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-   -   90's Trinovid 10x25 neck strap detach (https://www.birdforum.net/showthread.php?t=375159)

FEO Tuesday 9th April 2019 21:39

90's Trinovid 10x25 neck strap detach
 
2 Attachment(s)
Hello there, does anyone know how to detach the neck strap of a 90's model trinovids 10x25? It appears to have some kind of lug that won't unscrew.

Newer 10x25 trinoids have a different kind of latch.

Thank you everyone.

Binastro Wednesday 10th April 2019 16:20

FEO welcome.

I don't know, but does the eyecup above unscrew with little force?

P.S.
I just looked at my newer Trinovid 10x25 BCA and I don't know how the strap ring comes off.
So wait for informed advice from someone who knows.

Mike F Wednesday 10th April 2019 17:09

I have the same era 10x25 and I've never worked it out either(!), but it's only a thin cord so it's never bothered me or got in the way.....

Swissboy Wednesday 10th April 2019 19:45

Quote:

Originally Posted by FEO (Post 3837130)
Hello there, does anyone know how to detach the neck strap of a 90's model trinovids 10x25? It appears to have some kind of lug that won't unscrew.

Newer 10x25 trinoids have a different kind of latch.

Thank you everyone.

That's interesting, I have an 8x20 model of about the same period, and things look exactly alike. The strange thing to me is that I had never given this any thought. As I usually adjust strap lengths which I had obviously never felt a need for in this case.

To me, it looks like they simply melted the ends in there to fix them. Some controlled heat probably would not have affected the optics?

On my model, the orientation of the lugs is not sideways but instead oriented towards the person wearing the binoculars.

Binastro Wednesday 10th April 2019 20:20

The photo of the ring holding the cord in post #1 looks similar to mine.
They could be the same rings.

I suppose one could carefully drill out the cord and leave as is, or insert the new type cord.

I have not attached the cord to mine.

The Docter 10x25 has a cord attached. I never even bothered to see if it comes off.
The image with my 10x25 Trinovid is considerably brighter than the old Docter 10x25. The edge performance is sharper in the Trinovid. But the Trinovid has a bit more edge CA.
However, I use the Docter 10x25 as it is so fast to use. The Trinovid is fiddly, more jewel like. Small focus wheel, and more difficult to get the right IPD.
So for me image brightness is not the major factor.

Alexis Powell Wednesday 10th April 2019 20:45

I have one of those and I adjusted the cord a long time ago. The end of the cord is simply cut and melted. I wanted my cord shorter and I didn't trust the melted ends to hold things, so I used something like a thick needle to push the cord downwards (by inserting the needle into the cord from above the eyelet and pushing downwards) on each side, then shortened the cord by tieing a knot in each end (much more secure--won't pull through the eyelet) and trimming the excess.

--AP

MandoBear Thursday 11th April 2019 11:26

Alexis's report matches my experience. The ends of the cord are either fused together or moulded into a wedge-shaped chock which fits into the eyelet on the eyecup. It's just necessary to use a stout needle (or bodkin) or a piece of wire to push the chock downward (ie. push through from the cord side) to disengage the little plastic chock or wedge from the eyelet. You can then pull the cord through and out and attach whatever suits your needs.

Mike F Thursday 11th April 2019 11:40

Quote:

Originally Posted by MandoBear (Post 3837593)
Alexis's report matches my experience. The ends of the cord are either fused together or moulded into a wedge-shaped chock which fits into the eyelet on the eyecup.

That's what I had always assumed - I've just never tried to take the cord off.......

FEO Thursday 11th April 2019 17:01

Thank you all, and thanks for the info Alexis and Mando. Myself like Mike F also assumed it was a melted end I just couldn't conceive Leica doing something like that. Any how I guess thats why they changed the design.
The nylon cord is in fact very comfortable, unfortunately snapped right in the middle and I thought such a fine piece of optics deserved something better than a square knot.
Believe it or not I couldn't find a single pice of information on this subject in the whole www until I came to this forum. Congratulations!

Kevin Conville Thursday 11th April 2019 17:42

I had a pair of Leitz Trinovid 10x25s c.1982 and the ring that held the cord was on an eyecup, which broke. Hard plastic on these and your photo looks to depict an aluminum part?
I made a length of cord with hangman's knots at both ends which were placed around both slide out eyecups and cinched. This worked perfectly.

I used them like this for a few years and, curious, then contacted Leica to see if I could get a replacement part. I was told the part was no longer available but that they would give me a credit for the full retail amount for the Leica versions as per 2001 when this dialog occurred.
This amounted to $500 or so of which I applied to a pair of Leica 8x32 BNs and I think my balance was about $475. I originally paid $225. for the Leitz.

Etiennef Sunday 26th May 2019 14:33

Anyone know where you can get an original strap (the new Q-version) replacement in Europe? I only saw this in Leica store Miami, but it feels silly to order from the other side of the world when it surely must be available here as well...

https://leicastoremiami.com/products...14446070890540

fazalmajid Sunday 26th May 2019 14:54

Call your local Leica support. Leica USA have always sent me complimentary replacements when I tore an objective cap or broke my Trinovid 8x20 strap.

