Join for FREE
It only takes a minute!
Zeiss - Always on the lookout for something special – Shop now

Welcome to BirdForum.
BirdForum is the net's largest birding community, dedicated to wild birds and birding, and is absolutely FREE! You are most welcome to register for an account, which allows you to take part in lively discussions in the forum, post your pictures in the gallery and more.

Dragonfly ID Pointers

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rating: Thread Rating: 45 votes, 5.00 average.
Old Tuesday 23rd August 2005, 12:17   #26
Adey Baker
Member
 
Adey Baker's Avatar

 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Hinckley, Leics
Posts: 4,954
Here's a very mature female Common Darter showing some red colouring on the abdomen - the wings can also be coloured slightly but the leaf in the background is masking that somewhat!
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	mature-fem-com-dart-aug-23-.jpg
Views:	486
Size:	45.3 KB
ID:	28491  
Adey Baker is offline  
Reply With Quote

BF Supporter 2005 2006 2007 2009 Support BirdForum With A Donation

Old Saturday 3rd September 2005, 19:44   #27
Hauer
Registered User
 
Hauer's Avatar

 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: The Hague, NL
Posts: 347
Hi - Just thought I would share some info with you too..... I placed a forum article some time ago on Steve's DigiCams website regarding my personal experience with reverse lens photography. I thought, I would share as much info as possible from my side as there appears to be much interest in respect of this technique and experienced first-hand that it is not always easy to obtain all required components.

Here is the link: http://www.stevesforums.com/forums/v...10&forum_id=50

Do note that the various pictures are not displayed unless you login / register. The website links that I have mentioned offer besides inspiration, a vast amount of info on techniques in respect of insect photography.

Hope its of use. Thanks to you all for sharing the above wonderful info / photos!

Cheers - Herman Auer
__________________
My motto: To learn more today, than I knew yesterday!
Hauer is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Saturday 3rd September 2005, 21:55   #28
Surreybirder
Ken Noble
 
Surreybirder's Avatar

 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Lingfield Surrey
Posts: 8,263
Quote:
Originally Posted by puffinboy
Further to previous posts - here is a direct comparison of a Migrant Hawker (left) and a Southern Hawker (right)

Migrants are a little smaller and appear gray/blue at a distance and note the almost non-existant antehumeral stripes - also often seen in large numbers

Southerns are more robust and are more green/blue at a distance with the green broad antehumeral stripes very visible

Took the Migrant Hawker photo today after having several frustrating previous outings waiting for them to land :(

On this occasion not only did one land right in front of me but then another joined it...!!

Cheers Tom, East Sussex, UK
Has anyone got a pic of Common hawker to show the long thin antehumeral stripes? I've never seen the species locally but Southern and Migrant are both common.
Ken
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	southern_hawker2.jpg
Views:	467
Size:	148.0 KB
ID:	29314  Click image for larger version

Name:	pres-migrant_hawker.jpg
Views:	447
Size:	22.2 KB
ID:	29315  
Surreybirder is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Saturday 3rd September 2005, 22:44   #29
Ashton.P
Registered User
 
Ashton.P's Avatar

 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: East Yorkshire
Posts: 58
Hi Ken,

Photo attached showing the thin antehumeral stripes and yellow costa (edge of wing) of a male Common Hawker, also second picture of female showing minimal antehumeral but still obvious yellow costa.

Regards,
Paul.
East Riding Dragonflies
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	commonhawker3.jpg
Views:	489
Size:	42.1 KB
ID:	29321  Click image for larger version

Name:	comhawf3.jpg
Views:	487
Size:	33.5 KB
ID:	29322  
Ashton.P is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Wednesday 14th September 2005, 12:08   #30
psilo
Registered User
 
psilo's Avatar

 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Bolton,UK
Posts: 13,979
As Adey was kind enough to give me a positive id I thought that I would add my black darter (Sympetrum danae) photos here. These are quite a bit smaller than the common darter and when they fly they have the most beautiful blue wings. Being very dark though I found them very difficult to photograph. The literature says that they are common and widespread on lowlands and heaths and that it is rare on uplands. However these were found on a pond up on the moors which are quite high indeed.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	Black-darterbf.jpg
Views:	432
Size:	192.9 KB
ID:	30082  Click image for larger version

