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-   -   Astro Paradise for the Bucket List .... (https://www.birdforum.net/showthread.php?t=383250)

Chosun Juan Thursday 7th November 2019 10:07

Astro Paradise for the Bucket List ....
 
One for the astrophotographers or the dedicated night sky binocular viewers ...... :cool:

"The International Dark-Sky Association (IDA) has officially named the new River Murray International Dark Sky Reserve, in South Australia's Mid Murray district, as one of the most magnificent places on Earth to see the night sky."

https://m.facebook.com/story.php?sto...cus_composer=0
https://www.9news.com.au/national/so...d=Social-9News





Chosun :gh:

Binastro Thursday 7th November 2019 11:13

Hi Chosun,

Unfortunately some of these dark sky parks, although very dark, still have distant light glow.

Hopefully, in this Australian reserve, there really are no visible light glows in the distance.

With the latitude of Australia it might be free of auroral light.

I wonder if there is anywhere left on Earth with absolutely no human caused light glow.
Also no aircraft lights and no artificial satellites.

Regards,
B.

etudiant Thursday 7th November 2019 16:02

Quote:

Originally Posted by Binastro (Post 3916469)
Hi Chosun,


I wonder if there is anywhere left on Earth with absolutely no human caused light glow.
Also no aircraft lights and no artificial satellites.

Regards,
B.

the answer is clearly no even today. There are some 5000 satellites currently in orbit. Firms are already planning to add several tens of thousands more to provide global internet links, so astronomers will be forced into space to find uncluttered skies.

[email protected] Thursday 7th November 2019 16:13

1 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by Chosun Juan (Post 3916458)
One for the astrophotographers or the dedicated night sky binocular viewers ...... :cool:

"The International Dark-Sky Association (IDA) has officially named the new River Murray International Dark Sky Reserve, in South Australia's Mid Murray district, as one of the most magnificent places on Earth to see the night sky."

https://m.facebook.com/story.php?sto...cus_composer=0
https://www.9news.com.au/national/so...d=Social-9News





Chosun :gh:

The best southern night sky I have ever seen in my life is Milford Sound in New Zealand once the the bar closes. Absolutely no distant light glow because you are in a sound. I spent half the night observing with my binoculars wishing I had a big light bucket Dobsonian telescope.

wllmspd Thursday 7th November 2019 20:01

Excellent news!! All IDA recognised sites engage with the surrounding councils and residents and report on their activities and (quite often) repeat the SQM sky brightness readings to monitor how the sites are changing. Great news to see more recognised. They might not all be perfect, but they show wider engagement and commitment to recognising the impact of light pollution and ways to keep it under control. Nice to know how dark these places actually are.. helps to plan where I might want to go on holiday!

Peter

NDhunter Saturday 9th November 2019 01:09

1 Attachment(s)
The foremost place for observatories is on the Big Island of Hawaii. The Moana Kea Observatories are at the summit, over 13,000 ft. There are 13 telescopes funded by 11 different countries.
The reasons are simple, very dark skies from the lack of light pollution, high elevation and the low humidity at this area.
It is easy to get to Hawaii and also to get a tour at the summit, sorry no chance to view at an observatory unless you have made very special arrangements.
Very cold up there, with snow year around, our tour provided heavy parkas.
I was there last year, we stopped for an observation viewing at the visitor center down at mid mountain.
The star show is incredible.

Jerry

etudiant Saturday 9th November 2019 21:45

Quote:

Originally Posted by NDhunter (Post 3917318)
The foremost place for observatories is on the Big Island of Hawaii. The Moana Kea Observatories are at the summit, over 13,000 ft. There are 13 telescopes funded by 11 different countries.
The reasons are simple, very dark skies from the lack of light pollution, high elevation and the low humidity at this area.
It is easy to get to Hawaii and also to get a tour at the summit, sorry no chance to view at an observatory unless you have made very special arrangements.
Very cold up there, with snow year around, our tour provided heavy parkas.
I was there last year, we stopped for an observation viewing at the visitor center down at mid mountain.
The star show is incredible.

Jerry

:t: :t:
The Moana Kea skies are just amazing, a rare place where is is easy to see the zodiacal light after watching for the green flash at sunset (the latter is harder, clouds on the horizon are a killer).
The visitor center is near the astronomer residence, a very friendly bunch in my limited experience. With luck some of them will be there to point out interesting stars.
PS: bring spare batteries, the scenery is spectacular and batteries lose power when it is cold.