Etiennef Monday 27th May 2019 18:33

Quote:

Originally Posted by fazalmajid (Post 3853373)
Call your local Leica support. Leica USA have always sent me complimentary replacements when I tore an objective cap or broke my Trinovid 8x20 strap.

Thanks for the suggestion. I have a replacement strap on the way from the "headquarters" now. :t:

Very good service!

I was in fact expecting them to give me an item number or similar to request from my local dealer. That happened when I asked about eye cups a few months back. This is of course better. :)

Hans Weigum Tuesday 11th June 2019 14:35

Leicas solution to fix the strap in the lugs by having their ends molten, only seems to be primitive, and the assumption, that a knot being better is wishful. Comparable research has shown, that molten (cast) rope end connections reach above 90% of breaking strength of the rope, whereas knots are down to less than 60%.

Additionally: Simple knots, specially out of polymer, and not under constant load, have a natural tendency of loosening without supplemetary means.


https://www.lexcocable.com/wire-rope-fittings.html
http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/arc...p/t-69463.html

https://trinitysling.com/wire-rope-fittings/
https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Knotenfestigkeit

https://geyaomachinery.blogspot.com/...d-sockets.html

https://interestingengineering.com/e...es-come-untied

The solution of choice for the case presented startinging this thread could be so simple:

Let the end of the properly fitting string out of suitable polymer protrude by about twice its diameter out of the lug . Melt it, preferebly by air with as low temperature setting as possible (instead of a open flame not to burn the material). Then carefully retract the still molten and bulged end into the bore.

It needs a lot of belief in brand names, to search for an original sparepart even in case of a simple piece of string.

HW

Alexis Powell Tuesday 11th June 2019 16:50

I don't find the knot solution to be at all problematic. Maybe in another universe or given infinite time! :)

True that some types of rope are prone to untying themselves with a bit of jostling, but not the material of which the Leica strap is made. When I cut the excess, I use a heated cutter so as to fuse the end to prevent fraying, and I apply Dritz Fray Check or similar to the knot. I use the same technique in many other applications and haven't yet had a knot fail (in 30 or so years, using this method with scores of knots in long-term applications). I prefer the figure-eight knot for this application, by the way. It's a good stopper knot, would easy to see if it were coming loose, and is possible to untie if one wishes to remove the strap.

Also true that (some types of) knots can dramatically reduce rope strength, but given that the Leica strap material can supports at least a hundred kilograms, I don't think this is a concern given that the bins are only a fraction of a kg in mass. Maybe, instead, we should be using breakaway clasps (like on cat collars) as a safety measure!

--AP

Hans Weigum Friday 14th June 2019 07:38

Quote:

Originally Posted by Alexis Powell (Post 3858959)
I don't find the knot solution to be at all problematic. Maybe in another universe or given infinite time! :)

True that some types of rope are prone to untying themselves with a bit of jostling, but not the material of which the Leica strap is made. When I cut the excess, I use a heated cutter so as to fuse the end to prevent fraying, and I apply Dritz Fray Check or similar to the knot. I use the same technique in many other applications and haven't yet had a knot fail (in 30 or so years, using this method with scores of knots in long-term applications). I prefer the figure-eight knot for this application, by the way. It's a good stopper knot, would easy to see if it were coming loose, and is possible to untie if one wishes to remove the strap.

Also true that (some types of) knots can dramatically reduce rope strength, but given that the Leica strap material can supports at least a hundred kilograms, I don't think this is a concern given that the bins are only a fraction of a kg in mass. Maybe, instead, we should be using breakaway clasps (like on cat collars) as a safety measure!

--AP


Dear Alexis
I appreciate you particular sense of humour. Fully agreed, that your knot solution is not problematic here, provided additional measures got taken against loosening as you suggested yourself. A piece of dried chewing gum stuck at the end of the string might be sufficient as well, considering the limited load requirements.
But please explain to me, why you suggest your solution as an improvement over the original design, when my references clearly show the opposite?

HW

Alexis Powell Friday 14th June 2019 18:42

Likewise, I appreciate your attention to mechanical detail.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Hans Weigum (Post 3859692)
...please explain to me, why you suggest your solution as an improvement over the original design, when my references clearly show the opposite?...

I don't doubt that cast ends maintain cord strength (since they don't involve the rope cutting against itself), and that they can also provide a secure connection if the fused material is strong enough not to shear off in the strap eyelet. On my bins, I wasn't convinced that the amount of fused material was substantial enough to be secure long term (Just a very thin sliver that seemed only to be what was left after cutting the cord with a hot blade), and I wanted the cord to be shorter and possible to remove for washing.

Nowadays a lot of mini-straps (including those for the Leica Ultravid pocket bins) come with mini-buckles, which are prone to loosening and which can scratch the bin in storage. Knotting the ends of a mini-strap after passing it through the strap eyelets is my universal approach to dealing with these straps so that I can do away with all the buckles and have a more secure attachment. Perhaps I haven't fully appreciated Leica's elegant solution of yesteryear.

--AP


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