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Coopmans’s Elaenia

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Old Saturday 18th August 2018, 10:21   #1
Calalp
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Coopmans’s Elaenia

Still struggling with my MS text on Paul Coopmans (who died in 2007) and "his" birds ...

So here´s a short question, on the English Common name of Coopmans’s Elaenia Elaenia brachyptera VON BERLEPSCH 1907 (1905?), here (Note: the OD is, naturally, of no importance, for the English Common name ... coined more than a century later)

Does anyone know if Paul Coopmans ever heard/found "his" Elaenia, Elaenia brachyptera, in the Field, in Eastern Ecuador or if he "only" noted is as "vocally distinct" from he recordings of Rheindt and his colleauges ... [like indoors, at the end of his (much too short) life] ... I cannot tell either way, from the Paper, Rheindt et al, 2015*, that caused the "split" ...

Or to re-phrase it: Was it Coopmans personally who established the fact that brachyptera was present on the Ecuadorian (Eastern) side of the Andes contra/versus/like the same bird/taxon found by von Berlepsch, on the opposite side of the Andes, in Southern West Colombia?

Did More et al. Bird Sounds of Ecuador (DVD-ROM, 2013) tell us anything either way?

Grateful for all the help I can get (... on this one as well)!

Björn

PS: Not to confuse with the Foothill Elaenia Myiopagis olallai COOPMANS & KRABBE 2000 (earlier, in 2015/2016 a k a "Coopmanselenia" in Swedish; today gråhuvad elenia, meaning "Grey-headed Elaenia") – a species that Coopmans was even far deeper involved with! That one he heard in 1991, recorded in -92, caught in -94 and described in 2000 (the latter two events together with Niels Krabbe) nor with the subspecies Myiopagis olallai coopmansi CUERVO et al 2014!

And please, please; keep Coopmans's Tyrannulet Zimmerius minimus CHAPMAN 1912 out of this thread. The case of Coopmans and "his birds are already complicated enough. The fact that all of them, all four, are included in Tyrannidae, and that they are all equally, respecitvely hard to recognise (by eye) doesn´t make them easier to keep apart.
__________________________________________________ _______
*Rheindt, F. E., N. Krabbe, A. K. S. Wee & L. Christidis. 2015. Cryptic speciation in the Lesser Elaenia Elaenia chiriquensis (Aves: Passeriformes: Tyrannidae). Zootaxa 4032: 251-263 (here)

Last edited by Calalp : Sunday 19th August 2018 at 08:56.
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Old Sunday 19th August 2018, 08:28   #2
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Ouups! I just found a News paper cut/clip ...

Compare today's HBW Alive Key entry below:
Quote:
coopmansi
Paul Coopmans (1967-2007) Belgian field-ornithologist, tour-leader, expert on Neotropical birds (subsp. Myiopagis olallai).
... with what's written here and/or here (in Dutch).

Born in 1967 or 1962 ... ?!?

Björn

PS. To me the latter seems more likely, as he finished his (University) studies in 1984.
I always thought of him as an unusually young graduate ...
--

Last edited by Calalp : Sunday 19th August 2018 at 08:50. Reason: PS
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Old Sunday 19th August 2018, 09:04   #3
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Anyone of our Dutch friends feel like translating it?

Or at least the beginning of it .. ?
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Old Sunday 19th August 2018, 16:44   #4
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Either way, don't forget the OD of the (Foothill) Elaenia subspecies Myiopagis olallai coopmansi, CUERVO et al 2014:
Quote:
Etymology. The epithet honors the late Paul Coopmans (1967–2007) in recognition of his ...
... recently dealt with in the thread Owls (sic), see post #84, in the Bird Taxonomy and Nomenclature Forum (here).

I simply don´t know what to believe ... !?!

1967 or 1962 or 1967 or ...

