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August moths

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Old Wednesday 19th August 2015, 12:10   #26
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A good night for me last night, although nothing like the scale of thread 19...an excellent haul by anybody's standards! (fingers x'd that I might get another one this year).

On the heels of my previous post.....''The Gods have Answered''
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Old Wednesday 19th August 2015, 16:31   #27
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I work at our local airport and found plenty of Rush Veneers and Silver Ys in the passenger walkways yesterday. ( They were attracted to the lights, they hadn't flown in from Alicante.) Had high hopes when I put the trap out last night but a pretty ordinary night with just a single migrant, a Diamond-back Moth, amongst the 24 species.

Reached 4000 moths for the year though. How many of you count every moth or do you just count the species? I've never really had the time before but this year I've meticulously recorded every one. It's probably more important to record the fluctuations in the common local moth populations than record the rarities for your garden. Would you agree?
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Old Wednesday 19th August 2015, 22:46   #28
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Reached 4000 moths for the year though. How many of you count every moth or do you just count the species? I've never really had the time before but this year I've meticulously recorded every one. It's probably more important to record the fluctuations in the common local moth populations than record the rarities for your garden. Would you agree?
I'm afraid I'm ''lapsed'' on the counting! However I agree that from a stats. perspective you are making an ''historical'' contribution to the local record book, and as such, this should be deemed worthwhile.

However, FWIW I wouldn't make a distinction between ''regular and rare'', as species fluctuate over time, expanding and contracting...as they do.

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Old Friday 21st August 2015, 07:30   #29
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However, FWIW I wouldn't make a distinction between ''regular and rare'', as species fluctuate over time, expanding and contracting...as they do.

Cheers
I don't know about that Ken. I have species that I consider my regular, resident moths such as Heart and Dart, Willow Beauty, Riband Wave etc and then there are other species that I have recorded just once or twice including 'rarities' such as Dewick's Plusia, Clancy's Rustic, Plumed Fan-foot etc. These are just wanderers that happened to be attracted to my light as they passed by. The regular locals live around here. The rarities though interesting and exciting don't count in any way in demonstrating how the local moth poulations are doing but counting the individual 'common' species does. Mind you this year it seems as if Plumed Fan-foot may be becoming one of my residents.

One of the best nights of the year last night, 208 moths of 53 species, 2 NFG with one tortrix still to ID.

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Old Friday 21st August 2015, 08:01   #30
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I work at our local airport and found plenty of Rush Veneers and Silver Ys in the passenger walkways yesterday. ( They were attracted to the lights, they hadn't flown in from Alicante.) Had high hopes when I put the trap out last night but a pretty ordinary night with just a single migrant, a Diamond-back Moth, amongst the 24 species.

Reached 4000 moths for the year though. How many of you count every moth or do you just count the species? I've never really had the time before but this year I've meticulously recorded every one. It's probably more important to record the fluctuations in the common local moth populations than record the rarities for your garden. Would you agree?
I do try to count, certainly the macros, must confess to being a bit lax on the micros when I'm in a hurry (ie any weekday!). However, I've never tried to add up how many moths I've seen in total - I guess it would only be relevant for comparison if divided by the number of nights' trapping it covers?
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Old Friday 21st August 2015, 14:08   #31
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I record all my trapping sessions on spread sheets which makes it easy to keep a record of totals etc. It also makes it easy to compare year for year. For example I have only recorded Prays fraxinella twice, once on 20.08.10 and again last night 20.08.15. These comparisons interest me. The 2010 record was of the dark form, is this considered a distinct species nowadays?
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Old Friday 21st August 2015, 14:45   #32
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I can also at the click of the mouse tell that Epiphyas postvittana has been my commonest moth this year both by numbers counted and nights trapped, 428 on 51 nights. I'm not surprised by this but I am surprised that my 9th commonest moth so far this year by individuals counted is the Clay with 98. I like this sort of thing and yes I need to get out more.
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Old Saturday 22nd August 2015, 00:14   #33
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I do try to count, certainly the macros, must confess to being a bit lax on the micros when I'm in a hurry (ie any weekday!). However, I've never tried to add up how many moths I've seen in total - I guess it would only be relevant for comparison if divided by the number of nights' trapping it covers?
When trapping back in the UK I used to count everything but over here less so, in part due to the fact that surprisingly few moths turn up in anything other than singles. There are notable exceptions such as 40+ Hyles livornicoides in one session but in general whilst I can easily get 50+ species I suppose no more than five of them actually turn up in numbers greater than 1 and I virtually never get into double figures for a species so I now just make a note of any unusual numbers
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Old Tuesday 25th August 2015, 06:07   #34
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From 310 moths of 58 species on Friday night to 30 moths of 16 species last night.

