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Mr. Hauxwell's birds

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Old Monday 29th April 2019, 14:54   #1
Calalp
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Mr. Hauxwell's birds

Here´s some minor additions (nothing major) on the obscure Mr. Hauxwell, commemorated in...

hauxwelli as in:
● Hauxwell's Thrush* Turdus hauxwelli LAWRENCE 1869 (here). Type collected by Hauxwell, at Pebas, [in today's Departemento Loreto], eastern Peru, 3rd October 1868
● Plain-throated Antwren (Isleria) Myrmotherula hauxwelli SCLATER 1857 (here) as "Formicivora hauxwelli", type collected at Chamicuros, by Hauxwell, in East Peru.
● the subspecies Mionectes oleagineus hauxwelli CHUBB 1919 (here) as "Pipromorpha oleaginea hauxwelli", collected "by the late J. Hauxwell", at Pebas, Peru in July 1886.
● the subspecies Henicorhina leucosticta hauxwelli CHUBB 1920 (here). Type collected by Hauxwell, at Elvira, at the Rio Marañon, east Peru, 9th of January 1877.

And some invalid ones:
● "Porzana hauxwelli" SCLATER & SALVIN 1869 (here) a k a Hauxwell's Crake. [Syn. Rufirallus viridis/fasciatus … ?]. Several specimens collected by Hauxwell, at Chamicurros and along the river Huallaga, in eastern Peru, in 1854 and at Pebas, Upper Amazons, Peru, 27 June 1866.
● "Furnarius leucopus hauxwelli" CHUBB 1918 (here) [Syn. Furnarius torridus SCLATER & SALVIN 1866]. Collected by Hauxwell, at Pebas, Peru, 29th of April 1867.
● "Icterus hauxwelli" SCLATER 1885 (here) [a single, juvenile specimen; syn. Icterus croconotus WAGLER 1829] ... collected by Hauxwell, at Chamicuros, "Amazonia Superior" (i.e. East Peru).

And finally, two obscure (also invalid), Humming-birds … for Martin to ponder over!
● "Lophornis hauxwelli" BOUCARD 1892 (here) [Syn. Lophornis chalybeus verreauxii BOURCIER 1853] Collected by Hauxwell, at Nauta, Upper Amazon.
● "Threnetes hauxwelli" BOUCARD 1895 (here, in Text) [Syn. Threnetes niger cervinicauda GOULD 1855]. Collected by Hauxwell, at Pebas, Peru, 26th of June 1867.

= J. ("John") Hauxwell, naturalist, explorer and collector (of various Naturalia; birds, mammals, fishes, snakes, plants, fossils … etc. etc.), mainly in Peru, but also in Ecuador (and possibly Brazil?), at least between 1854 all the way until July 1886. No dates, nor years, neither of his death nor birth. But at least we now know that he passed away, at some point, between July 1886 and 1919. Not much, but better than nothing. By Boucard's description, in 1892, it sounds like he was still alive at that point, at least as far as Boucard knew.

Anyone who does know whom we are dealing with?

The same "John Hauxwell" is also commemorated in (for example) the catfish Loricariichthys hauxwelli FOWLER 1915 (here). Type collected "many years ago" by Hauxwell, at/in the Ambyiacu River, Ecuador. In the same article there are loads of specimens of other fishes collected by the same Hauxwell!

But, he is probably not the Person commemorated in the Ant Polyrhachis hauxwelli BINGHAM 1903 (here). That one was collected (by some Hauxwell), at Tenasserim, in Asia!

Or?

However: enjoy!

Björn

PS. I´m not even convinced he was either English nor British (as have been claimed). It´s not that uncommon that any English-speaking Person (like US or Canadian citizens) are believed to be, or was/is called, Inglese in South America. Those OD's was published in both British and American Journals, hinting at some kind of preference (or simply who paid better!?). Note that some of his specimens ended up with Mr Orton in the local Vassar College Museum? Did Hauxwell possibly had any special connection to that certain College?