Name:	blackdarter2-copy.jpg
Views:	416
Size:	196.3 KB
ID:	30083  Click image for larger version

Name:	blackdarter3 copy.jpg
Views:	382
Size:	82.4 KB
ID:	30084  
__________________
Experience is the name everyone gives to their mistakes.

http://www.psiloswildlifephotography.co.uk
psilo is offline  
Reply With Quote

BF Supporter 2005 Support BirdForum With A Donation

Old Wednesday 14th September 2005, 23:43   #31
harry eales
Ancient Entomologist
 
harry eales's Avatar

 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Low Westwood, Durham. England.
Posts: 4,820
Quote:
Originally Posted by psilo
As Adey was kind enough to give me a positive id I thought that I would add my black darter (Sympetrum danae) photos here. These are quite a bit smaller than the common darter and when they fly they have the most beautiful blue wings. Being very dark though I found them very difficult to photograph. The literature says that they are common and widespread on lowlands and heaths and that it is rare on uplands. However these were found on a pond up on the moors which are quite high indeed.
Hello psilo,
I'm afraid the literature about Black Darter being an acidic pool loving species in either upland or lowland heaths is now quite incorrect.

It may have been true some ten years ago, but in the Northern counties of England it has expanded out of it's predominantly acidic water upland habitat and can now even be found in coastal low lying ponds many miles from any bogs or mire. It has even turned up as a breeding species in ponds on Magnesium Limestone which is about as none-acidic as you can get.

Harry
harry eales is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Friday 21st October 2005, 18:47   #32
Surreybirder
Ken Noble
 
Surreybirder's Avatar

 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Lingfield Surrey
Posts: 8,263
The male demoiselles are easy to tell apart (I'm talking in a UK context here) but the females are not always easy in isolation. The female beautiful has a 'dipped in tea' look. I'll try and show the differences:
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	beautiful_demoiselle_female.jpg
Views:	427
Size:	35.3 KB
ID:	32408  Click image for larger version

Name:	beautiful_demoiselle_immmale.jpg
Views:	413
Size:	30.8 KB
ID:	32409  Click image for larger version

Name:	banded_demoiselle_female.jpg
Views:	401
Size:	30.8 KB
ID:	32410  Click image for larger version

Name:	banded_demoiselle7.jpg
Views:	389
Size:	32.1 KB
ID:	32411  Click image for larger version

Name:	beautiful_demoiselle.jpg
Views:	390
Size:	37.9 KB
ID:	32412  

Surreybirder is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Sunday 5th March 2006, 03:12   #33
BugMan
Registered User

 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: PA
Posts: 6
Immature or Female Blue Coporal

This is the coloring of a Blue Corporal Dragonfly immature male or female. Since it was found around May it may likely be a male. The adults are .. well "blue" *wink*
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	bluecorporal008.jpg
Views:	387
Size:	85.9 KB
ID:	40650  
BugMan is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Saturday 11th March 2006, 18:51   #34
HarassedDad
Norfolk County Butterfly Recorder

 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Norwich, Norfolk
Posts: 977
Well I googled Blue Corporal and found this amazing site

http://public.fotki.com/gstrick3
What a brilliant resource.
HarassedDad is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Sunday 7th May 2006, 01:04   #35
Sue Wright
Registered User
 
Sue Wright's Avatar

 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: S. Somerset, England
Posts: 6,510
What a brilliant thread! I was delighted to see so much about them all as I find them all a little complicating to ID at times, to say the least, even with a good book.

I even put a Large Red Damsel (wrongly now I know) on the Butterfly & Moths thread on Friday.

This is all making for fascinating learning. Thank you all.

Sue
Sue Wright is offline  
Reply With Quote

BF Supporter 2007 Support BirdForum With A Donation

Old Friday 16th June 2006, 20:05   #36
digitalbirdy
Registered User

 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: UK
Posts: 230
Chaser or Skimmer !

This Dragonfly I photographed yesterday in Devon (UK), has Brown eyes but a blue back - so which is it, a Chaser or a Skimmer.

Please excuse me posting it in this thread, but as the photo came out quite well, I thought it could be useful for others regarding ID.

