and often never see another birder for the whole week. At a resort on the Yucatan, with probably over 3000 people present, not another pair of binocs to be seen. Surely the percentages would indicate at least a few dozen birders in groups of this size, regardless of location / season etc. People would say that travelers are not likely to bird in such a setting but if you have an interest in birds, don't you at least bring some compacts to see Yucatan Jays or whatever lifer passes by?

On top of that, things like the ABA are at near all-time low for memberships. My local reservoir, that I bird probably 100 times a year, for over 40 years now, has NEVER produced an encounter with a ''new'' birder [there are three of us, serious birders, in a city of 35,000......]
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Old Wednesday 22nd March 2017, 02:37   #6
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why go outside and run around looking like a nut case.....if you want to see birds just go to the bird section of this forum or tune into some of the nature shows ....birds from around the world and you can do it while taking a break from your video games....
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Old Wednesday 22nd March 2017, 03:04   #7
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I am with James on this one: I have spent 6 hours today at the Bird Sanctuary in Burlingame by the San Francisco airport---thousands of birds, literally, but not a single person with binoculars besides the undersigned; many millennials with cameras, none with binos.///Peter.
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Old Wednesday 22nd March 2017, 03:41   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pesto View Post
I am with James on this one: I have spent 6 hours today at the Bird Sanctuary in Burlingame by the San Francisco airport---thousands of birds, literally, but not a single person with binoculars besides the undersigned; many millennials with cameras, none with binos.///Peter.
I am not sure if i am a Millennial but i was born in the late 80s, I carry both binoculars and cameras maybe not always on the same day. I think that Birding is something that generally comes in a later stage of life, akin to collecting of any sort. I think nature observation is quite popular with the younger generation but not birding. Too fiddly for now and it takes to certain type of person maybe towards the pedantic/fastidious sort. I mean i am that sort and i see this pattern in most birding circles.

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Old Wednesday 22nd March 2017, 04:10   #9
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Certainly in Thailand, birding is becoming more popular, including kids and millennials - can only be a good thing in this part of the world, for the reasons given in post #3
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Old Wednesday 22nd March 2017, 07:13   #10
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Hi,

over here one sees twenty-somethings too at bird excursions of the local nature clubs. But I would not call those hipsters - I think that moniker implies a bit more than a certain age...

But anyways, those of them that will stay with the hobby when the hip factor wears away in a few years will adapt and be indistinguishable from other birders ;-)

Joachim
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Old Wednesday 22nd March 2017, 13:42   #11
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I lead a few bird walks each year at one of the local hotspots. I will say that though the group is typically dominated by those over 60 there does seem to be an influx of 20-somethings over the last year or so. Furthermore, some of the most hardcore birders in the state fall into the mid-late twenties category with some just a few years older.
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Old Wednesday 22nd March 2017, 16:45   #12
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Not sure either about the 'hipster' aspect, but here in NYC Central Park there is a good number of active birders aged from the teens to the late twenties.
They are enthusiastic and splendidly capable.
The combination of young eyes, good glass and full command of all the tools technology now offers makes them formidably effective.
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Old Wednesday 22nd March 2017, 16:48   #13
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Here in the middle of the UK if I visit our nearest RSPB reserve the car park is always nearly full (and has had to be extended) and the cafe is always very busy. Mostly the visitors are 'mature' but they all carry bins, quite a few of them Swaros.

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Old Wednesday 22nd March 2017, 17:13   #14
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This was being discussed elsewhere (eg on twitter, whatever that is, some of you may ask).

There has to be some doubt over their sampling techniques, surely. Also I reckon the number of hipsters visiting a local park with loving partner/and or small children <insert suitable modern names for children> to feed the ducks or visit a nice cafe who would then respond on a survey to say they'd been birdwatching must be quite high.
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Old Wednesday 22nd March 2017, 17:31   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dantheman View Post
This was being discussed elsewhere (eg on twitter, whatever that is, some of you may ask).

There has to be some doubt over their sampling techniques, surely. Also I reckon the number of hipsters visiting a local park with loving partner/and or small children <insert suitable modern names for children> to feed the ducks or visit a nice cafe who would then respond on a survey to say they'd been birdwatching must be quite high.
This is it. Many ''watch birds'' a bit, few are ''bird-watchers.''

Implying birding popularity by going to where birders congregate is invalid. If birding numbers were anywhere near what some surveys suggest, we should encounter them frequently, everywhere. Birding festivals are always going to be full of birders, but it's the visits to regular parks and vacation spots where the lack of birders is telling.

