• Welcome to BirdForum, the internet's largest birding community with thousands of members from all over the world. The forums are dedicated to wild birds, birding, binoculars and equipment and all that goes with it.

    Please register for an account to take part in the discussions in the forum, post your pictures in the gallery and more.
Feel the intensity, not your equipment. Maximum image quality. Minimum weight. The new ZEISS SFL, up to 30% less weight than comparable competitors.

Plushcap - BirdForum Opus

(Redirected from Catamblyrhynchus diadema)
Nominate subspecies
Photo by Robert Scanlon
Rio Blanco, Manizales, Colombia, February 2009

Alternative name: Plush-capped Finch

Catamblyrhynchus diadema

Identification

Subspecies citrinifrons
Photo by Stanley Jones
Northeast end of Carpish Tunnel, Huánuco, Peru,August 2017

14cm (5½ in). A distinctive species.

  • Yellow forehead with stiff and plushy feathers
  • Blackish hindcrown and nape
  • Dusky lores
  • Bluish-grey upperparts and tail
  • Chestnut side of head, throat and underparts
  • Stubby bill

Sexes similar. Juveniles are very dull with dark grey forehead and forecrown and olive-greyish upperparts

Distribution

Found in the Andes of South America from Venezuela and Colombia south to Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia and northwest Argentina.
Uncommon to locally fairly common.

Taxonomy

In spite of the name, it is a member of the Tanager family (Thraupidae).

Subspecies

Three subspecies recorded[1]:

Habitat

Wet montane forest, second growth and elfin forest at or near tree-line. Mainly around Chusquea bamboo.
Occurs from 1800 to 3500m.

Behaviour

Diet

Feeds mostly on small insects and other arthropods. Takes probably some plant material.
A quite and inconspicuous species. Usually seen singly or in small groups, sometimes joining mixed-species flocks.

Forages mainly in lower half of forest, primarly in dense bamboo.

Breeding

Various breeding reports suggest breeding mainly in the west season. No other information on breeding.

Movements

Apparently a resident species.

References

  1. Clements, J. F., T. S. Schulenberg, M. J. Iliff, D. Roberson, T. A. Fredericks, B. L. Sullivan, and C. L. Wood. 2017. The eBird/Clements checklist of birds of the world: v2017, with updates to August 2017. Downloaded from http://www.birds.cornell.edu/clementschecklist/download/
  2. Del Hoyo, J, A Elliott, and D Christie, eds. 2011. Handbook of the Birds of the World. Volume 16: Tanagers to New World Blackbirds. Barcelona: Lynx Edicions. ISBN 978-8496553781

Recommended Citation

External Links

Top