---

Last edited by Calalp : Sunday 19th August 2018 at 16:51. Reason: added link
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Old Sunday 19th August 2018, 20:32   #5
l_raty
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I vote 1962.
(The dates in the Key are presumably taken from the OD, in which case the two sources should be regarded as one and the same. I know first-hand that he had already moved to Quito in 1988, and he was then certainly older than 21. And you simply don't complete a biology degree at 17...)
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Old Sunday 19th August 2018, 21:28   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Calalp View Post
Anyone of our Dutch friends feel like translating it?

Or at least the beginning of it .. ?
I ran it through a free online OCR, than through Google translate, and adjusted a few things. The result may not be perfect, but you should be able to understand most of it , I think.
Quote:
Paul Coopmans
(1962 – 2007)


A year ago, we suddenly had to say goodbye to Paul Coopmans, member of Natuurpunt, but to the vast majority of our members an unknown. As a token of appreciation for his groundbreaking pioneering work, we have chosen to remember this sad birthday with the following contribution in gratitude.

Paul was born on June 7, 1962 and spent his childhood in the woods, heath and dunes of Snepkenshof in Lichtaart, near Snepkensvijver. His love for nature was already ingrained from next to the front door and it was therefore no surprise that Paul, gifted and quick to grasp, studied biology in Antwerp, studies that he completed in 1984 with a thesis about the great tit. He decided to take environmental remediation in Ghent for another year and came into contact with fellows who, like himself, wanted to spread their wings to get to know the wide world.
Through the years, Paul was, among other things, fascinated by Charles Darwin's theory of evolution. In 1985 he got the chance of his life! Ecotourism was already on the rise and Ecuador was eagerly looking for Spanish-speaking biologists who could accompany nature lovers on cruise ships on and around the Galápagos Islands. He bought an assimil booklet of Spanish and was able in no time to manage verbally. Out of some 100 candidates, 5 were selected ... Paul was among them! For two years he acted there as a gladly seen guide. He continued his explorations after '86 in the Amazon basin of eastern Ecuador and eventually settled in the capital Quito in the late 1980s.

Paul was an avid autodidact; he was constantly learning from books, magazines and field guides and gradually his knowledge of the South American birds grew to proportions that gave hime a growing reputation in specialized circles. In his study room you literally stumbled over the literature (he also owned a duplicate of almost everything), but Paul knew where everything was. He began to focus hard on the study of bird sounds, especially when he was able to use very sophisticated recording equipment from '89, which he had received from the renowned Comell Laboratory of Ornithology in New York. Some travel agencies had not failed to notice. For a while Paul guided bird trips for Victor Emmanuel (USA), but around 1990 he finally chose Birdquest (UK).

In the following 15 years, Paul guided more than 70 nature and bird travels, the majority in South American countries. His phenomenal gift for learning to listen to what he wanted to distinguish in the 'cacophony of the singing rainforest', even from a great distance, became gradually legendary. He was known as an optimist who wandered from morning to night for his traveling companions and, as an ambience bringer, he used a fine and dry sense of humor that immediately charmed everyone.

It could not last long ... Strong suspicions arose in June 1992 and 2 years later they resulted in the formal confirmation: Paul had discovered a new bird species, a kind of Tyrant flycatcher! He also provided a fundamental contribution to the completion of the two-part reference work The Birds of Ecuador by Ridgeley and Greenfield, in which he took care of all sound descriptions, and realized with John V. Moore Nature Recordings an impressive series of CD's bird sounds from Ecuador, a titanic work at which he worked with his team for 10 years. The original recordings - recently deposited in the Macauly Library of Natural Sounds in New York - include more than 300 hours of recording!
Paul continued to amaze ... not published yet are his suggestions to review the status of a whole range of species and subspecies. There is still a lot of homework waiting for science (including DNA research); votes already went on to give Paul's name to a possible new species that would be discovered under his impulse.
Through his publications and travel guidance he also indirectly denounced the needs and threats of the rainforest, in so far as he was personally involved in the purchase of whole pieces of valuable jungle in recent years.