I've brought this up before - if birding really did enjoy this level of popularity, there would be shelves full of birding-related magazines and bird-related TV programming. At best, we get generic fluff like ''Birds and Blooms'' and the odd doc. on Discovery or the BBC. Sure there are specialist mags. through subscription only [Birding, NA Birds etc.] but I mean commercially available. When I look at a shelf full of mags, and see twenty publications for Horse fanciers and two for Birders, either the market is misreading things or the numbers are inaccurate.
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Old Wednesday 22nd March 2017, 21:25   #16
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Numbers of birders in US

There have been estimates of birders in the US that range as high as 70 million. IMHO these numbers do not come close to passing the laugh test. The main problem with them is how to define a "birder", and most use a very lax definition. My own preference would be to say that a birder is someone who can ID by sight or sound at least a hundred species, and for whom birding is a frequent recreational activity. If I apply that (fairly generous) criterion to my own state (Vermont), I think that I can say that there are approximately 50-100 birders in the state. Same with New Hampshire and Maine.

Like others, I am out birding 3-4 times a week in VT, NH, and Massachusetts and rarely see any others. So, where are they all? There may be lots of other folks who occasionally carry bins and look at birds on their feeders, but are they "birders"? My feeling is that if everyone is a birder then no one is a birder. If we scale up from my estimates of New England to the entire country we arrive at a total number about 20,000 to 30,000, certainly not anywhere close to 70m. Last I heard, ABA had about 9,000 members, which might fit better with my estimate.

Of course it all hinges on your definition of a birder and I am aware that the definitions of others might differ from mine, but I cannot see how it may be possible to get over 50,000 in the US.
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Old Wednesday 22nd March 2017, 21:55   #17
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I've yet to see a 'hipster' birder, although I have seen many birders with beards!
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Old Wednesday 22nd March 2017, 22:04   #18
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What surprises me most is the apparent lack of analysis on the bins carried by the dude in the original pic on here ...



...
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Old Wednesday 22nd March 2017, 22:20   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dantheman View Post
What surprises me most is the apparent lack of analysis on the bins carried by the dude in the original pic on here ...



...
Good catch, I like his strap placement. Very effective, must be
an expert birder...........

Can anyone identify the binocular ? I can't, very thin body, not
something I have seen.

Jerry
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Old Wednesday 22nd March 2017, 22:35   #20
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Being in my late 20's (I can say that for another 3 months anyways) with a beard, funny looking bobble hat and oversized thick rimmed black glasses, I really hope I'm not mistaken for a hipster. I was (and always have been) uncool, long before being uncool was ironically cool - I think that's how the hipster thing works isn't it?

I'd hardly call the torygraph a cutting edge, on the pulse, down with the kids media outlet though, but fake news seems to be all the range these days. Those bins look very cheap and nasty.
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Old Wednesday 22nd March 2017, 22:59   #21
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Can anyone identify the binocular ? I can't, very thin body, not
something I have seen.
It does not seem to have a focus wheel---must be of the perma-focus type, possibly some expensive Barskas or Hammers. What's interesting is that he uses his right hand to hold the strap in front of the objective, probably to be able to see something....
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Old Wednesday 22nd March 2017, 23:04   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by james holdsworth View Post
This is it. Many ''watch birds'' a bit, few are ''bird-watchers.''

Implying birding popularity by going to where birders congregate is invalid. If birding numbers were anywhere near what some surveys suggest, we should encounter them frequently, everywhere. Birding festivals are always going to be full of birders, but it's the visits to regular parks and vacation spots where the lack of birders is telling.

I've brought this up before - if birding really did enjoy this level of popularity, there would be shelves full of birding-related magazines and bird-related TV programming. At best, we get generic fluff like ''Birds and Blooms'' and the odd doc. on Discovery or the BBC. Sure there are specialist mags. through subscription only [Birding, NA Birds etc.] but I mean commercially available. When I look at a shelf full of mags, and see twenty publications for Horse fanciers and two for Birders, either the market is misreading things or the numbers are inaccurate.
I counted mags in my local supermarket the other day; 17 for Hunting/Fishing and 2 for Birding/watching
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Old Wednesday 22nd March 2017, 23:14   #23
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Love This! I'm one - so here is some proof :)

I was happy to come across this. I've recently got into birding and the tools and habits of birding haven't yet been fully adapted to the highly connected, over-stimulated millennial. I've recently launched a birding app, and our target is specifically this newer generation of birders. It's tricky because there aren't a lot of places to find them to get input and feedback.

So if you're one of these birding millennials, please check out our app, and let us know what you think.

The app - https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/eyel...ds/id956417417
The website - http://www.eyelovebirds.com/
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Old Thursday 23rd March 2017, 00:52   #24
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The term hipster is dumb in my opinion. I'm in my mid-40's and often see things that look like fun, and then sure enough, someone needs to slap the label hipster on it. The term nerd used to be thrown around, until they started owning half the world, so now the cool (or sometimes just older) folks needed a newer term to feel superior with.

Hopefully some of these cheaper, really good optics are bringing more people into the birding hobby. The more the better!
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Old Thursday 23rd March 2017, 01:12   #25
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It does not seem to have a focus wheel---must be of the perma-focus type, possibly some expensive Barskas or Hammers. What's interesting is that he uses his right hand to hold the strap in front of the objective, probably to be able to see something....
It seemed like a double hinged small glass, something like an older Leica 8x20.
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