PPS. Anyone who've seen any obvious connection to England or Great Britain?
And; could "John" possibly be short for Jonathan, James or whatever?

_________________________________
*a k a hauxwelltrast, in Swedish, thereby my interest

Last edited by Calalp : Monday 29th April 2019 at 15:37. Reason: rephrased PS.
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Old Monday 29th April 2019, 15:28   #2
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The entry for "Hauxwell (J.)." in The history of the collections contained in the Natural history departments of the British museum... (vol 2, Birds, 1906), might also be of interest (here).

/B
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Old Tuesday 30th April 2019, 08:49   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Calalp View Post
But, he is probably not the Person commemorated in the Ant Polyrhachis hauxwelli BINGHAM 1903 (here). That one was collected (by some Hauxwell), at Tenasserim, in Asia!
But he is honored in an insect name Mnesarete hauxwelli. Maybe it is worth to research Mac Lachlan in context with him?

If I look into here it may worth to check:

Quote:
Lamas, G. 1980. Historia de la entomología en el Perú. II. Periodo de los viajeros, colectore y estudiosos especializados. Rev. per. Ent. 23(1): 25-31.
Here death 1919 with question marks. There is a reference to here.

The other is a T. A. Hauxwell Deputy Conservator of Forests here = Thomas Addison Hauxwell here probably him.

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Old Tuesday 30th April 2019, 09:51   #4
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Martin, note that a "T. A. Hauxwell "visited the BOC meetings; 17th of January and 21st of February 1900 (here). Apparently he (as well?) had some interest in Ornithology ...

Though still nothing new of "John" ...

/B
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Old Tuesday 30th April 2019, 11:52   #5
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If we trust here p. 55 (or 57 of 136)

Quote:
Hauxwell – John Hauxwell (1827-1919).
Mnesarete hauxwelli (Selys, 1869) [Orig. Lais hauxwelli).
Mecistogaster lucretia hauxwelli Selys, 1886
And here

Quote:
John Hauxwell (1827 - 1919) war ein kommerzieller Sammler aus England (s.o.), der sich ab Mitte des 19. Jahrhunderts über einen Zeitraum von fast 40 Jahren am oberen Amazonas und in Pebas (fast zehn Jahre lang Bürgermeister des Ortes) aufhielt und dort sammelte. Der überwiegende Teil seines odonatologischen Materials gelangte zu Selys-Longchamps, der zwei Arten nach ihm benannte.
So he was also ten years maire of Pebas. Where this dates came from? I have no idea. Here he was named Juan Hauxwell.

Quote:
Auch Abendroth's Exemplare der Pebasfossilien stammten aus der Hand des Herrn Juan Hauxwell, eines Engländers, der dort seit einer Reihe von Jahren ansässig sei.
He was also mentioned as a collector of shells here or here.

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Old Tuesday 30th April 2019, 14:04   #6
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Hauxwell/Hawkswell/Hawxwell ... !?

His first name does seems to have been "John", at least this is how he became known (and "famous") among contemporary Naturalists ... see:

List of Birds collected at Pebas, Upper Amazons, by Mr. John Hauxwell, with Notes and Descriptions of New Species, by Philip Lutley Sclater & Osbert Salvin, 1867 (here).

Catalogue of the species of batrachians and reptiles contained in a collection made at Pebas, upper Amazon, by John Hauxwell, by E. D. Cope, 1885 (here).

Also called the same here.

Thereby I think we can leave "T. A. [Thomas Addison] Hauxwell", and "his" insects, all together.

And, ... if we´re to trust John Gould we might expand the collecting period of Mr Hawkswell [sic], as having started (?, or was already in progress) as early as back in 1848; this as he apparently (here) collected a specimen of "Phaetornis eremita" GOULD 1849 [today considered a synonym of the Reddish Hermit Phaethornis ruber]... "procured by Mr. Hawkswell at Buena Vista in June 1848."

Where this "Buena Vista" (Boa Vista?) is located is unknown to me? Lots of places in Brazil with this name.