As a staff leader at Birdquest, he was fortunately still able to attend the 25th anniversary of this organization in March 2006 in Tanzania. Then fate struck ...
Paul died in Herentals on the night of January 1-2, 2007 after a long, lingering illness that he suffered courageously. Until the last few weeks he was still eager to check his mails ... typically Paul! During the farewell in the St. Waldetrudis Church in Herentals on January 6, we all listened to the long speeches of his colleague Mark Van Beirs and Birdquest chairman Mark Beamon. Not only Paul's cordiality and professionalism were clearly in the forefront of each argument, as were the sometimes funny anecdotes during adventurous tours.
As one of the best bird experts in South America, he leaves a huge void in the international community that deals with ornithology at the highest level. At 44, he could still have realized so many ambitious plans... His name, as an ornithologist with world renown from his own ranks, will still often be quoted... inextricably linked to his beloved home base, the rainforests of the Andes.

The thoughts of our local residents at Snepkenshof still go to his wife Syama and his two sons, Nicolas and Diego, who with this so painful loss still have to take up the thread in their lives. He was so conscientious in his job, so devoted he was also as a husband and father. To them in Ecuador and to his mother Chris and brother Bert at Snepkenshof we want to continue to wish, also on behalf of the local department, much strength. - LM

Last edited by l_raty : Monday 20th August 2018 at 11:07.
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Old Sunday 19th August 2018, 21:35   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by l_raty View Post
I vote 1962.
snipAnd you simply don't complete a biology degree at 17...)
There are people who finish a bachelor level degree at that age, but not a PhD to the best of my knowledge.

Niels
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Old Sunday 19th August 2018, 21:55   #8
l_raty
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Quote:
Originally Posted by njlarsen View Post
There are people who finish a bachelor level degree at that age, but not a PhD to the best of my knowledge.
It was not a PhD. "Bachelor-level degrees" didn't exist in Belgium at that time. Biology was a four-year cursus (2 years of "candidatures", followed by 2 years of "licences"), to be attended after you had finished college ("secondary school"), which only very few people did before being 18, and almost nobody before being 17.

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Old Monday 20th August 2018, 08:02   #9
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Thanks Laurent! For yet another major translation ...

The reason why I hesitated is that it´s guite rare to find specific years (a life span) for the ones commemorated, mentioned in an OD, thereby I assumed Cuervo et al (2014) had to know, when they decided to include it. I guess they simply got it wrong.

With all this (particularly with the details of his childhood in Snepkenshof and studies in Antwerp) I will go for 1962.

Once again: thanks!

Björn

PS. James have already updated his/the HBW (very) Alive Key:
Quote:
coopmansi
Paul Coopmans (1962-2007) Belgian field-ornithologist, tour-leader, expert on Neotropical birds (subsp. Myiopagis olallai).
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Old Monday 20th August 2018, 08:28   #10
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Does anyone have any idea on how to refer to that particular piece/cutting/clipping, in a List of References ... ?

L. M. (?). Editorial material (?). 20XX (?). Paul Coopmans (1962 – 2007). De Postiljon (wekelijks informatieblad), published, when, where ?

/B
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Old Monday 20th August 2018, 09:31   #11
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From the content and the date of the blog post, this must have been published in an early issue of 2008.
The journal (website [here]) is issued weekly on Thursdays, and is currently in its 38th year.
If this was already so back then, that would give: De Postiljon (wekelijks informatieblad), 28 (1, 2 or 3); 3, 10 or 17 Jan 2008. Published in Lichtaart, Belgium.

You might try to ask them for more details, there is a 'Contact' page on the website. (Select 'De Postiljon' in the 'Vraag voor:' field.)
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Old Monday 20th August 2018, 10:16   #12
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Thanks again Laurent!

I have sent them a 'Vraag voor', hopefully they will reply ...

We´ll see.
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Old Monday 20th August 2018, 14:11   #13
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Probably redundant by now, but just want to confirm that Paul indeed was born in 1962...
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Old Monday 20th August 2018, 15:47   #14
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Thanks Peter!

Björn

PS. Do you as well (as you knew Paul Coopmans) maybe also know the answer to my first question in Post #1?


