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ZEISS DTI thermal imaging cameras. For more discoveries at night, and during the day.

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    Red-eared sliders are opportunistic predatory omnivores rather than herbivores

    I suspect that they were feral turtles released by man? In such a poor pond, the ducklings were much easier pickings than the more maneuverable mosquitofish. And the carp and ducks would be major competitors for insects, crustaceans, snails, and tadpoles. Aquatic vegetation is extremely...
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    Any suggestions on keeping weasels safe from cats and dogs in our yard?

    I agree. Why in the world would you get into legal trouble and give your neighbors no reason to respect you when you could use the law to your advantage? If you don't want cats that aren't yours on your property, then tell the neighbors that they need to confine their cats! I wouldn't even call...
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    Any suggestions on keeping weasels safe from cats and dogs in our yard?

    The weasel has probably gone off to hunt more mice by now. They usually hunt for food every few hours in the winter. They will certainly eat cat food (especially wet) when starving, but as long as the weasel isn't trapped, it will probably prefer to search for more mice and meadow voles...
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    Red-eared sliders are opportunistic predatory omnivores rather than herbivores

    Was aquatic vegetation abundant at that site? I always try to note if voracity in red-eared sliders might be attributable to a lack of vegetation and other pond life. I also believe that domestic and feral red-eared sliders may be more aggressive than undisturbed wild individuals, especially in...
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    Red-eared sliders are opportunistic predatory omnivores rather than herbivores

    Red-eared sliders don't prey on ducklings frequently enough to impact populations most of the time, but where they are common they may take their share. They are generally herbivorous. But if snapping turtles are scarce, red-eared sliders possibly might predate them with even more frequency...
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    Can we promote groundhog habitat on a small suburban lot? Will the groundhogs come back?

    Hello, folks! Since it's Groundhog Day today (at least here in the US), I was wondering if anyone might have advice about something that regards them. When we first moved here, there was a groundhog hibernating in a burrow a close distance to our house. The first year that we lived here, she...
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    Terrapins Uk, Should they stay?

    And since red-eared sliders originate outside of Europe, they probably carry nonnative microorganisms anyway.
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    Terrapins Uk, Should they stay?

    Red-eared sliders rarely even bother to chase goldfish in backyard ponds, so they are unlikely to even attempt to catch fish in something like a river (preferring to pick off the sluggish, the sick, and the dead or dying). I might see them competing with carp for food resources, though.
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    Terrapins Uk, Should they stay?

    I'm open to correction, but any observation of a red-eared slider feeding on bird eggs would be previously unknown to science, so obviously not a common occurrence by any means. A wild red-eared slider foraging on land would also be a first. If the egg was in the water, then the turtle may not...
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    Terrapins Uk, Should they stay?

    I understand that this post is very old. But some of the things that people say about red-eared sliders are ridiculous. Trachemys turtles may eat an occasional duckling, but they are by no means a threat to waterfowl populations. Red-eared sliders are opportunistic, and in proportion to their...
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    Any personal observations concerning attracting indigo buntings to backyards? What are they drawn to?

    That's a nice offer, but although I'd love to see indigo buntings anywhere in the wild, I'd say I'm somewhat more interested in attracting them to our town by offering them favorable habitat and food sources. We live in northern New Hampshire, and we are actually closer to the Canadian border...
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    Any personal observations concerning attracting indigo buntings to backyards? What are they drawn to?

    It is a decent habitat for bluebirds, but it isn't our property. Our property is somewhat small, and predominantly open woodland or edge habitat. Our lawn is disturbed quite a bit by us, our dogs, and cats (not ours). If we were to put up bluebird houses, I'd only imagine house wrens or invasive...
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    Any personal observations concerning attracting indigo buntings to backyards? What are they drawn to?

    Our town is somewhat suburban, but also offers a reasonable percentage of what I would describe as "agricultural land, shrubby fields, and scarce trees" behind our property. Since we moved from Connecticut to New Hampshire, our new property offers much more open meadow habitat, and cannot be...
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    Any suggestions on keeping weasels safe from cats and dogs in our yard?

