Join for FREE
It only takes a minute!
Zeiss - Always on the lookout for something special – Shop now

Welcome to BirdForum.
BirdForum is the net's largest birding community, dedicated to wild birds and birding, and is absolutely FREE! You are most welcome to register for an account, which allows you to take part in lively discussions in the forum, post your pictures in the gallery and more.

HMW Handbook of the Mammals of the World

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rating: Thread Rating: 20 votes, 4.80 average.
Old Tuesday 16th April 2019, 03:37   #501
sicklebill
Registered User

 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Queensland
Posts: 821
Sorry, I'd assumed it was a book forum but I should have started a new thread
sicklebill is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Wednesday 24th April 2019, 08:34   #502
KevinWells
Registered User

 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Geelong Australia
Posts: 27
HMW vol 9 pre-publication program is to begin on May 15.
KevinWells is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Wednesday 24th April 2019, 16:47   #503
andyadcock
Registered User
 
andyadcock's Avatar

 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Nottingham UK and St Petersburg, Russia
Posts: 14,297
Quote:
Originally Posted by KevinWells View Post
HMW vol 9 pre-publication program is to begin on May 15.
What does that actually mean Kevin?
__________________
Andy A
andyadcock is online now  
Reply With Quote
Old Wednesday 24th April 2019, 21:23   #504
KevinWells
Registered User

 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Geelong Australia
Posts: 27
Hi Andy,
It means that those that have a standing order with Lynx will have their credit card debited with the the cost of the volume. There is a 20% discount applied to the cost until publication date, the cost is 125Euros not 160Euros as it will be after publication. Postage is free. Orders can be made directly through Lynx website by anyone who wants to do so.

Last edited by KevinWells : Wednesday 24th April 2019 at 22:12.
KevinWells is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Wednesday 24th April 2019, 23:08   #505
Melanie
Registered User

 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Kassel, Germany
Posts: 2,733
The pre-publication offer for 125€ has already started on 12 April 2019 (at least at NHBS).

https://www.nhbs.com/handbook-of-the...eid=a95fdefca3

Last edited by Melanie : Wednesday 24th April 2019 at 23:11.
Melanie is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Thursday 25th April 2019, 08:09   #506
andyadcock
Registered User
 
andyadcock's Avatar

 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Nottingham UK and St Petersburg, Russia
Posts: 14,297
Quote:
Originally Posted by Melanie View Post
The pre-publication offer for 125€ has already started on 12 April 2019 (at least at NHBS).

https://www.nhbs.com/handbook-of-the...eid=a95fdefca3
And at my regular supplier in fact, it's a long standing arrangement.
__________________
Andy A
andyadcock is online now  
Reply With Quote
Old Thursday 16th May 2019, 06:50   #507
KevinWells
Registered User

 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Geelong Australia
Posts: 27
Sample plates and photos are now on the Lynx website for HMW9
KevinWells is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Thursday 16th May 2019, 08:04   #508
andyadcock
Registered User
 
andyadcock's Avatar

 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Nottingham UK and St Petersburg, Russia
Posts: 14,297
The plates look great however, with so many small rodents and bats, only safely identified through an in hand examination of dentition, I''d have thought that this should have been included too.

As a ''handbook', I can''t help thinking it's a little incomplete without, I assume that such information is available somewhere for most species? I''ve watched at least one nature programme where an expert seemed to be checking some kind of table as she tried to identify a bat in the hand.
__________________
Andy A

Last edited by andyadcock : Thursday 16th May 2019 at 08:16.
andyadcock is online now  
Reply With Quote
Old Thursday 16th May 2019, 08:12   #509
Melanie
Registered User

 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Kassel, Germany
Posts: 2,733
I am curious if they will include the extinct Chrstmas Island pipistrelle.
Melanie is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Thursday 16th May 2019, 08:33   #510
KevinWells
Registered User

 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Geelong Australia
Posts: 27
They have included the Greater New Zealand Short tailed bat, noting that it has not been seen since the 1960s, so perhaps the extinct Christmas Island bat may be included
KevinWells is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Thursday 16th May 2019, 14:09   #511
Swissboy
Registered User
BF Supporter 2019
 
Swissboy's Avatar

 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Sempach, Switzerland
Posts: 3,586
Quote:
Originally Posted by KevinWells View Post
Sample plates and photos are now on the Lynx website for HMW9
Thanks! Another great volume, and despite the multiple authorship of the plates, there seems to be a very high standard throughout.