---

Last edited by Calalp : Monday 20th August 2018 at 17:04. Reason: PS.
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Old Tuesday 21st August 2018, 11:58   #15
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Even if no-one seems to know the answer to my initial question in post #1, regarding if Coopmans first heard "his" Elaenia brachyptera in the Field, or only as recorded, indoors ... however, it´s of no major concern, even if I would like to know it (if not answered I can always write my way around it) ...

Eiter way; here´s another short question, maybe far easier to answer (if you´re fluent in English):

Rheint et al (2015) writes (on p.259):
Quote:
The “rattle” call of brachyptera ... was distinctly different from calls of all other taxa in the genus examined and was the vocalization that led the late Paul Coopmans (pers. comm.) to suggest that brachyptera should be elevated to species rank even before its distinctive dawn song was recorded.
I get the hang of it, in general, but hesitate on one single thing; the term "dawn song". Is it as simple as the song sung at Dawn (prior to/at Sunset) or is it an English term for yet another song/call?

The reason for my hesitation is that we in Sweden have a term, skuggsång (which would be "Shadow Song" in English), and the latter is a different song all together, that can be heard at noon, mid-day, or when-ever, from dusk to dawn, even off-season ... (it´s more like a trial/learning/rehearsal song, different from the fully developed mating/attracting/warning Song, of late evenings, or mornings, in Spring and Summer).

A detail, yes, but it would help to understand the meaning of "dawn song" ...

Anyone?

/B
_

Last edited by Calalp : Tuesday 21st August 2018 at 13:16. Reason: typo
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Old Tuesday 21st August 2018, 15:21   #16
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Not a native but it is my impression that the dawn song is usually given at that time of the day and usually is the most distinctive song given by several tropical species. I personally would not exclude the possibility of hearing it at other times of the day but I would not expect to hear it at other times.

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Old Tuesday 21st August 2018, 15:47   #17
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Thanks, Niels, so there's no risk of confusing "dawn song" with skuggsång ... ?

By the way; is there such a/another English word for the latter?

Björn
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Old Thursday 23rd August 2018, 09:27   #18
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End post

No other replies/protests ...

Thereby (in my MS) I will keep "Dawn song" as equal of the Song sung at dawn.

Sometimes things are just as they appear to be. As simple as that.

Coopmans ... over and out!
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Old Friday 24th August 2018, 02:33   #19
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The Swedish word skuggsång I have seen translated as Subsong. Subsong describes a behavior where birds sing quietly.
http://earbirding.com/blog/archives/2910 .
Pretty sure dawn song is at dawn like the dawn chorus.
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Old Friday 24th August 2018, 08:17   #20
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Thanks Mark!

Thereby; my MS stays the same. Good.

/B
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Old Friday 24th August 2018, 14:09   #21
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One more ... (for anyone concerned).

Thanks to Jan Snauwaert, who´s in charge of answering any 'Vraag voor' regarding De Postiljon, at Drukkerij Baudoin, in Lichtaart, Belgium, we can now use the following citation, for the cutting/clipping (links in post #2, and/alt. its translation in #6) as:

Editorial material (”LM”) 2008. Paul Coopmans (1962–2007), De Postiljon (wekelijks informatieblad), No. 1/2 (January): p. 8.

They do not have any note on the exact Author of this text in their Archive. Not more than the "LM" above. The text was apparently received by e-mail ...

That´s it!

/B
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Old Thursday 17th January 2019, 02:29   #22
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Is anyone here who knows where this article is available?

Kirwan, G.M. & Freile, J.F., 2008. Current perspectives in Ecuadorian ornithology and conservation: a tribute to Paul Coopmans. Cotinga 29: 2–3
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Old Thursday 17th January 2019, 07:34   #23
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Have you already asked at the Neotropical Bird Club? Ideed pages 1-11 are missing here.
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Old Thursday 17th January 2019, 11:54   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Taphrospilus View Post
Have you already asked at the Neotropical Bird Club? Ideed pages 1-11 are missing here.

I only found the Krabbe paper on Coopmans so it seems that the pages 1 to 11 are not available in the internet. Maybe someone has the print edition of Cotinga 29 and could help me.
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