Adrian
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	dragonfly_15jun06_1117crp1_t450.jpg
Views:	409
Size:	66.7 KB
ID:	49143  
digitalbirdy is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Friday 16th June 2006, 20:14   #37
Ashton.P
Registered User
 
Ashton.P's Avatar

 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: East Yorkshire
Posts: 58
Adrian,

Immature male Broad-bodied Chaser.

Paul.
Ashton.P is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Thursday 24th August 2006, 00:14   #38
Adey Baker
Member
 
Adey Baker's Avatar

 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Hinckley, Leics
Posts: 4,954
Blue-tailed Damselflies are very common over much of the UK (only really confusable with Scarce Blue-tail - which I don't have any photos of for comparison!) but they come in a bewildering variety of colours.

Hopefully, I've got all the commonest forms labelled correctly below:

Pic 1: Males, immature on the left showing the bright green colour of the abdomen which turns through a blue/green turquoise colour into the blue male. Note the two-toned pterostigma.

Females are more variable, either called just A, B and C-types or various scientific names.

Pic 2: is a near-adult 'andromorph'-type female with colouring similar to the male with the inset showing the differences between the male and female appendages.

Pic 3: shows the two regular colours of immature females, the more or less self-explanatory violacea purple-coloured on the left and the pinkish rufescens on the right. Both show the whitish pterostigma and blue segment 8.

Pic 4: shows adult females which have now lost the blue 'tail' - the greenish form of infuscans on the left and rufescens-obsoleta on the right which, together with its immature rufescens form lacks the black line on the thorax.

Anybody got any Scarce Blue-tail photos to put on here?
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	bt-male-imm-ad-1.jpg
Views:	355
Size:	64.9 KB
ID:	56134  Click image for larger version

Name:	bt-fem-and-1.jpg
Views:	360
Size:	72.8 KB
ID:	56135  Click image for larger version

Name:	bt-fem-imm-1.jpg
Views:	345
Size:	61.2 KB
ID:	56136  Click image for larger version

Name:	bt-fem-ad-1.jpg
Views:	378
Size:	64.6 KB
ID:	56137  
Adey Baker is offline  
Reply With Quote

BF Supporter 2005 2006 2007 2009 Support BirdForum With A Donation

Old Thursday 24th August 2006, 20:19   #39
Stranger
Registered User

 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: somerset
Posts: 1,209
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevo
This is a brilliant thread,please keep the photo`s & ID pointers coming as a newcomer like me is finding some Odonata`s bewildering!!!!

Cheers Steve.
I`ll second that, (both the brilliant and the bewildering).
Stranger is offline  
Reply With Quote

BF Supporter 2007 Support BirdForum With A Donation

Old Monday 28th August 2006, 19:33   #40
brianfm
Botanical Birder
 
brianfm's Avatar

 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: newcastle upon tyne
Posts: 4,041
Blog Entries: 129
Brilliant stuff. I am a newcomer to all of this, but I am going to work through the thread slowly. Hope it keeps going.
__________________
Brian
Use the talents you possess - for the woods would be a very silent place if no birds sang except for the best.-- Henry Van Dyke http://killybirder.blogspot.com/
brianfm is offline  
Reply With Quote

BF Supporter 2007 2008 2009 Support BirdForum With A Donation

Old Thursday 26th April 2007, 10:12   #41
HarassedDad
Norfolk County Butterfly Recorder

 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Norwich, Norfolk
Posts: 977
Just a thought for the new season: If you would like to get an ID of exuvae found, the significant shots to photograph are:
1 A shot from directly above looking down (to see the spines on the sides and the anal protuberances)
2 A shot from the side (to see the spines that run down the middle of the back)
3 A shot of the underside showing the mask.(needed to distinguish the hawkers)
Nice to have would be a shot from the front showing the head and eye position.
HarassedDad is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Thursday 14th June 2007, 09:10   #42
Ashton.P
Registered User
 
Ashton.P's Avatar

 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: East Yorkshire
Posts: 58
Link to a composite photo showing the key differences between Variable, Azure and Common Blue Damelflies. In all species there can be some variability, and it's best to not solely rely on one identification feature.

http://www.erdragonflies.co.uk/id/bluedamselflies.htm
__________________
Paul Ashton
VC61 Recorder - British Dragonfly Society
Yorkshire Dragonfly Society
East Riding Dragonflies
Ashton.P is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Thursday 14th June 2007, 10:18   #43
Brian Stone
A Stone chatting
 
Brian Stone's Avatar

 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Peterborough, UK
Posts: 6,043
Useful resource Paul. There is a further feature separating Variable from Azure not mentioned. There is a thin blue bar joining the post-occular spots on the top of the head on Variable. Can be seen on this typical male.

