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Moth ID help, Scotland

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Old Thursday 17th May 2018, 17:18   #1
thomasclark1985
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Moth ID help, Scotland

Hi,

Last week I tried out my homemade moth trap for the first time, whilst away in Scotland. Armed with my moth guide I managed to ID just a few of them, (which took hours thumbing through the pages, from front to back repeatedly as I am a total beginner!) and there were many I couldn't ID, so can anyone help with these please?

Cheers,

Tom
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Old Thursday 17th May 2018, 18:43   #2
andyadcock
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1 Is a Red-green Carpet I think
2 Water Carpet
3 Engrailed I think



A

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Old Thursday 17th May 2018, 20:39   #3
renopaul
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4 Autumn Green Carpet.
5 Early Tooth-striped maybe?

Cheers
Paul
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Old Thursday 17th May 2018, 21:50   #4
thomasclark1985
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Thanks guys.

Just another question, when trying to attach some photo's I have difficulty trying to keep within the dimension limits. Most photos I can crop which solves it, but others are already too zoomed in that cropping means I lose half of the photo, is there a quick/easy way of solving this?
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Old Friday 18th May 2018, 07:45   #5
andyadcock
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Use this site, very easy, when it comes to the choice 'resize your picture' choose 'fit to screen 800 resolution'

http://www.picresize.com/



A

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Old Friday 18th May 2018, 10:03   #6
thomasclark1985
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A few more

Thanks Andy, that's sorted it. Here are a few more. Am I right on any of these?

1) Lead-coloured drab
2) Brown silver-line
3) Streamer
4) Grey birch
5) Engrailed, again.

Cheers,

Tom
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Old Friday 18th May 2018, 10:29   #7
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Nailed em all mate, talented beginner!

The Drab is a tricky one but the rounded corners to the wing rather than slightly pointed, support LcD rather than Clouded I think, however, I still think that there's a chance that someone will tell us we're wrong, something is niggling about this one?




A

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Old Friday 18th May 2018, 11:52   #8
thomasclark1985
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Cheers mate, I'll hold back on the ID then! The drabs/quakers/darts all look difficult from my first proper look through the guide, I think I started out with about 6 species I thought It looked like! I could really get into moth'ing, it's just difficult without a decent garden to get trapping practice in.

Cheers,

Tom
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Old Friday 18th May 2018, 12:09   #9
lee_hesp
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Not sure about the Drab. Clouded is much commoner in Scotland. Use this site to see if there are any records from where you were catching http://www.mothrecording.org/index.p...&mm=spinfo_all

Cheers,

Lee
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Old Friday 18th May 2018, 12:21   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lee_hesp View Post
Not sure about the Drab. Clouded is much commoner in Scotland. Use this site to see if there are any records from where you were catching http://www.mothrecording.org/index.p...&mm=spinfo_all

Cheers,

Lee
The wing tip shape supports LcD as I said, quite rounded but agree with your comments obviously, Clouded is much the commoner everywhere I think.



A
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Old Friday 18th May 2018, 12:38   #11
thomasclark1985
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Thanks Lee. The location was Kentallen, not far from Fort William, it shows no records for the LcD but Clouded have been recorded nearby.

Cheers,

Tom
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Old Friday 18th May 2018, 12:52   #12
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...and just because there are no previous records doesn't rule out that it isn't one :-)

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Lee
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Old Friday 18th May 2018, 12:56   #13
thomasclark1985
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One more!

Here is another photo, I was going with Common Quaker for the one on the left, and for the right I have no idea, another drab maybe?

Don't worry this is the last one!

Cheers,

Tom
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Old Friday 18th May 2018, 13:48   #14
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Common Quaker is correct,
wondering about a very dark, Rustic Shoulder-knot for the other, there aren't that many species that show a half dark kidney mark?


A

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Old Friday 18th May 2018, 14:58   #15
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As I've mentioned previously on many websites, etc., there are some basic structural features that can help in the elimination process when trying to identify moths belonging to the main subfamilies of the Noctuidae. Most can be seen with a 10x hand lens but it's sometimes easier with a binocular microscope.
The terminology is somewhat 'old school' - but it really does help.
Noctuinae: spined hind tibiae ('back legs') - don't confuse these with the spurs that most noctuids have at the junction between the various sections of the legs. They are chitinous spines poking through the scales on the hind tiniae.
Hadeninae: eyes are hairy when viewed obliquely.
Cuculliinae: eyes are 'lashed' (they have long cilia overhanging the upper part of the eye)
Amphipyrinae: none of the above but with large globular eyes.
Using the above one can eliminate the majority of the possible species and concentrate on the 'right' subfamily.
Martin
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Old Friday 18th May 2018, 20:24   #16
thomasclark1985
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Thanks for the advice Martin. I’ll take note for the next time I have the trap out.
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