Also compare with the various spelling versions of his Surname, mentioned by Papavero et al, in the Paper: The travels of Joseph Beal Steere in Brazil, Peru and Ecuador (1870-1873), from 2008, here: " ... of/ Mr. Hauxwell (among which is a skin of Porzana hauxwelli, nobis),/ ..." [In the Appendix II, on p.262], alt. "... recieved kindly by Mr. John/ Hawxwell78, an English naturalist and/ collector, ..." [on p.170].

And the Foot-note: "78 John Hauxwell – Resided 30 years in the Amazon. Cope (1869, 1885) described fishes, amphibians and reptiles collected by him."

The search goes on!

Björn

PS. Not to be confused with R. (Ralph) Hawkswell (as of here).
-

Last edited by Calalp : Tuesday 30th April 2019 at 21:57. Reason: missed blue
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Old Tuesday 30th April 2019, 14:10   #7
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Ooups!

I was too busy reading, typing, linking, compiling my latest post, that I simply missed Martins ditto!

We're getting closer!

/B

PS. I will look into it all, later. I'm done for today. Thanks Martin. Off to work.
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Old Tuesday 30th April 2019, 20:40   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Calalp View Post
And, ... if we´re to trust John Gould we might expand the collecting period of Mr Hawkswell [sic], as having started (?, or was already in progress) as early as back in 1848; this as he apparently (here) collected a specimen of "Phaetornis eremita" GOULD 1849 [today considered a synonym of the Reddish Hermit Phaethornis ruber]... "procured by Mr. Hawkswell at Buena Vista in June 1848."

Where this "Buena Vista" (Boa Vista?) is located is unknown to me? Lots of places in Brazil with this name.
Gould got more specimen from him e.g. here. Not sure about this one. Here he collected Oct 19, 1883 at rio Tigre.

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Old Wednesday 1st May 2019, 08:00   #9
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I will go for John Hauxwell [that´s clearly, by far, the most common way his name was/is written], a k a "Juan" Hauxwell (in Spanish-talking South America), .... collector in Peru, Equador and Brazil, as well as in Colombia [i.e. the location Loretoyacu, in his time in Peru, today in Colombia], for close to 40 years, from 1848 until 1886, etc., etc., ...

In the Paper Conocimiento y control en los confines del territorio nacional: hacia la construcción de un saber territorial, 1850-1950, by Lina Marcela González Gómez (2010); "John Hauxwell" is described as: "colector profesional de aves e insectos" (on p.130).

The only thing that distubs me is his years, which I haven't been able to verify in any way. This far I woundn't dare to say more than (1827?–1919?) ...

Isn't an age over 90 very, very old for an Englishman in the Tropics!?

Sure, it's not unheard of, he could have been that old, but if he truly reached this respectable age ... with no proof ... well, I simply don't know.

Björn

PS. I assume James found it convincing enough, as the HBW Alive Key, have been updated, first from Sunday's "(fl. 1868)" to Monday's "(fl. 1886)" and then into Tuesday's (i.e. yesterday's):
Quote:
hauxwelli
John Hauxwell (1827-1919) English collector in Peru and Brazil (syn. Furnarius torridus, subsp. Henicorhina leucosticta, syn. Icterus croconotus, Isleria, syn. Lophornis chalybeus verreauxii, subsp. Pipromorpha oleaginea, syn. Rufirallus fasciatus, syn. Threnetes niger cervinicauda, Turdus).
It sure is an Alive Key!
--