    That suggestion was for me. The pipes are supposed to be protection from cats, dogs, and foxes, not martens. There is a difference between squeezing through a gap and running through a tunnel or burrow. A 2" pipe should stop most martens. Weasels are much better adapted to running through...
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    Any personal observations concerning attracting indigo buntings to backyards? What are they drawn to?

    Hello, folks! Growing up in New England, I must admit that I've seen a lot of birds in my lifetime. However, I can't say I've seen every bird common to our area. And one bird I've never seen, not even once, is the indigo bunting. And I'm still not sure why that is so. Compared to other...
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    Any suggestions on keeping weasels safe from cats and dogs in our yard?

    The concept of the small mammal camera trap shelter for our backyard is more complex than that. Ideally, it should resemble something similar to a "hedgehog house." (These are not my pictures.) https://i.pinimg.com/originals/35/75/87/357587daeaec9f71bf413fe2f12f833d.jpg...
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    Is it feasible to offer to be a release site for rehabilitated Carolina wrens on a small property?

    Well, we do have some free-roaming cats in our town. None of them are my cats, though, and whether they are feral or owned is a mystery to me, except for the one that wears a collar. I sure hope they aren't bothering our backyard birds, but although I haven't seen them kill any birds in our...
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    Is it feasible to offer to be a release site for rehabilitated Carolina wrens on a small property?

    Thanks! We planted a crabapple tree, a dogwood shrub, a chokeberry shrub, and evergreens. We also built brush piles in the wooded area. Bird feeders, birdbaths, and bird houses offer almost all the food, water, and cover that a breeding pair of Carolina wrens would need to thrive in our...
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    Any suggestions on keeping weasels safe from cats and dogs in our yard?

    I hate how dogs are restricted but cats are allowed to roam anywhere. I don't believe that all cats should be deprived of outdoor activities, but "catios" and cat-proof fences should be built in those cases. I appreciate the efforts of TNR, and feral cats don't bother me as much as the...
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    Any suggestions on keeping weasels safe from cats and dogs in our yard?

    Weasels are often more abundant than they appear. I've only ever seen tracks, but one of my dad's coworkers saw and trapped one in a supermarket. They are almost impossible to capture on camera. They move too fast to set off motion sensors, and spend too much time under the cover of debris...
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    Any suggestions on keeping weasels safe from cats and dogs in our yard?

    Fortunately, no more evidence of bird casualties were noticed or made obvious. The sparrow, which was found dead near our window, may have been killed by a collision rather than a cat in our backyard. But I did see a cat, a domestic cat, carrying a dead junco in our neighborhood. They've also...
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    Is it feasible to offer to be a release site for rehabilitated Carolina wrens on a small property?

    Hello, folks! I've been planning on preparing suitable habitat for small wildlife in our backyard for quite some time at this point. In particular, I've been trying to attract Carolina wrens. These small birds are common in much of New England. As a species, they seem to have adapted to...
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    Red-eared sliders are opportunistic predatory omnivores rather than herbivores

    It is possible that the carnivorous tendencies of adult red-eared sliders depends on their digestive bacteria. Apparently, one of the reasons that immature or juvenile red-eared sliders are predatory omnivores is because they don't have the gut microflora needed to digest plants and algae...
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    Has anyone else experienced eastern gray squirrels that are shy, timid, or otherwise not interested in bird food?

    To feed chipmunks without arousing bears in the spring/summer, we try to put out tiny servings of seed that they can nibble on without the bears noticing. Bears are attracted to feeders full of seed, but tiny chipmunk-sized servings are unlikely to draw a bear from long distances.
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    Has anyone else experienced eastern gray squirrels that are shy, timid, or otherwise not interested in bird food?

    I saw a single red squirrel guard a bird feeder table from gray squirrels last fall. The gray squirrels clearly did not consider fighting to be an option. The relentless red squirrel didn't only chase off the other squirrels when it was at the feeder. It would watch the feeder from all the way...
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