Does a day's heavy rain waterlog and kill the moths or do they just sit tight until they dry out?
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Old Wednesday 26th August 2015, 13:03   #35
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I record all my trapping sessions on spread sheets which makes it easy to keep a record of totals etc. It also makes it easy to compare year for year. For example I have only recorded Prays fraxinella twice, once on 20.08.10 and again last night 20.08.15. These comparisons interest me. The 2010 record was of the dark form, is this considered a distinct species nowadays?
This is now known as Dark Ash Bud Moth (Prays ruficeps). I had this for first time this year and was totally stumped. I had to post it to a local online moth forum to get an ID as it's not illustrated in my guides, even as a distinct form.
Thought birding was bad enough for splitting!
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Old Wednesday 26th August 2015, 20:24   #36
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Hi
Just to add a rider to this. I believe that ruficeps has been accepted in some parts of Europe for a number of years and it is possibly not the same as the dark form (rustica) of fraxinella but both species may occur in the UK.
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Old Saturday 29th August 2015, 13:35   #37
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Quite quiet lately. A few Rusty Dot Pearl, Dark Sword Grass and Silver Y being the only migrants and the first Yellow Belle last night since 2010. 5036 moths counted for the year now over 87 nights.
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Old Saturday 29th August 2015, 16:42   #38
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First time I have had the trap out for a week last night. 95 moths of 18 species. Best for me were single Tissue and Centre-barred sallow, both only my second ever.

Four Old Ladies was odd - usually I only catch odd ones each year but this month I have caught at least one every time the trap has been out.

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Old Sunday 30th August 2015, 11:23   #39
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Our third (or fourth) patch record of Jersey Tiger to my garden trap overnight. We have had three and there is an additional record for the patch in the county atlas seen by others.

Our second was also this year by day at some allotments in Clevedon earlier in the month. It colonised South Somerset during the last decade quite successfully and is plainly heading north.

All the best
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Old Sunday 30th August 2015, 11:26   #40
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Hi
Just to add a rider to this. I believe that ruficeps has been accepted in some parts of Europe for a number of years and it is possibly not the same as the dark form (rustica) of fraxinella but both species may occur in the UK.
Martin
I consider that I have had both forms of fraxinella and ruficeps locally. Not all dark fraxinella types on my patch are ruficeps certainly.

All the best
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Old Sunday 30th August 2015, 13:44   #41
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Sitting at home this lunchtime I noticed something bright out the corner of my eye, flitting about the garden. Dashing out into the garden I managed to locate what it was - a nice Jersey Tiger. Not unexpected in London (SW18) but a new species for the garden. Popped back in to get the camera and managed to get a couple of shots of it, while balanced on top of a step ladder as it was about 10ft up a tree.
Martin
Yes a beautiful moth, I was just trying to Identify what form This one was I think it is the red form, I have the red and yellow form Together On the cover of my Observers book of larger moths by R. L. E. FORD Revised Edition, Frederick Warne & Co Ltd. London, England 1974
It mentions in this book that the species was more or less confined to the County of Devonshire where it occured in Colonies in several places, so Pleaseing to see the successful spread of this moth in 41 years I,ve not Looked But possibly spread its range further than london, as a kid in the 60,s I remember my dad bringing back from work specimens of the Garden Tiger Moth which used to get caught up in buildings or lighting, and I also found The Larva often in the garden not sure what food plant it ate, but have never Come across any adult moths myself and no Larva since a kid, "woolly bears" we called them, would love to see them back sometime perhaps even With a Jersey Tiger Moth

Coal Tit.

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Old Sunday 30th August 2015, 18:36   #42
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Hi Coal Tit
Perhaps a forlorn hope. When I first moved to London I used to find Garden Tiger larvae on some nearby allotments and would also see the moth quite regularly but not since the massive decline. To see it now your best chance is near the coast as it's all byt disappearred from central England. Let's keep hoping, though.
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Old Sunday 30th August 2015, 21:10   #43
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Hi Coal Tit
Perhaps a forlorn hope. When I first moved to London I used to find Garden Tiger larvae on some nearby allotments and would also see the moth quite regularly but not since the massive decline. To see it now your best chance is near the coast as it's all byt disappearred from central England. Let's keep hoping, though.
Martin
Hi Martin, So sorry to hear about the massive decline, when Did this happen? such a attractive moth their wings always (as their name tiger Moth) always made me think of the bi plane and the same markings on the Wings if those markings ever existed, yes there is a good chance I have,nt Seen a garden tiger specimen since before 1970 I thought that very odd as Time went on thinking how common they were as a kid, it just goes to show How you can miss out on things under your nose, If not keeping Informed, thou I was Informed and knew it was happening because of Information recieved the last time any similar thing happened to me was When the Corn Bunting started to Disappear from the big flocks I could Remember recording in the winter months and early spring in derbyshire it Happened all so quickly as elsewhere in the country too