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Old Wednesday 1st May 2019, 08:39   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Taphrospilus View Post
If we trust here p. 55 (or 57 of 136)
Quote:
Hauxwell – John Hauxwell (1827-1919).
Mnesarete hauxwelli (Selys, 1869) [Orig. Lais hauxwelli).
Mecistogaster lucretia hauxwelli Selys, 1886
And here
Quote:
John Hauxwell (1827 - 1919) war ein kommerzieller Sammler aus England (s.o.), der sich ab Mitte des 19. Jahrhunderts über einen Zeitraum von fast 40 Jahren am oberen Amazonas und in Pebas (fast zehn Jahre lang Bürgermeister des Ortes) aufhielt und dort sammelte. Der überwiegende Teil seines odonatologischen Materials gelangte zu Selys-Longchamps, der zwei Arten nach ihm benannte.
... Where this dates came from? I have no idea. ...
Martin, neither I understand where Joachim Hoffmann found the years given (in your second link above), in the German IDF-Report 16 (2009). The only reference I can find in it (with my meager understanding go German, that is), in direct connection to Hauxwell, is:

Lamas, G. 1980. Historia de la entomología en el Perú. Part II. Periodo de los viajeros, colectore y estudiosos especializados. Revista Peruana de Entomología 23 (1): 25-31, here [which is even worse!] all in Spanish (the full piece; pp.13-37, as of here).

... which doesn't (as far as I can tell) give us more than:
Quote:
John HAUXWELL [?-1919?] fue un comerciante inglés, colector profesional de aves e insectos ...
Maybe Part III, (Albores de la Entomología Económica) tells us anything additional (here). Also in Spanish (far, far beyond my reach).

Anyone keen, who does understand, either German or Spanish, feel like having a go?

Björn

PS. Martin, maybe you should send Joachim Hoffmann an e-mail? His e-mail-address is found on the title page ... (you're both Germans)
..

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Old Wednesday 1st May 2019, 18:35   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Calalp View Post
The only thing that distubs me is his years, which I haven't been able to verify in any way. This far I woundn't dare to say more than (1827?–1919?) ...

Isn't an age over 90 very, very old for an Englishman in the Tropics!?
But consider 1848 he was first time mentioned. So 21 years would be a good age to start this kind of career. And as you mentioned 1919 is also possible from the Revista Peruana de Entomología article.

I really think Joachim Hoffmann had some more information due to this part

Quote:
(fast zehn Jahre lang Bürgermeister des Ortes)
Means mayor (and not maire as I wrote in #5) of the village for almost ten years.
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Old Thursday 2nd May 2019, 08:07   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Taphrospilus View Post
But consider 1848 he was first time mentioned. So 21 years would be a good age to start this kind of career. And as you mentioned 1919 is also possible from the Revista Peruana de Entomología article.
...
I agree that 1827 is a fairly (highly) likely Birth year, but I would like to see some sort of confirmation of his death ... that this year isn't simply originating in Chubb's phrase "the late J. Hauxwell", from 1919. Chubb didn't say anything of when (neither recently nor for how long) Hauxwell at that point had been "late".

To be continued ...
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Old Thursday 2nd May 2019, 11:29   #13
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I am wondering if here is the same John Hauxwell?

Quote:
Mr. John Hauxwell, the curator, exhibited a case containing several varieties of the humming bird, Trochiledae, in excellent preservation, and arranged with much skill and taste.
We might have to check Richmond and North Riding Naturalists Field Club or connections to Richmond (North Yorkshire).

He was mentioned as well several time in A monograph of the jacamars and puff-birds, or families Galbulidæ and Bucconidæ

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Old Friday 3rd May 2019, 08:17   #14
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Martin, I also found that piece (from 1876) telling us that; "... Mr. John Hauxwell, the curator, exhibited a case containing several varieties of humming bird, ..."

And thinking (out loud); Could this possibly be a second (parallell) carreer, or simply a namesake, another guy all together?!? (If so; who was he?) And could it somehow be that guy, and "his years" ... that, in some odd way, ended up on "our" Hauxwell?

Note that "our" guy, already in 1866, was called: "...the veteran South American collector, Mr. John Hauxwell : ..." (here).

And I think he was still (stuck) in South America during the 1870's (at least most of it?) .. and onwards.
Quote:
"The following were elected correspondents: John Hauxwell, of Pebas, Equador ..."

