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Peter Kovalik Saturday 11th June 2011 21:50

Apodidae
 
Päckert Martin, Feigl A., Wink M. & Tietze D.T., 2011. Molecular Phylogeny and historical biogeography of Swifts (Apodidae: Apus, Tachymarptis). 5th IBS conference, 7‐11.01.2011, Irakleion, Crete, Greece.

We present a near complete swift phylogeny for two closely related genera Apus and Tachymarptis based on mitochondrial and nuclear markers. Each of the two genera represents a monophyletic clade, i.e. neither of the two Tachymarptis species is nested in Apus as previously considered. Genus Apus comprises four major clades two of which comprise both Palearctic and Afrotropic species. One exclusively Asian clade represents a basal split from the Apus tree; its phylogeographic structure contradicts current systematics of Himalayan and Southeast Asian species.
A large second clade comprises all European species together with those of the Macaronesian islands and four further Afrotropical species. Branch lengths are considerably short and two terminal taxa (A. apus and A. pallidus) cannot be reliably distinguished by any of the genetic markers used. Internal topology of the Apus tree suggests multiple events of faunal interchange between the Palearctic and the Afrotropics during a considerably short evolutionary time frame. Discussion of historical biogeography is based on ancestral range reconstructions and molecular dating.

http://www.biogeography.org/html/Mee...-abstracts.pdf

Markus Lagerqvist Sunday 12th June 2011 07:34

Does anyone have access to the full findings - are they published yet?
Sounds very interesting!

Peter Kovalik Wednesday 15th February 2012 05:56

Martin Päckert, Jochen Martens, Michael Wink, Anna Feigl, Dieter Thomas Tietze, 2012. Molecular phylogeny of Old World swifts (Aves: Apodiformes, Apodidae, Apus and Tachymarptis) based on mitochondrial and nuclear markers. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, In Press.
Abstract

Richard Klim Wednesday 15th February 2012 08:45

Päckert et al
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Peter Kovalik (Post 2363820)
Martin Päckert, Jochen Martens, Michael Wink, Anna Feigl, Dieter Thomas Tietze, 2012. Molecular phylogeny of Old World swifts (Aves: Apodiformes, Apodidae, Apus and Tachymarptis) based on mitochondrial and nuclear markers. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, In Press.
Abstract

Little support for split of Apus [affinis] nipalensis.

A pity that Apus (pacificus) salimalii and A (p) leuconyx were not sampled.

pietrod Wednesday 15th February 2012 15:24

Interesting indeed!

Did you try to build the tree without the Collocaliini and Cheaturini to see if they make some sort of attraction?

Really interesting the situation of the spanish caffer! It must need further sampling indeed. Like this it looks more like an arctifact.

And also the position of pallidus/apus makes me wonder how these guys have reached such a good level of ecologic differentation in sympatry without achieve or had achieved genetic differences!! I really would be curious about the biogeography of these species!

bests

Daniel Philippe Wednesday 16th April 2014 08:39

Streptoprocne
 
I am looking for this article:

RIBEIRO, J. , TORRES, R. A. , ADAM, M.L. & CORNÉLIO , D.A., 2003. Cytotaxonomic diagnoses of two Neotropical swift species: Streptoprocne biscutata and Streptoprocne zonaris (Aves: Apodidae) Zootaxa 224: 1-7.

I would appreciate it if someone could help. By the way, while searching on the net, I came across this one.

Daniel Philippe Wednesday 16th April 2014 16:44

Quote:

Originally Posted by Daniel Philippe (Post 2969108)
I am looking for this article:

Got it :t:

Richard Klim Saturday 17th January 2015 06:57

Apodini
 
Tietze, Wink & Päckert (in press). Does evolution of plumage patterns and of migratory behaviour in Apodini swifts (Aves: Apodiformes) follow distributional range shifts? PeerJ PrePrints 3: e797v1. [abstract] [pdf]

PS. Päckert et al 2012. Mol Phylogenet Evol 63(3): 606–616. [pdf]

Peter Kovalik Thursday 14th January 2016 09:36

Chaetura pelagica
 
Xiao-Qiang Xu & Kai Zhang. Complete mitochondrial genome and phylogenetic analysis of the chimney swift, Chaetura pelagica. Mitochondrial DNA: The Journal of DNA Mapping, Sequencing, and Analysis. Latest articles.