It's a good point about the variability. The first one I saw at this site was far less conclusive with almost complete ante-humeral stripes and a very indistinct 'wine glass stem'. It's worth noting that Variable usually look more dainty and slender than Azure.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	variable_damsel_male_detail_12jun07_800p_20.jpg
Views:	307
Size:	84.8 KB
ID:	89378  
Brian Stone is offline  
Reply With Quote

BF Supporter 2005 2006 2007 2008 Support BirdForum With A Donation

Old Thursday 14th June 2007, 11:33   #44
Ashton.P
Registered User
 
Ashton.P's Avatar

 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: East Yorkshire
Posts: 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian Stone View Post
There is a further feature separating Variable from Azure not mentioned. There is a thin blue bar joining the post-occular spots on the top of the head on Variable.
Is this reliable?
A quick look at photographs in 'Smallshire and Swash' would indicate that this isn't the case. Some of the male Variables don't have this mark and some are reduce to two faint spots, rather than a bar. A photograph of a male Azure has two faint spots, and a female has a full bar present.

There is variability, and extreme variations can occur in most species. The key its to not rely on one feature alone, but base the identification on at least two. Even the whisky tumbler mark on an Azure can sometimes have a stalk, which means you need to be able to fall back on the crown markings on segment 9.

Another downfall can be complacency. For example at Tophill Low in East Yorkshire, Azure peaks earlier than Common Blue. When Azure starts to become less noticeable and Common Blue starts to peak, many observers continue to log Azure as the most abundant species and have not noticed the shift change. This also happens with the different habitat preferences on the same site. Azure prefers the northern end of the site, and Common Blue the southern end, once you are familiar with this, it really becomes apparent how inaccurately recorded these two species can be.

I've also added a composite photograph of male hawker at the following link:-

http://www.erdragonflies.co.uk/id/malehawkers.htm
__________________
Paul Ashton
VC61 Recorder - British Dragonfly Society
Yorkshire Dragonfly Society
East Riding Dragonflies
Ashton.P is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Thursday 14th June 2007, 11:54   #45
Brian Stone
A Stone chatting
 
Brian Stone's Avatar

 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Peterborough, UK
Posts: 6,043
You are probably correct. I have a feeling this is more reliable in females.
Brian Stone is offline  
Reply With Quote

BF Supporter 2005 2006 2007 2008 Support BirdForum With A Donation

Old Friday 22nd June 2007, 17:13   #46
Seamoor
Registered User

 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: IVYBRIDGE, DEVON
Posts: 200
Dragonflys we have had at pond

Hi

In a small 8 x 6 pond so far this year we have 8 dragon fly emerge, At the moment we have two which are still on the iris leaves, I think this is dure to all the rain we have had, one has been there 4 days and the other 2.
Seamoor is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Friday 22nd June 2007, 22:22   #47
harry eales
Ancient Entomologist
 
harry eales's Avatar

 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Low Westwood, Durham. England.
Posts: 4,820
Quote:
Originally Posted by Seamoor View Post
Hi

In a small 8 x 6 pond so far this year we have 8 dragon fly emerge, At the moment we have two which are still on the iris leaves, I think this is dure to all the rain we have had, one has been there 4 days and the other 2.
Hello Seamoor,

Are these adult Dragonflies resting, or are they just the cast nymphal skins your seeing. These stay on the emergence post or position until either the wind or rain wash them off.

Harry
__________________
You should never believe all the information provided on the Internet. Abraham Lincoln. Circa 1863.
harry eales is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Tuesday 26th June 2007, 22:30   #48
Binocularface
You've all got one...............!
 