[Proceedings of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia (of 1871), here, bottom, p.56]
... in the same journal, also mentioned on pp. 200, 221, 250, 275 and 347.

Also see Straube (2013), p.67:
Quote:
c.1850 O coletor profissional inglês John Hauxwell, passa a residir, até por volta de 1870, no alto Amazonas, encaminhando suas coleções ao Museu Britânico, onde foram estudadas por John Gould, Philip L.Sclater e Osbert Salvin.

[here]
Tricky guy to close in on!

/B
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Old Wednesday 8th May 2019, 07:40   #15
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The mayor may derived from here. On p. 227 is written...

Quote:
We arrived at Pebas December 12, ten hours after leaving the mouth of the Napo, and a mon th and a half from Quito. The first individual we met addressed us in good English, and proved to be Mr . Hauxwell, a well-known collector of birds and insects, who has resided thir ty years on the Amazon . His house, the largest an d best in town, though but a roofed stockade, was generously placed at our disposal, and the fatted calf— an immense turtle— was immediately killed.
and p.228...

Quote:
Excepting Mr. Hauxwell, the Peruvian governor, and two or three other whites, the inhabitan ts are Indian s of the Orejones and Yagua tribes.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Calalp View Post
Isn't an age over 90 very, very old for an Englishman in the Tropics!?

Concernings about the age may destroyed by the comment regarding to the health of Mr. Hauxwell...

Quote:
The few English residents (Messrs. Hislop, Jeffreys, and Hauxwell), who have lived here thirty or forty years, are as fresh and florid as if they had never left their native country.
Annyway Joseph Charles Hippolyte Crosse named Bulimus hauxwelli after him.

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Old Thursday 9th May 2019, 06:57   #16
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In my mind, the second quote could as well be read as:

Excepting Mr. Hauxwell, [and] the Peruvian governor, [as well as] two or three other whites, ...

Couldn't it?

I doubt Hauxwell ever was a "Peruvian governor" .

Björn
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Old Thursday 9th May 2019, 07:02   #17
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And Martin, note that James Orton's book Andes and the Amazon or, Across the Continent of South America (third edition, revised and enlarged)*, was published in 1876. And that Orton met Mr Hauxwell in December 1868 ...

Regarding the latter quote (from p.286), it is not that hard to look "fresh and florid" when in your early 40's, it´s a whole different thing 50 years later.

At that point, 1919 was still far, far away ...

/B

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*same book, also full view in BHL, here
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Old Thursday 9th May 2019, 21:06   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Calalp View Post
In my mind, the second quote could as well be read as:

Excepting Mr. Hauxwell, [and] the Peruvian governor, [as well as] two or three other whites, ...

Couldn't it?

I doubt Hauxwell ever was a "Peruvian governor" .
It certainly could be read that way. On the other hand "Peruvian governor" might not be an exalted role, it might just be "white guy in charge of the village". So yes, there are some ambiguities in that sentence.
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Old Friday 10th May 2019, 09:59   #19
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Originally Posted by Calalp View Post
PS. Martin, maybe you should send Joachim Hoffmann an e-mail? His e-mail-address is found on the title page ... (you're both Germans)
I contacted Mr. Hoffmann. His last answer about this topic is that he can't remember exactly but he worked in Lima with Gerardo Lamas and it is possible that Lamas got additional insights after his publication. As well it is possible that the information (I assume) came from Beiträge zur Fauna Perus from Woldemar Erich Titschack. As well he wrote that Hauxwell for sure did not die in Peru (but did not write where).

So it might be worth to contact Gerardo Lamas Müller (picture here and CV). Does anyone know if all four volumes of Beiträge zur Fauna Perus are somewhere online?

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Old Sunday 19th May 2019, 08:53   #20
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Well done, and thanks, Martin ... thereby; the search continues.

Before the long stay in Pebas, Peru, Hauxwell seems to have joined Alfred Russel Wallace, in the Amazons, in the early 1850's (as of here) ... at that time (in 1851, here) he seems to have lived in Barra, on the Rio Negro (which I assume is today's Manaus, in the Amazonian part of Brazil, as of here). Also see here ...

