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Your most anticipated futures books

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Old Thursday 9th April 2020, 18:58   #426
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I think the point generally is to highlight what we have lost, so people become more concerned about what we COULD lose.
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Old Friday 10th April 2020, 00:50   #427
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The Largest Avian Radiation

Looks interesting: https://www.lynxeds.com/product/the-...ian-radiation/
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Old Friday 10th April 2020, 05:28   #428
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Does Europe even have any (recent) confirmed extinct birds?
I don't think there's any realistic hope of Slender-billed Curlew still surviving at this point.
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Old Friday 10th April 2020, 09:17   #429
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National Geographic has for many many editions included extinct birds in the back, put in with the ultra-rare vagrants.

Does Europe even have any (recent) confirmed extinct birds? I know the Mediterranean region suffered a wave of bird extinction, but thousands of years ago.
Great Auk would be the only one I know of, there are birds that don't breed anymore which were fairly regular but that's about it AFAIK.

With the possible exception of Bachman's Warber, I just can't see the point of including extinct species unless you have a genuine hope that populations of e.g Passenger Pigeon persist somewhere?
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Old Friday 10th April 2020, 09:54   #430
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Somewhat stretching the definition of Europe, Canarian Black Oystercatcher became extinct in modern times, although that is now considered to be a sub-species of Eurasian Oystercatcher. Also the exsul subspecies of Chiffchaff.

I'm trying to think of resident birds that are recently extinct in Europe, but not globally. Andalusian Hemipode is one.

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Old Friday 10th April 2020, 12:22   #431
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Somewhat stretching the definition of Europe, Canarian Black Oystercatcher became extinct in modern times, although that is now considered to be a sub-species of Eurasian Oystercatcher. Also the exsul subspecies of Chiffchaff.

I'm trying to think of resident birds that are recently extinct in Europe, but not globally. Andalusian Hemipode is one.
That's just a race of Common Buttonquail.
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Old Friday 10th April 2020, 13:45   #432
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That's just a race of Common Buttonquail.
hence the inclusion of not extinct globally.

Looking through online sources, other than Great Auk and (probably) Slender-billed Curlew, you have Holocene extinction of (not sure the extinct chronology is very good) of Ibiza Rail (from Ibiza of course) and maybe Cretan owl, a big possibly flightless Athene owl from Crete. I would imagine evolving along humans + the ice age geography being really brutal already to wildlife, filtering out a lot of taxa, probably explains the lack of extinct birds. I wouldn't be surprised though if more Mediterranean extinctions weren't determined in the future.
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Old Friday 10th April 2020, 16:40   #433
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hence the inclusion of not extinct globally.

Looking through online sources, other than Great Auk and (probably) Slender-billed Curlew, you have Holocene extinction of (not sure the extinct chronology is very good) of Ibiza Rail (from Ibiza of course) and maybe Cretan owl, a big possibly flightless Athene owl from Crete. I would imagine evolving along humans + the ice age geography being really brutal already to wildlife, filtering out a lot of taxa, probably explains the lack of extinct birds. I wouldn't be surprised though if more Mediterranean extinctions weren't determined in the future.
Also a flightless owl from the Azores:
RANDO, J. C., ALCOVER, J. A., OLSON, S. L., & PIEPER, H. (2013). A new species of extinct scops owl (Aves: Strigiformes: Strigidae: Otus) from São Miguel Island (Azores Archipelago, North Atlantic Ocean). Zootaxa, 3647(2), 343. doi:10.11646/zootaxa.3647.2.6
PDF
http://www.sci-news.com/paleontology...res-01182.html

and another owl from Madeira: https://phys.org/news/2012-03-extinc...l-madeira.html

There are a few other species (Puffinus bollei, etc), but these are older extinctions.
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Old Sunday 12th April 2020, 20:27   #434
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]I've belatedly come across a book published late last year in Spanish called Aves Rapaces de Europa (see https://www.weboryx.com/bookshop-gea...europa-p-62033 and https://www.birdingthestrait.com/blo...itorial-omega/). It looks like a good addition to any raptor enthusiast's bookshelf so let's hope that an English language edition is in hand
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Old Sunday 12th April 2020, 23:27   #435
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Regarding extinct birds in Europe: you have Pterodroma petrels from Britain and Sweden, and quite a lot of birds from Canaries (a flightless quail, a flightless bunting, a greenfinch, two shearwaters etc.), Madeira and Azores. However all of them are known only from bones, so no chance of a nice illustration.