Kevin Conville Sunday 10th November 2019 06:55

Quote:

Originally Posted by NDhunter (Post 3917318)
The foremost place for observatories is on the Big Island of Hawaii. The Moana Kea Observatories are at the summit, over 13,000 ft. There are 13 telescopes funded by 11 different countries.
The reasons are simple, very dark skies from the lack of light pollution, high elevation and the low humidity at this area.
It is easy to get to Hawaii and also to get a tour at the summit, sorry no chance to view at an observatory unless you have made very special arrangements.
Very cold up there, with snow year around, our tour provided heavy parkas.
I was there last year, we stopped for an observation viewing at the visitor center down at mid mountain.
The star show is incredible.

Jerry

You forget to mention stable air (low shimmer) because it's in the middle of the Pacific.

Kevin Conville Sunday 10th November 2019 06:59

Quote:

Originally Posted by [email protected] (Post 3916582)
The best southern night sky I have ever seen in my life is Milford Sound in New Zealand once the the bar closes. Absolutely no distant light glow because you are in a sound. I spent half the night observing with my binoculars wishing I had a big light bucket Dobsonian telescope.

I think the best night sky I ever saw also was in New Zealand. Just up the road from Milford Sound on the east side of Mt Cook. I can envision Milford Sound being pretty awesome, but I wasn't there at night.

Chosun Juan Sunday 10th November 2019 07:50

Quote:

Originally Posted by [email protected] (Post 3916582)
The best southern night sky I have ever seen in my life is Milford Sound in New Zealand once the the bar closes. Absolutely no distant light glow because you are in a sound. I spent half the night observing with my binoculars wishing I had a big light bucket Dobsonian telescope.

Beautiful beautiful place :t:

but ........ the sandflies! Jaysuz !! It's like a living h*ll on earth !!! :eek!:

Yeeeeeeee-ouch !!!!





Chosun :gh:

[email protected] Sunday 10th November 2019 15:52

B (:
Quote:

Originally Posted by Chosun Juan (Post 3917699)
Beautiful beautiful place :t:

but ........ the sandflies! Jaysuz !! It's like a living h*ll on earth !!! :eek!:

Yeeeeeeee-ouch !!!!





Chosun :gh:

I didn't notice those. I try too keep enough alcohol in my blood so if a fly bites me it drops dead.B (:

Chosun Juan Sunday 10th November 2019 16:51

Quote:

Originally Posted by Chosun Juan (Post 3917699)
Beautiful beautiful place :t:

but ........ the sandflies! Jaysuz !! It's like a living h*ll on earth !!! :eek!:

Yeeeeeeee-ouch !!!!

Quote:

Originally Posted by [email protected] (Post 3917794)
B (:
I didn't notice those. I try too keep enough alcohol in my blood so if a fly bites me it drops dead.B (:

They seem to be less active at night - though a citronella candle or three helps.

Come sunrise though - Holy Hector !

I'm a Celebrity - Get me Outta Here !! :-O




Chosun :gh:

Gijs van Ginkel Sunday 10th November 2019 22:04

Binastro, post 11,
In the South African and Namibian deserts we were not disturbed by interfering light from human light sources yielding magnificent star nights.
Gijs van Ginkel

Troubador Monday 11th November 2019 09:01

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gijs van Ginkel (Post 3917918)
Binastro, post 11,
In the South African and Namibian deserts we were not disturbed by interfering light from human light sources yielding magnificent star nights.
Gijs van Ginkel

Its the same on some of the Scottish islands too.

Lee

Gijs van Ginkel Monday 11th November 2019 09:30

Lee, post 14,
That does not surprise me........
Gijs van Ginkel

Binastro Monday 11th November 2019 11:17

Gijs and Lee.

That is good to know.

Regards,
B.

Kevin Conville Monday 11th November 2019 19:36

1 Attachment(s)
For the darkest skies it's fairly apparent one will have to leave Europe or the US, and quite a few other places in the Northern Hemisphere especially.

The Outback of Australia and Namibia indeed do look very dark. Too bad this image doesn't show NZ

Kevin Conville Monday 11th November 2019 19:46

1 Attachment(s)
This shows NZ. I pointed (approximately) where Milford Sound is

Binastro Monday 11th November 2019 21:48

Thanks Kevin,

I tried to see the Mercury transit today with a filtered Canon 10x30IS Mk II, but cloud won and I didn't see it.
Others saw it with filtered binoculars.

Regards,
B.