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Old Sunday 30th August 2015, 21:35   #44
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Hi
The information about the decline came from the published results of about 60 years of the Rothamstead Insect Survey Light trap network.
The situation with Garden Tiger is worse than I said. I just picked this up from part of the Butterfly Conservation website: "These include the Garden Tiger and its familiar 'woolly bear' caterpillar (down 92% since 1968)".
Shocking figures!
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Old Sunday 30th August 2015, 21:56   #45
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Hi
The information about the decline came from the published results of about 60 years of the Rothamstead Insect Survey Light trap network.
The situation with Garden Tiger is worse than I said. I just picked this up from part of the Butterfly Conservation website: "These include the Garden Tiger and its familiar 'woolly bear' caterpillar (down 92% since 1968)".
Shocking figures!
Martin
Hi there, I wonder why this has happened, 1967/68 is Exactly The time I remember seeing the larva perhaps even 1969, I can,t Remember Any news about the decline happening at all and I have seen a few papers relateing to moths since this period but no mention of garden tiger Disappearing which I thought I would have done when at this scale of decline, Yes shocking figures Indeed.
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Old Sunday 30th August 2015, 22:08   #46
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Had my first and only Tiger Moth last year! And yes I can remember them in the late '50's very common. However a question...having dealt with a "decline", has anybody noted an increase in Hornets?

Over the last few years I've had the odd one..then two...earlier in July I had 6 on consecutive nights, and currently tonight up to 12 so far! They seem to be "strongly" attracted to my Actinic, and mostly are often found moribund, or going that way in the morning.....has anybody else noted an increase?

Cheers

Last edited by KenM : Monday 31st August 2015 at 12:54. Reason: edit
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Old Monday 31st August 2015, 10:43   #47
coal tit
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Had my first and only Tiger Moth last year! And yes I can remember them in the late '50's very common. However a question...having dealt with a "decline", has anybody noted an increase in Hornets?

Over the last few years I've had the odd one..then two...earlier in July I had 6 on consecutive nights, and currently tonight up to 12 so far! They seem to be "strongly" attracted to my Actinic, and mostly are Often found moribund, or going that way in the morning.....has anybody else noted an increase?

Cheers
Hi Ken, It was on may 16th last year I saw My first "Ever" hornet in my conservatory, to start with I was unsure what I Was looking at its size Impressed me compared to a wasp, it was quite active But stayed to one side of the conservatory going up and down The glass, full of excitement (Like a big kid ) I could,nt resist videoing it in a glass jar before releaseing it outdoors and down loading the video on to Birdforums tv link, I have never seen a hornet anywhere before so to get my First record at home was exciteing, like anything you see that is new but More so being at home its surpriseing what you see at home if your Lucky And look long enough PS I titled the video queen hornet which I believe was wrong, I would Imagine Their bigger?

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Old Monday 31st August 2015, 13:01   #48
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PS I titled the video queen hornet which I believe was wrong, I would Imagine Their bigger?
Hi Coal Tit,
Can't comment on the size of the ''Queen''...If she is larger? that would be a sight to behold!

I reckon it's either climate change or...a nest ''not very far away''
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Old Tuesday 1st September 2015, 06:44   #49
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First Vestal for the garden last night and bang on cue the first Old Lady of the year. I have only recorded them between 30th August and 10th September, but every year without fail.

No Common Wainscots this year at all which is strange.

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Old Tuesday 1st September 2015, 14:59   #50
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Hi Coal Tit,
Can't comment on the size of the ''Queen''...If she is larger? that would be a sight to behold!

I reckon it's either climate change or...a nest ''not very far away''
Hi Ken, yes anything is possible there, I,ve not checked up to see if the queen hornet is bigger I,m looking forward to finding out on google etc if she is bigger She would certainly make a good photo if it was possible, I have a fig tree Outdoors and this year Ive decided from now on any fruit that is on There The Blackbirds, the wasps, and any butterflies can have the fruit has it Does Me no favours any more, shame because I enjoyed them, but the wasps love The figs, I,m sure if there was any hornets around they would be drawn to Them to.

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