Abstract:

The chimney swift (Chaetura pelagica) is a bird belonging to the swift family, Apodidae, a member of the genus Chaetur. Here, we report the complete mitogenome sequence of C. pelagica, which was 16 892 bp and contained 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes and 1 non-coding control region. Phylogenic tree was constructed based on the complete mitogenome of C. pelagica and closely related 11 closely related species to estimate their phylogenic relationship and to approve the accuracy. The complete mitochondrial genome of the C. pelagica would provide more information for the research of C. pelagica and the evolution of Apodidae family.

l_raty Wednesday 30th August 2017 15:10

Apus pallidus & A. apus
 
Pellegrino, Cucco, Harvey, Liberatore, Pavia, Voelker, Boano. 2017. So similar and yet so different: taxonomic status of Pallid Swift Apus pallidus and Common Swift Apus apus. Bird Study.
[abstract & suppl.]

lewis20126 Wednesday 30th August 2017 15:25

Quote:

Originally Posted by l_raty (Post 3609561)
Pellegrino, Cucco, Harvey, Liberatore, Pavia, Voelker, Boano. 2017. So similar and yet so different: taxonomic status of Pallid Swift Apus pallidus and Common Swift Apus apus. Bird Study.
[abstract & suppl.]

Thanks Laurent. I only seem to be able to find the abstract. Do you know if pekinensis was sampled at all? Or whether other 'close' relatives were included in the study?

Thanks again

Alan

l_raty Wednesday 30th August 2017 15:43

Quote:

Originally Posted by lewis20126 (Post 3609565)
Thanks Laurent. I only seem to be able to find the abstract. Do you know if pekinensis was sampled at all? Or whether other 'close' relatives were included in the study?

For the supplements, click on the "Supplemental" tab just above the abstract (or go [here]).

All the A. apus in this study were from Italy. The 'closest' relative included was an A. bradfieldi.

----------
PS - An older paper, which I did not know:

Randi, Boano. 1993. Genetic divergence between Pallid and Common Swifts. Avocetta 17:107-110.
[pdf here]

LeNomenclatoriste Monday 21st May 2018 14:56

TiF Update May 20

Chaetura Swifts: Continuing the Ridgely splits (Ridgely and Greenfield, 2001), I've split Tumbes Swift, Chaetura ocypetes, from Short-tailed Swift, Chaetura brachyura.
[Apodidae, Apodiformes, 3.09]

Peter Kovalik Thursday 12th July 2018 09:43

Chaetura
 
R. Terry Chesser, Haley Vaseghi, Peter A. Hosner, Laura M. Bergner, M.Nandadevi Cortes-Rodriguez, Andreanna J.Welch, Charles T. Collins. Molecular systematics of swifts of the genus Chaetura (Aves: Apodiformes: Apodidae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution
Available online 11 July 2018, In Press, Accepted Manuscript.

Abstract:

Phylogenetic relationships among swifts of the morphologically conservative genus Chaetura were studied using mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences. Taxon sampling included all species and 21 of 30 taxa (species and subspecies) within Chaetura. Our results indicate that Chaetura is monophyletic and support the division of the genus into the two subgenera previously identified using plumage characters. However, our genetic data, when considered in combination with phenotypic data, appear to be at odds with the current classification of some species of Chaetura. We recommend that C. viridipennis, currently generally treated as specifically distinct from C. chapmani, be returned to its former status as C. chapmani viridipennis, and that C. andrei, now generally regarded as synonymous with C. vauxi aphanes, again be recognized as a valid species. Widespread Neotropical species C. spinicaudus is paraphyletic with respect to more range-restricted species C. fumosa, C. egregia, and C. martinica. Geographically structured genetic variation within some other species of Chaetura, especially notable in C. cinereiventris, suggests that future study may lead to recognition of additional species in this genus. Biogeographic analysis indicated that Chaetura originated in South America and identified several dispersal events to Middle and North America following the formation of the Isthmus of Panama.

CaliSteve Sunday 28th April 2019 11:35

Deemed more likely that Schoutedenapus schoutedeni represent darker juvenile or sub-adult Scarce Swifts (Schoutedenapus myoptilus) of subspecies chapini.

Fishpool, L. D. C. (2019) A reappraisal of Schouteden’s Swift. Bull ABC 26(1): 38-57.

LeNomenclatoriste Sunday 28th April 2019 12:05

Quote:

Originally Posted by CaliSteve (Post 3843352)
Bull ABC

What does it mean?

Peter Kovalik Sunday 28th April 2019 13:17

Quote:

Originally Posted by LeNomenclatoriste (Post 3843364)
What does it mean?

Bulletins of the African Bird Club

https://www.africanbirdclub.org/bulletins/index

Peter Kovalik Monday 6th May 2019 19:05

Schoutedenapus schoutedeni
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by CaliSteve (Post 3843352)
Deemed more likely that Schoutedenapus schoutedeni represent darker juvenile or sub-adult Scarce Swifts (Schoutedenapus myoptilus) of subspecies chapini.