Tringa45 Monday 11th November 2019 23:04

Quote:

Originally Posted by Binastro (Post 3918342)
I tried to see the Mercury transit today with a filtered Canon 10x30IS Mk II, but cloud won and I didn't see it.

Same here, a futile wait for a gap in the clouds - very disappointing.

John

Patudo Tuesday 12th November 2019 00:07

I'm not an astro guy at all but keep telling myself next time there is a clear night in the Canary Islands I ought to point the binoculars upwards and have a look around. But the famous observatories there are much higher than most of the places I've visited - above the cloud layer.

In Cape Verde the skies are clearer, and with little light pollution in that neck of the woods, I have on a number of occasions looked up and enjoyed some nice views, albeit with only the Mk I eyeball. This was before binoculars became an everyday part of my life. But the one time that the beauty and immensity of the night sky truly struck me was travelling back to an island in the north of the Maldives after an unsuccessful attempt at finding a fish buoy to the north. The north-bound current took us a good way further out than I had thought, so by nightfall we were still quite a way from landfall. It was a clear night and as I looked up I could see what seemed like countless clusters of stars across the sky, but unfortunately I was in little mood to enjoy what I did realize was an awe-inspiring view, being more concerned about toting up how much water we had and so on... Only after the transmission tower we were using as a landmark finally appeared did I begin to appreciate what I was seeing - by far the best view of the stars I have ever seen or will probably ever see.

I swore that night I'd learn the rudiments of celestial navigation, but haven't yet - something I really ought to put right.

SteveTS Tuesday 12th November 2019 06:07

Quote:

Originally Posted by Troubador (Post 3917997)
Its the same on some of the Scottish islands too.

Lee

Pleased that someone is flying the flag :t:

Ten years ago the International Dark-Sky Association designated Galloway Forest Park in Scotland as only the fourth Dark Sky Park in the world and the first in the UK.

Galloway's International Dark Sky Park.

Regards, Steve

Chosun Juan Tuesday 10th December 2019 14:36

Geminid meteor shower in a couple of days ....
 
https://www.google.com.au/amp/s/amp....0-f8cace881620





Chosun :gh:

[email protected] Tuesday 10th December 2019 16:07

1 Attachment(s)
Another great dark sky spot in the states is Kitt Peak Observatory in Arizona. They have overnight observing where you can spend all night observing through different scopes.

Kitt Peak hosts an array of programs for the public to take part in, including:

Daytime tours, speaking about the history of the observatory as well as touring a major research telescope.
The Nightly Observing Program (NOP), which allows visitors to arrive in the late afternoon, watch the sunset, and use binoculars and telescopes to view the cosmos.
Additionally, there is the Overnight Telescope Observing Program (OTOP). This program allows for a one-on-one, full night of observing using any of the visitor center's telescopes. Guests may choose to do DSLR imaging, CCD imaging, or simply take in the sights with their eye to the telescope.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kitt_P...al_Observatory

opisska Tuesday 10th December 2019 16:22

There are various Dark-sky reserves even in Czech Republic, but the point there is not to mark the darkest places on Earth but to conserve the best there is in the area, as good as it gets.

Looking for dark places (with good weather) around the world is incidentally somewhat a part of my job. The Canary islands are mildly disappointing in this regard, especially Tenerife, which we have actually rejected as a site for an observatory because the sky background was too high. We then moved it to La Palma, where terrain is less favourable (we need quite a lot of space, which there isn't) but the sky is much darker - the whole island has policies about outdoor lights and the sea of clouds usually covers most of the settlements, so the peak of Roque de Los Muchachos is really dark. It's not like you really can't find traces of human light pollution - the sea of clouds is always visibly illuminated - but it's the best place within EU territory as far as I know.

Somebody mentioned Arizona and that indeed has some brilliant sites (we studied some there) but even the best have detectable artificial light spots on the horizon. I honestly don't remember how it is in Namibia, where the HESS experiment site in the north and a private farm in the south were studied, but I roughly recall the farm (near Aus, inland from Svakopmund) was virtually perfect.

However for me personally the greatest night sky I have ever seen was in SW Bolivia - it's not only about darkness, but also clarity and there the combination of dry desert and high altitude really does wonders. The close second would be Paranal Observatory in Chilean Atacama - no wonder it's the site of some of the largest astronomical telescopes (with the largest ever now in construction), it has not been chosen randomly. There are faint signs of artificial sources in distance, but again, the combination of altitude (this time more reasonable than 4000+ in Bolivia) and dryness mean that very little light gets scattered, so the experience is virtually pure.


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