I'm already curious to learn more about those white bats.
__________________
Robert
--PS: That's a Sooty Falcon on the avatar, photo taken near Sharm el Sheik, Egypt. My highest priority raptor at the time.
What's your species on the avatar? I often have no clue
!
Swissboy is offline  
Reply With Quote

BF Supporter 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 Support BirdForum With A Donation

Old Friday 17th May 2019, 07:39   #512
andyadcock
Registered User
 
andyadcock's Avatar

 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Nottingham UK and St Petersburg, Russia
Posts: 14,297
Quote:
Originally Posted by Swissboy View Post
Thanks! Another great volume, and despite the multiple authorship of the plates, there seems to be a very high standard throughout.

I'm already curious to learn more about those white bats.
I saw this tiny species of tent making Bat, in Costa Rica, Honduran White Bat Ectophylla alba. You can see in this image, where the Bats have nibbled the centre of the leave to effect the fold which makes their 'tent'.

Apparently, if monkeys find them, they just dash in and clap the leaves together to kill then eat the bats.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	20170414104853088.jpg
Views:	28
Size:	51.9 KB
ID:	695336  
__________________
Andy A

Last edited by andyadcock : Friday 17th May 2019 at 07:41.
andyadcock is online now  
Reply With Quote
Old Friday 17th May 2019, 07:43   #513
fugl
Registered User
BF Supporter 2019

 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Portland, Oregon
Posts: 14,846
Quote:
Originally Posted by andyadcock View Post
I saw this tiny species of tent making Bat, in Costa Rica, Honduran White Bat Ectophylla alba. You can see in this image, where the Bats have nibbled the centre of the leave to effect the fold which maked thir 'tent'.

Apparently, if monkeys find them, they just dash in and clap the leaves together to kill then eat the bats.
Remarkable. . ..
__________________
Bird photos (Flickr): http://www.flickr.com/photos/fugl/
". . .Let them be left, O let them be left, wildness and wet;
Long live the weeds and the wilderness yet."

--Gerard Manley Hopkins
fugl is offline  
Reply With Quote

BF Supporter 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 Support BirdForum With A Donation

Old Friday 17th May 2019, 08:11   #514
Melanie
Registered User

 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Kassel, Germany
Posts: 2,733
I am really looking forward to HMW9. Chiropterology and bat photography are very amazing and thrilling things. By the way one of the great scientists of the Neotropical chiropterology, Robert James Baker, died last year. But among the authors of the HMW9 volume there are some other great chiropterologists, like Ara Monadjem, Steven M. Goodman, or Manuel Ruedi.

Last edited by Melanie : Friday 17th May 2019 at 13:32. Reason: correct name
Melanie is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Tuesday 21st May 2019, 00:23   #515
Dave Boyle
Registered User

 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Skomer
Posts: 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Melanie View Post
I am curious if they will include the extinct Chrstmas Island pipistrelle.
I was lucky enough to see the last five Christmas Island Pipistrelles in January 2009 - just happened to be staying in the same place as a couple of bat workers who were investigating bringing them in to captivity & they took us out one night & we saw them all emerge from their roost & go off foraging.

And in one of those weird coincidences, I used to work for Brian Bell, who was one of the last people to see Greater Short-tailed Bat on Big South Cape in the '60s
Dave Boyle is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Tuesday 21st May 2019, 08:41   #516
andyadcock
Registered User
 
andyadcock's Avatar

 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Nottingham UK and St Petersburg, Russia
Posts: 14,297
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave Boyle View Post
I was lucky enough to see the last five Christmas Island Pipistrelles in January 2009 - just happened to be staying in the same place as a couple of bat workers who were investigating bringing them in to captivity & they took us out one night & we saw them all emerge from their roost & go off foraging.

And in one of those weird coincidences, I used to work for Brian Bell, who was one of the last people to see Greater Short-tailed Bat on Big South Cape in the '60s
Why did they become extinct Dave?
__________________
Andy A

Last edited by andyadcock : Tuesday 21st May 2019 at 12:05.
andyadcock is online now  
Reply With Quote
Old Tuesday 21st May 2019, 11:12   #517
Melanie
Registered User

 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Kassel, Germany
Posts: 2,733
Quote:
Originally Posted by andyadcock View Post
Why id they become extinct Dave?
John Woinarski published a book last year titled A Bat's End where he is trying to answer this question. There are several reasons for the extinction of the pipistrelle. One might be the very aggressive Crazy Yellow Ant which is the largest danger for the fauna of Chrstmas Island. These ants were responsible for the extinction of the Christmas Island shrew (by the way included in HMW 8) and for the demise of the Christmas Island red crab.

