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  1. P

    North East England

    Cheers, Deb, and thanks for taking the time to reply.
  2. P

    North East England

    Hi Deb, It's been very helpful. For example, I now have a very good idea of what a female reed bunting looks like, whereas I didn't before this conversation. In terms of the sparrowhawk, I take the general point that colour and an assessment of size within a minute time frame can be deceiving...
  3. P

    North East England

    Hi Deb, I'm still not wholly sold on the female reed bunting because the yellow seemed much sharper, but given other markings it does seem a good possibility. With a bit of luck I'll see this bird again down there and take notice of a few other things that would make it more certain. On the...
  4. P

    North East England

    Thanks Deb. Of all the birds mentioned the female Reed Bunting you mention is easily the closest, outside of a shore lark. The one in your link not particularly, but I've just had a look at other pictures and from certain angles, yes, lots of similarities. The one below, similar. CAMBRIDGESHIRE...
  5. P

    North East England

    Hi Deb, The closest I can find is a female black and white warbler which I appreciate is rarely seen here in England. I've posted a couple of links for comparison because I saw these birds at say 30 to 40 metres so in terms of what I saw it would be what they look like at that distance. The...
  6. P

    North East England

    Thanks, Mark. I didn't see any yellow on the breast. I saw mottled on the upper part and white below that (if that helps).
  7. P

    North East England

    Hi Deb, 'Useful information. What I would say here, however, is that I had a good, long look at both the bird I think was a shore lark and the two black and white birds. There are countless times where I've felt I just haven't had a good enough, long enough or close enough look to make it even...
  8. P

    North East England

    Hi Mark, I would be interested in any alternatives which was part of my original post. I wasn't fully sure because I didn't see the black band at the top of the breast, although part of the front was obscured by small branches. 'Definitely not a yellowhammer by the way.
  9. P

    North East England

    No, definitely not. As I say, these two birds turned front on after a while and had distinctive white stripes in the middle of their heads.
  10. P

    North East England

    Undoubtedly not, Deb. If it helps for a bit of background, I was stood to the left of a tree on the top of the valley trying to get a bit of cover and I saw them fly in and for a while they were lost in the thickets and then they came out into an opening in the trees (but still among the trees)...
  11. P

    North East England

    The other thing that just crossed my mind: when I say 'crown' it was a white stripe going all the way to the front of the head, not the sort of white patch on the back of the head of a coal tit. No apology necessary. I may try sketching something out tomorrow but it's a bit late now. I had a...
  12. P

    North East England

    Thanks for the welcome, Deb. Bird of prey: it was pretty close for about 10 seconds, a lot closer than I've ever been to a bird of prey. The habitat is pretty unusual for 'round here I think, with some beautiful colours on the trees and dense thickets. It's right by the coast/cliffs with a few...
  13. P

    North East England

    Hi Deb, Thanks for the reply. Shorelark: striking yellow stripes on the head, mottled on the breast, white underneath that, brown on the back. About the right size, I'd say around 18cm. Bird of prey: I wouldn't dispute that. As I say, I'm not that interested in the bigger birds so my...
  14. P

    North East England

    Hi all, I wonder if anyone could help me out with a few sightings this weekend gone. To put the following in some context, I'm not an experienced bird watcher but I have around 6 months (regular) knowledge/experience so I can tell the more common birds apart with ease. The reason I say that is...
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