Narrowing to the mainland Europe: Northern Bald Ibis and Siberian Crane got extinct (there is only one individual Siberian Crane left).
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Old Friday 1st May 2020, 22:26   #436
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New publication from the Sound Approach announced

A new book on birds of Morocco from the Sound Approach Team is one I'll look forward to getting...

https://soundapproach.co.uk/new-soun...s-coming-soon/
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Old Friday 1st May 2020, 23:43   #437
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A new book on birds of Morocco from the Sound Approach Team is one I'll look forward to getting...

https://soundapproach.co.uk/new-soun...s-coming-soon/
Looks stunning!
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Old Saturday 2nd May 2020, 06:42   #438
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Hmmm,
as a 'pureist', I find it hard to enthuse about products like this. Looks like the result of a forbiden tryst on a forgotten bookshelf at the back of a darkened room where a traditional book was seduced by a mysterious newcomer, producing a hybrid, the unholy offspring of book and tech.
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Old Saturday 2nd May 2020, 07:04   #439
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Hmmm,
as a 'pureist', I find it hard to enthuse about products like this. Looks like the result of a forbiden tryst on a forgotten bookshelf at the back of a darkened room where a traditional book was seduced by a mysterious newcomer, producing a hybrid, the unholy offspring of book and tech.
the book is essentially like the others in the series Andy, they have just stepped over from CD to usb for the recordings. For anyone interested in bird sounds, ID or taxonomy the whole series (with the exception of Birding from the Hip - which has great recordings) are some of the most best books around.
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Old Saturday 2nd May 2020, 09:53   #440
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A new book on birds of Morocco from the Sound Approach Team is one I'll look forward to getting...

https://soundapproach.co.uk/new-soun...s-coming-soon/
All the 'Sound Approach' volumes are great books in terms of content and this one promises to be no different. However, I find them almost impossible to read for any length of time. A landscape format with a short spine and deep pages may be OK for coffee table art/photographic books but it makes books difficult to hold comfortably and to read. Although I greatly admire the scholarship and knowledge they contain I've never yet managed to read one all the way through or to do so for more than a few minutes without becoming irritated by the design. There's a reason why, overwhelmingly, books have long spines and less deep pages ....
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Old Saturday 2nd May 2020, 10:34   #441
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All the 'Sound Approach' volumes are great books in terms of content and this one promises to be no different. However, I find them almost impossible to read for any length of time. A landscape format with a short spine and deep pages may be OK for coffee table art/photographic books but it makes books difficult to hold comfortably and to read. Although I greatly admire the scholarship and knowledge they contain I've never yet managed to read one all the way through or to do so for more than a few minutes without becoming irritated by the design. There's a reason why, overwhelmingly, books have long spines and less deep pages ....
I echo everything said here, also don't like the sound buttons, they remind me of the books I have for my baby with barn yard sounds, just provide a CD wih the book!

I admire the scholarship involved but really detest the format.
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Old Sunday 3rd May 2020, 17:24   #442
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I have used the CDs of the earlier books just once each: to get out computer file system files for much easier use than CDs. Let's see how the new system works. I am ready to complain, in any case. I am just wondering what the letters USB stand for. Yes, I know that it may be Universal Serial Bus or Universidad Simón Bolívar, but I do not see how these are applicable in this case.
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Old Sunday 3rd May 2020, 18:05   #443
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I have used the CDs of the earlier books just once each: to get out computer file system files for much easier use than CDs. Let's see how the new system works. I am ready to complain, in any case. I am just wondering what the letters USB stand for. Yes, I know that it may be Universal Serial Bus or Universidad Simón Bolívar, but I do not see how these are applicable in this case.
A flash drive type device?

'New two-part interactive digital Maghreb Key Species Guide included on accompanying USB. They can be read and listened to with an interactive ePUB3 reader like iBooks (Apple iOS) or Lithium (Android).'
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Old Monday 4th May 2020, 03:28   #444
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I echo everything said here, also don't like the sound buttons, they remind me of the books I have for my baby with barn yard sounds, just provide a CD wih the book!

I admire the scholarship involved but really detest the format.
What about those of us that don't have a CD player anymore!
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Old Monday 4th May 2020, 05:43   #445
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What about those of us that don't have a CD player anymore!
Why wouldn't you have one?

Must admit that I don't have a standalone CD player but I have one in a DAB digital radio and one in my PC tower.
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Old Monday 4th May 2020, 06:49   #446
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Why wouldn't you have one?

Must admit that I don't have a standalone CD player but I have one in a DAB digital radio and one in my PC tower.
Because it’s 2020....
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Old Monday 4th May 2020, 07:59   #447
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Because it’s 2020....
Always good to have hard copy and I have tons of photos on CD, most people will still use them.
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Old Monday 4th May 2020, 08:07   #448
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Why wouldn't you have one?
Not needed one for a few years now - last couple laptops not had one either.

It's annoying about some old photos etc that are still on CD, but they're not something I'm likely to look at again anyhow.

USB is next - I try to just work with USB-C, so have to use an adaptor even for a USB now!

Makes me feel almost as old as you, Andy!

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Old Monday 4th May 2020, 08:53   #449
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Not needed one for a few years now - last couple laptops not had one either.

It's annoying about some old photos etc that are still on CD, but they're not something I'm likely to look at again anyhow.

USB is next - I try to just work with USB-C, so have to use an adaptor even for a USB now!

Makes me feel almost as old as you, Andy!

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Since we met, around my 40th, the time has gone soooooooooooo fast it's unreal, 20 years in a blink almost.
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Old Monday 4th May 2020, 20:29   #450
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A new book on lizards scheduled for October 2020

Lizards of the World Natural History and Taxon Accounts by Gordon H Rodda

https://www.nhbs.com/lizards-of-the-...eid=a95fdefca3
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