Last edited by Melanie : Tuesday 21st May 2019 at 11:16.
Melanie is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Tuesday 21st May 2019, 12:05   #518
andyadcock
Registered User
 
andyadcock's Avatar

 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Nottingham UK and St Petersburg, Russia
Posts: 14,297
Quote:
Originally Posted by Melanie View Post
John Woinarski published a book last year titled A Bat's End where he is trying to answer this question. There are several reasons for the extinction of the pipistrelle. One might be the very aggressive Crazy Yellow Ant which is the largest danger for the fauna of Chrstmas Island. These ants were responsible for the extinction of the Christmas Island shrew (by the way included in HMW 8) and for the demise of the Christmas Island red crab.
So a natural event?
__________________
Andy A
andyadcock is online now  
Reply With Quote
Old Tuesday 21st May 2019, 12:12   #519
Melanie
Registered User

 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Kassel, Germany
Posts: 2,733
Quote:
Originally Posted by andyadcock View Post
So a natural event?
No, a catastrophic invasion. The Yellow crazy ant (originally from the Maldives in the Indian Ocean) was accidentally introduced to Christmas Island in the 1980s
Melanie is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Tuesday 21st May 2019, 14:26   #520
andyadcock
Registered User
 
andyadcock's Avatar

 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Nottingham UK and St Petersburg, Russia
Posts: 14,297
Quote:
Originally Posted by Melanie View Post
No, a catastrophic invasion. The Yellow crazy ant (originally from the Maldives in the Indian Ocean) was accidentally introduced to Christmas Island in the 1980s
Ah, ok, thank you.
__________________
Andy A
andyadcock is online now  
Reply With Quote
Old Wednesday 22nd May 2019, 08:19   #521
Dave Boyle
Registered User

 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Skomer
Posts: 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by andyadcock View Post
Why did they become extinct Dave?
At the time people weren't too sure - the timing apparently didn't really fit the arrival of the ants but nobody had a better theory. The bats were still common until mid-80's then just vanished.

The Shrew is even more fascinating - it was thought to be extinct by the start of the 20th Century then storms in the mid 80's brought down some of the huge trees Abbott's Boobies breed in & two had shrews in them - so then people started looking high in the trees and none have ever been found since!
Dave Boyle is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Wednesday 22nd May 2019, 09:25   #522
andyadcock
Registered User
 
andyadcock's Avatar

 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Nottingham UK and St Petersburg, Russia
Posts: 14,297
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave Boyle View Post
At the time people weren't too sure - the timing apparently didn't really fit the arrival of the ants but nobody had a better theory. The bats were still common until mid-80's then just vanished.

The Shrew is even more fascinating - it was thought to be extinct by the start of the 20th Century then storms in the mid 80's brought down some of the huge trees Abbott's Boobies breed in & two had shrews in them - so then people started looking high in the trees and none have ever been found since!
Fascinating, shouldn't they have been classsified as Tree Shrews?
__________________
Andy A
andyadcock is online now  
Reply With Quote
Old Thursday 23rd May 2019, 06:43   #523
KevinWells
Registered User

 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Geelong Australia
Posts: 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by andyadcock View Post
Fascinating, shouldn't they have been classsified as Tree Shrews?
Come on Andy, time to apologise.
( I did chuckle though.)
KevinWells is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Thursday 23rd May 2019, 08:15   #524
andyadcock
Registered User
 
andyadcock's Avatar

 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Nottingham UK and St Petersburg, Russia
Posts: 14,297
Quote:
Originally Posted by KevinWells View Post
Come on Andy, time to apologise.
( I did chuckle though.)
On second read through, were the Shrews in the tees or the Boobies?
__________________
Andy A
andyadcock is online now  
Reply With Quote
Advertisement
Reply


Thread Tools
Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Handbook of the birds of the world volume 11 Papuan birder Books, Magazines, Publications, Video & DVD 11 Tuesday 15th September 2015 11:35
Handbook of the Birds of the World stuartelsom Books, Magazines, Publications, Video & DVD 0 Thursday 26th January 2006 18:56

{googleads}

Fatbirder's Top 1000 Birding Websites

Help support BirdForum

Page generated in 0.25503898 seconds with 39 queries
All times are GMT. The time now is 14:17.