However (we're seemingly running out of options, at least I am getting short of ideas, on how to find/trace him); nothing additional found.

Nothing (contemporary) on Hauxwell's Birth, nor on his death.

/B
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Old Sunday 26th May 2019, 13:39   #21
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I contacted Prof Dr. Gerardo Lamas. His reply was the following:

Quote:
Unfortunately, I have not been able to find any reliable biographical data on John Hauxwell. Even the dates of birth (1827) and death (1919) given for him appear to be spurious. The only true facts about him seem to be that he was an Englishman living for about 30 years in the small town of Pebas, in Loreto, Peru, and collecting mammals, birds, herpetological specimens, butterflies, snails, etc. there and in several other places along the upper Amazon riven and some of its tributaries, sending those specimens to Europe (mainly England) and the USA. Before settling in Pebas he spent some time (in the 1850's) in Manuas, Brazil. Several naturalists passing through Pebas (like Orton, Steere, etc.) met him there, and Darwin was in correspondence with him. My guess is that Hauxwell stayed in Pebas and died there, and he may have started a Peruvian family, as the surname Hauxwell is not all that rare in the Loreto area of Peru...
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Old Sunday 26th May 2019, 15:21   #22
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Thanks, Martin!

All in line with what we've come up with, this far ...

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Old Monday 27th May 2019, 12:52   #23
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So one of his descendants may or may not Sixto Hauxwell Mariño. But I have no clue how to contact him.
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Old Saturday 1st June 2019, 09:31   #24
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Hold on to your hats!

Finally, some progress, I was just about to give up on finding anything additional regarding Hauxwell, after hundreds of Google-searches, in all various combinations, but at last, here's a (in my mind) long-awaited, minor break-through ...

In the book Notes of a botanist on the Amazon & Andes, ... by Richards Spruce (edited and condensed by Alfred Russel Wallace ...), vol. 2, 1908 (here), we find the following text (on page 74):

Quote:
[The next letter from Tarapoto to Mr. Bentham, dated April 7, 1856, is chiefly personal and botanical gossip relating to his work and future travels. After describing how a box from England was damaged and nearly lost by the boat being wrecked in the rapids of the Huallaga he adds: “The difficulty, risk, and expense of getting plants from here all the way to the mouth of the Amazon are so great, that I see my Tarapoto collections are not likely to repay more than the expense of collecting.”
The letter concludes with a reference to the news he had just received of the ravages of yellow fever at the Barra, and then gives a short biographical note about a bird-collector, whose name and specimens must be well known to most English ornithologists. I therefore give it.]
"I am sorry to say that Hauxwell is about perdito (lost) as far as natural history is concerned, which is a pity, as no one has come here who puts up birds so beautifully as he does. He has got an Indian squaw and a child, and is turned ‘merchant’. I am surprised he writes English (with a small taste of ‘Yorkshire’) so well as he does. His parents removed from Hull (where he was born) to Oporto when he was a little boy; thence he came out to the coast of Brazil as merchant's clerk, and anon turned naturalist."


[written, as I understand it, by Alfred Russel Wallace referring to, and quoting, a letter sent by the botanical collector Richard Spruce, from Tarapoto, Peru]
Even if, as we all know by now, Mr Hauxwell wasn't lost to natural history (as Mr Spruce feared), but kept on collecting, preparing and selling birds (also as a merchant), well into the mid-1880's, this letter does tell us some of his origin! And that Hauxwell, like Professor Lamas assumed, apparently did start a "Peruvian family".

This is the first text ever where I have seen anything of where he was born! In Hull (which I assume is Kingston upon Hull), in Yorkshire, on the East coast of England. And of how Mr Hauxwell ended up in South America ...

The search goes on. We're getting closer.

If of nothing else, now I feel a bit more secure claiming he was English ...

However; enjoy!

Björn
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