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Snake, Mishmi Hills, NE India

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Old Monday 13th May 2019, 19:39   #1
Xenospiza
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Snake, Mishmi Hills, NE India

Can anyone shed light on this one? I was thinking of an Amphiesma species, but (other than the family) I am likely wrong!
See also: https://observation.org/waarneming/view/172215558
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Old Wednesday 15th May 2019, 07:53   #2
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I wonder about Gunther's Keelback?

http://www.wildborneo.com.my/photo.p...=snake&p=5&i=9

https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/4841823

I'm a bit confused by the info I'm finding, the above says that it's endemic to Java and other small Islands in Indonesia but, 'Snakes and other reptiles of India' by Indraniel Das, states, 'A montane species of Keelback from NE India' and gives the scientific name Amphiesma khasiense.

It seems to be a poorly known species, perhaps try and find a local expert to take a look, maybe start here?

http://reptile-database.reptarium.cz/contactus
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Old Wednesday 15th May 2019, 13:59   #3
James Eaton
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It's a False Cobra, Pesudoxenedon macrops. It's a common species in Northeast India. Basically, a keelback and Semi-venomous - they haven't got real fangs, just little toxic saliva which can kill small prey.

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Old Wednesday 15th May 2019, 17:17   #4
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Yep, looks ok to me though this is the only image I can find that looks like it.

http://www.indiansnakes.org/sites/de...?itok=qbajDZZC
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Old Saturday 18th May 2019, 19:27   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by James Eaton View Post
It's a False Cobra, Pseudoxenedon macrops. It's a common species in Northeast India. Basically, a keelback and Semi-venomous - they haven't got real fangs, just little toxic saliva which can kill small prey.

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Thanks. I am happy it didn't do the cobra pose!
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Old Sunday 19th May 2019, 07:06   #6
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Originally Posted by Xenospiza View Post
Thanks. I am happy it didn't do the cobra pose!
The last time I was in Goa, I was on Baga Hill and watching a Golden Oriole. It was late in the birding season, early April and the monsoon was close, this is when snakes become active, ready to breed.

As I watched the Oriole, I heard a rustle in the leaf litter but thought as many times before, it would be a large bug or lizard going about it's business so didn't look down.

Finally, the Oriole flew off and I lowered my bins, I glanced down to my left and an erect Cobra was watching me from just three feet. I took a long, slow step away from it and it just lowered itself and went off.

I often wonder what may have happened if I'd tried to shift position to see the Oriole better and taken a step towards the snake, we'll never know but they aren't generally aggressive to people and will usually make off at the first chance.
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Old Sunday 19th May 2019, 07:12   #7
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Originally Posted by Xenospiza View Post
Thanks. I am happy it didn't do the cobra pose!
The last time I was in Goa, I was on Baga Hill and watching a Golden Oriole. It was late in the season, early April and the wet season was close, this is when snakes become active, ready to breed.

As I watched the Oriole, I heard a rustle in the leaf litter but thought as many times before, it would be a large bug or lizard going about it's business so didn't look down.

Finally, the Oriole flew off and I lowered my bins, I glanced down to my left and an erect Cobra was watching me from just three feet. I took a long, slow step away from it and it just lowered itself and went off.

I often wonder what may have happened if I'd tried to shift position to see the Oriole better and taken a step towards the snake, we'll never know but they aren't generally aggressive to people and will usually make off at the first chance.

Another encounter I had was with a c3m Reticulated Python. Sam Woods and I were coming down the hill at pace from the Whiskered Pitta site in the Phiippines. As I trudged, head down, a shape in the path instinctively triggered a halt response. Sam almost piled in to the back of me and asked what was wrong, I pointed to a large Python, sat squarely in the middle of the narrow track. The track was so narrow that we couldn't pass the snake without a real chance of being bitted so we decided to poke it with a stick in the hope it would move off.

This was a decent sized snake, it wasn't afraid of us at all and actually tried to bite me. Eventually, after a few minutes of us prodding it and it hissing and lunging at us, it begrudgingly moved in to the trackside vegetation and we were finally able to pass safely.

A picture of the actual Python is attached, you can see it's head is raised.
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