Fishpool, L. D. C. (2019) A reappraisal of Schouteden’s Swift. Bull ABC 26(1): 38-57.

BirdLife's Globally Threatened Bird Forums

Schoutedden’s Swift (Schoutedenapus schoutedeni): no longer a valid taxon.

[link]

LeNomenclatoriste Tuesday 7th May 2019 16:38

Quote:

Originally Posted by CaliSteve (Post 3843352)
Deemed more likely that Schoutedenapus schoutedeni represent darker juvenile or sub-adult Scarce Swifts (Schoutedenapus myoptilus) of subspecies chapini.

Fishpool, L. D. C. (2019) A reappraisal of Schouteden’s Swift. Bull ABC 26(1): 38-57.

Can we obtain this paper?

Nutcracker Wednesday 8th May 2019 11:30

Quote:

Originally Posted by LeNomenclatoriste (Post 3846625)
Can we obtain this paper?

I'd think only by buying a copy at the link in post #17 - it doesn't have a DOI number so can't be got through sci-hub.

LeNomenclatoriste Wednesday 8th May 2019 11:38

Tristesse :-C

Nutcracker Wednesday 8th May 2019 13:47

Quote:

Originally Posted by LeNomenclatoriste (Post 3846953)
Tristesse :-C

Yep. But at least it is produced by a bird club, so buying it (a) supports a worthy cause, and (b) you won't be forced to pay €50 per page or whatever the big publishers charge now to cover for their fat cat pay :storm:

Peter Kovalik Tuesday 14th May 2019 13:29

Schoutedenapus schoutedeni
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by CaliSteve (Post 3843352)
Deemed more likely that Schoutedenapus schoutedeni represent darker juvenile or sub-adult Scarce Swifts (Schoutedenapus myoptilus) of subspecies chapini.

Fishpool, L. D. C. (2019) A reappraisal of Schouteden’s Swift. Bull ABC 26(1): 38-57.

IOC Updates Diary May 13

Accept lump of Schouteden’s Swift

CaliSteve Thursday 16th May 2019 20:02

Quote:

Originally Posted by CaliSteve (Post 3843352)
Deemed more likely that Schoutedenapus schoutedeni represent darker juvenile or sub-adult Scarce Swifts (Schoutedenapus myoptilus) of subspecies chapini.

Fishpool, L. D. C. (2019) A reappraisal of Schouteden’s Swift. Bull ABC 26(1): 38-57.

A reappraisal of Schouteden’s Swift Schoutedenapus schoutedeni.

Quote:

A reappraisal is presented of Schouteden’s Swift Schoutedenapus schoutedeni, a species unknown in life, recognised from only five specimens and whose validity has been questioned. I present details of two further, hitherto overlooked specimens attributed to the taxon by its original describer Prigogine, also collected in the Itombwe region of DR Congo, whence all other specimens originate. The case for its status as a species is re-assessed. Variation in plumage coloration and in size and proportion of the tail of the sympatric race of the very similar-looking Scarce Swift S. myoptilus chapini is described and illustrated for the first time. Characters considered diagnostic of S. schoutedeni—the dark chin, throat, lores and frons, and the short, round-tipped outermost rectrix—also occur in some specimens of S. m. chapini. No firm evidence has been found to support assertions that specimens of S. schoutedeni are adult, upon which rests much of the case for the validity of the taxon. The published method for distinguishing juvenile, subadult and adult S. m. chapini—based upon the progressive decrease in width and increase in emargination of the outer tail feathers, whereby the sharply pointed, strongly emarginated outermost rectrix of the adult is not assumed until after the second moult—is supported herein. No significant differences were found between measurements of three tail parameters of S. schoutedeni and those of the combined sample of juvenile and subadult S. m. chapini, while application of the method of ageing S. m. chapini to the seven skins of S. schoutedeni suggests that three resemble juveniles, two correspond to subadults, and one appears to be adult, while the seventh is, because of damage, unclassifiable. Variation in tail shape and proportion within S. schoutedeni appears to mirror that associated with maturation in S. m. chapini, casting further doubt on the likelihood that the type material of S. schoutedeni is adult. The possibility that schoutedeni is a race of S. myoptilus—prompted in part by the fact that the two newly rediscovered specimens are so labelled—is A reappraisal of Schouteden’s Swift: Fishpool Bull ABC Vol 26 No 1 (2019) – 39 considered but believed to be highly improbable. The explanation which best fits the data is that the birds on which the name schoutedeni is based are simply dark-plumaged, mainly juvenile or subadult S. m. chapini.
https://www.africanbirdclub.org/bull...us-schoutedeni


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