Binocularface's Avatar

 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Wigton, Cumbria
Posts: 2,185
Scarce Blue-tailed Damselfly

Quote:
Originally Posted by Adey Baker View Post
Anybody got any Scarce Blue-tail photos to put on here?
Sorry Adey - Not very spectacular I am afraid!
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	Scarce-blue-Tail1.jpg
Views:	324
Size:	85.9 KB
ID:	91260  Click image for larger version

Name:	Scarce-blue-Tail2.jpg
Views:	282
Size:	100.0 KB
ID:	91262  Click image for larger version

Name:	Scarce-blue-Tail3.jpg
Views:	279
Size:	90.9 KB
ID:	91263  Click image for larger version

Name:	Scarce-blue-Tail4.jpg
Views:	278
Size:	80.4 KB
ID:	91264  
__________________
I'm giving my right arm to raise funds to help save Turkey's biodiversity. Find out more here
You can make a donation here
Follow my progress on twitter @givemyrightarm
Binocularface is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Tuesday 26th June 2007, 22:51   #49
Binocularface
You've all got one...............!
 
Binocularface's Avatar

 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Wigton, Cumbria
Posts: 2,185
Northern Damselfly

Here are some Northern Damselfly pics to add to the thread.

Key ID points for males:
  • Underside of eyes and thorax are bright green
  • 'spade' shaped marking on segment 2 - though this can be variable
  • 2 short black lines on side of thorax
  • The anal appendages are diagnostic in the male - though not really identifiable in the images attached!
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	Northern-Damselfly.jpg
Views:	284
Size:	83.2 KB
ID:	91267  Click image for larger version

Name:	Northern-Damselfly2.jpg
Views:	285
Size:	79.6 KB
ID:	91268  Click image for larger version

Name:	Northern-Damselfly3.jpg
Views:	255
Size:	83.2 KB
ID:	91269  Click image for larger version

Name:	Northern-Damselfly4.jpg
Views:	255
Size:	90.0 KB
ID:	91270  Click image for larger version

Name:	Northern-Damselfly5.jpg
Views:	298
Size:	95.4 KB
ID:	91271  

__________________
I'm giving my right arm to raise funds to help save Turkey's biodiversity. Find out more here
You can make a donation here
Follow my progress on twitter @givemyrightarm

Last edited by Binocularface : Tuesday 26th June 2007 at 23:09.
Binocularface is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Tuesday 26th June 2007, 23:08   #50
Binocularface
You've all got one...............!
 
Binocularface's Avatar

 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Wigton, Cumbria
Posts: 2,185
Irish Damselfly

And some Irish Damselfly...................

Key ID Points for males:
  • Dark in general appearance with black segments interspersed with thin areas of blue - segments 8 & 9 are predominantly blue
  • Green colouration on underside of eye, side of thorax
  • Crescent shape on segment 2 - though some variability on this feature
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	Irish-Damselfly (4).jpg
Views:	268
Size:	24.6 KB
ID:	91275  Click image for larger version

Name:	Irish-Damselfly (5).jpg
Views:	253
Size:	28.0 KB
ID:	91276  Click image for larger version

Name:	Irish-Damselfly (9).jpg
Views:	263
Size:	22.7 KB
ID:	91277  Click image for larger version

Name:	Irish-Damselfly (12).jpg
Views:	266
Size:	25.0 KB
ID:	91278  Click image for larger version

Name:	Irish-Damselfly (15).jpg
Views:	256
Size:	24.1 KB
ID:	91279  

__________________
I'm giving my right arm to raise funds to help save Turkey's biodiversity. Find out more here
You can make a donation here
Follow my progress on twitter @givemyrightarm
Binocularface is offline  
Reply With Quote
Advertisement
Reply


Thread Tools
Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Dragonfly ID herring99 Insects, Dragonflies, Arachnids, Beetles & More 5 Thursday 28th July 2005 22:33
Dragonfly larva Lorne Insects, Dragonflies, Arachnids, Beetles & More 12 Wednesday 30th March 2005 18:48
Late Dragonfly Gerry Hooper Insects, Dragonflies, Arachnids, Beetles & More 15 Sunday 12th December 2004 21:48
Dragonfly Behaviour Fuchsia Insects, Dragonflies, Arachnids, Beetles & More 6 Thursday 9th September 2004 20:37
ID? Dragonfly & Beetle tpanc13 Insects, Dragonflies, Arachnids, Beetles & More 0 Monday 28th June 2004 18:45

{googleads}

Fatbirder's Top 1000 Birding Websites

Help support BirdForum

Page generated in 0.21838307 seconds with 36 queries
All times are GMT. The time now is 00:56.