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ZEISS DTI thermal imaging cameras. For more discoveries at night, and during the day.

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  1. M

    What determines the field of view for the same magnification and objective lens?

    Stars look pretty much the same irrespective of orientation, and you quickly realize that it is pretty much irrelevant. It can become a challenge when locating an object, using paper charts. Inverted and/or reversed charts are available, or can be generated, but it can still be a nuisance...
  2. M

    What determines the field of view for the same magnification and objective lens?

    The Fujinon 16X70 is designed for folks with short noses. My beak, combined with close-set eyes, proved to be quite a challenge. I ended up going it to my daughter and son-in-law, whose IPD may be greater. It was quite remarkable for astronomy.
  3. M

    What determines the field of view for the same magnification and objective lens?

    Okay, let me rephrase. What is the answer to OP’s question if the manufacturer has not installed a field stop in the focal plane of the eyepiece? We can assume that the physical diameter of the optical tube limits the field of view, and I would guess that OP is aware of that limitation.
  4. M

    What determines the field of view for the same magnification and objective lens?

    What is the answer to OP’s question if we remove the field stop?
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