Join for FREE
It only takes a minute!
Magnifying the passion for nature. Zeiss Victory Harpia 95. New!

Welcome to BirdForum.
BirdForum is the net's largest birding community, dedicated to wild birds and birding, and is absolutely FREE! You are most welcome to register for an account, which allows you to take part in lively discussions in the forum, post your pictures in the gallery and more.

Hyphens

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rating: Thread Rating: 2 votes, 2.00 average.
Old Tuesday 20th February 2018, 08:05   #26
Jos Stratford
Beast from the East
 
Jos Stratford's Avatar

 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Exile in Eastern Europe
Posts: 15,740
Quote:
Originally Posted by Silverwolf View Post
Riddle me this: IOC lists "buttonquail". Then, it proceeds to list "stone-curlew". Why would stone-curlew not be stonecurlew, if buttonquail is without a hyphen?
Answer to your misery is in post 22 😃
__________________
For photographs and articles, Lithuania and beyond, click here for my website
Jos Stratford is offline  
Reply With Quote

BF Supporter 2007 2009 Support BirdForum With A Donation

Old Wednesday 21st February 2018, 14:24   #27
Kirk Roth
Registered User

 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Indianapolis
Posts: 233
Quote:
Originally Posted by Silverwolf View Post
Riddle me this: IOC lists "buttonquail". Then, it proceeds to list "stone-curlew". Why would stone-curlew not be stonecurlew, if buttonquail is without a hyphen?
From the IOC Website (http://www.worldbirdnames.org/englis...pound-names/):


Compound single words are used...
"IF the second word is a kind of bird (e.g., Nighthawk, Bushtit, Waterthrush, Meadowlark), but the taxon is not a member of the bird family named.

For example, a Meadowlark is not a Lark; a Cuckooshrike is not a Shrike. Thus the name should not be spelled as two words without a hyphen (e.g., Meadow Lark), or spelled with a hyphen followed by a capital letter (e.g., Cuckoo-Shrike). Rather, a single word is used except where it would be hard to pronounce or look odd (e.g., Silky-flycatcher, Stone-curlew, Flycatcher-shrike). Conversely, if the second word is a type of bird and the taxon is deemed to be a member of that bird family, the name would be spelled with two words, either without a hyphen or with a hyphen followed by a capital letter (e.g., Bush Lark, Eagle-Owl). Converting these to single words states, in effect, that the taxon is not in that family but is rather something different. Exceptions have been made in a few cases where long and widespread usage dictates a single word, such as Goldfinch, Skylark, Woodlark, and Sparrowhawk. These and other cases are under review for potential revision."
Kirk Roth is offline  
Reply With Quote
Advertisement
Reply


Thread Tools
Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Hyphens, again... Richard Klim Bird Taxonomy and Nomenclature 36 Wednesday 10th February 2016 14:22
Rock Thrushes: Hyphens again wintibird Opus Discussion Area 2 Thursday 23rd October 2008 19:42



Fatbirder's Top 1000 Birding Websites

Help support BirdForum

Page generated in 0.11774898 seconds with 14 queries
All times are GMT. The time now is 14:38.