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Claret Cup Cactus
Claret Cup (Echinocereus coccineus: Cactaceae) Sixteen species are represented from the genus Echinocereus in Texas with a host of infraspecific taxa. Sixteen species of the genus Echinocereus is represented in Texas with a host of infraspecific taxa. I have watched hummingbirds perch on the petal margins and bend over and sip nectar from the flowers. Photographed in the Davis Mountains, west of Fort Davis, Jeff Davis County, Texas, USA. Trans-Pecos Vegetational Area. Desert grasslands and scattered oaks at ca. 1,829 m (6,000 ft) elevation. Canon AE-1 camera with a Canon FD 100mm f/4 lens with Kodachrome 64 ASA slide film. April 1983
Habitat
Trans-Pecos Vegetational Area. Desert grasslands and scattered oaks at ca. 1,829 m (6,000 ft) elevation.
Location
Davis Mountains, west of Fort Davis, Jeff Davis County, Texas, USA
Date taken
April 1983
Scientific name
Echinocereus cccineus
Equipment used
Canon AE-1 camera with a Canon FD 100mm f/4 lens with Kodachrome 64 ASA slide film.
Opus Editor
Supporter
Three awesome images, Stanley ... with superb narrative ... great sharing ... thnx ...
 
Supporter
Lovely! Cactuses can be pretty stark, but then they bloom to beat any rose or lily! We did a desert trip one year (Arizona, Utah, Nevada). Made our "usual" California trip early that year to see the desert in Spring, but were too late for most of the cactus flowers. Only about 3 species still blooming in late May - some barrels, some ocotillos and a few century plants. Beautiful nevertheless, stunning scenery, loved the smell of sage and mesquite (or at least that's what I thought we smelled on the breeze as we drove) and loads of cultural history!
 

Media information

Category
Wild Flowers, Trees, Shrubs, Fungi
Added by
Stanley Jones
Date added
View count
90
Comment count
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