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+ Some Bonus Birds of Fanny, Edward Wilson and Mr. & Mrs. Parzudaki!

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Old Sunday 18th May 2014, 14:40   #1
Calalp
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+ Some Bonus Birds of Fanny, Edward Wilson and Mr. & Mrs. Parzudaki!

In solving the thread The mysterious Monsieur Longuemare in Longuemare's Sunangel (here) … I think!? we´ve might, maybe, actually happened to solve some other little-known, more or less, mysterious eponyms!

● Purple-collared Woodstar Myrtis fanny LESSON 1838 as "Ornismya Fanny" a k a "Fanny's Woodstar"
Following Laurent's translation (in the above mentioned thread, Post No. #4), Lesson wrote: "We give to these birds, of which we don't know the homeland, the name of Mrs. Fanny gorge de Longuemares [sic], whose husband possesses unquestionably the best prepared collection of hummingbirds, and to whom we are attached by the bonds of an old friendship."
= the wife of Mr. Gouÿe de Longuemare: Madame "Fanny" Gouÿe de Longuemare, whose full (married) name was Françoise Victoire Rosalie Joséphine Gouÿe de Longuemare (1796–1873) born Marsy. "Fanny" is a diminutive of Françoise.

Not to be confused with the "Fanny" behind the following Birds:
● the sub-specis Tangara larvata fanny LAFRESNAYE 1847 as "Aglaia Fanny": "Cete jolie espèce, à laquelle nous donnons le nom lʼépouse de M. Wilson, …"
● Green-crowned Woodnymph Thalurania (hypochlora/colombica) fannyi (somethimes written fannyae*) DELATTRE & BOURCIER 1846 as "Trochilus Fannyi": "Dedié à madame Fanny, épóuse de M. Wilson, que nous avons cité." *As in for example: Zoonomen
= Francis "Fanny" Wilson (xxxxxxxx), wife of the collector (and patron of Natural History) Mr. Edward Wilson (1808–1888) – who himself is commemorated in Amazilia edward DELATTRE & BOURCIER 1846 [See thread Some tricky Edwards's and/or Edward's Birds … Part II , Post #13].

The latter, Edward Wilson (18081888), is also, still today, remembered in the Common name of:
● Wilson’s Bird-of-Paradise Cicinnurus respublica BONAPARTE 1850, that is "left-overs" of the Synonymous "Paradisea Wilsonii” CASSIN 1852: ”This very handsome Paradise bird is one of the most valuable and interesting of the many contributions to the collection of this Academy, made by Mr. Edward Wilson, of Lydstip house, Pembrokeshire, to whom I have taken the liberty of dedicating it, as a slight acknowledgement of his valuable services to the cause of the zoological sciences in this country.” See link (here)

But that´s not all …

clarisse in …
● Longuemare's Sunangel Heliangelus (amethysticollis) clarisse LONGUEMARE 1841: "Dédié à madame Parzudaki." (here)
= most likely the almost totally unknown Frenchwoman, wife of the collector Charles Parzudaki (below, whom she married 19 August 1837, in Paris): Clarisse Parzudaki (1807–1884), born Moreuil. Born 6 mars 1807 (in Nointel, 60, Oise, Picardie, France) … who died 22 October 1884, in exactly the same place – at the age of 77.

and:

parzudakii in …
● Flame-faced Tanager Tangara parzudakii LAFRESNAYE 1843: "Nous avons dédié cette belle espèces au naturaliste Parzudaki, lequel par suite de nombreux envois reçus de Colombie, a contribué fortement à faire connaître lʼornithologie si remarquable de cette partie de lʼAmérique du sud." (here)
= probabably the Cretan-French collector Charles Parzudaki (1806–1889), who collected Birds, Amphibians and Mammals (as well as other Naturalia), in Colombia 1841–1845 and in Brazil 1846). Born 7 May 1806 in Canée (Chania), Crete, Greece … who died 30 December 1889 in the same place as his wife (above, in their home?) in Picardie, France – at the age of 83.

The latter not to be confused (I think? Laurent?) with Émile Parzudaki, a Paris dealer in natural-history specimens, in the 1850's. Exactly how they were related I haven´t figured out, maybe this link makes it more understandable? (here)

That´s it!

-----------------------------------------------------------------------
If no-one proves me wrong: Not a bad result for some pure "side-tracks"!?

Last edited by Calalp : Sunday 18th May 2014 at 16:32. Reason: typo, quote & link
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Old Sunday 18th May 2014, 16:55   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Calalp View Post
The latter not to be confused (I think? Laurent?) with Émile Parzudaki, a Paris dealer in natural-history specimens, in the 1850's. Though if they were related in any way I do not know.
Here I find a reference from 1851, to a M. Parzudaki, Charles, residing in Paris, rue du Bouloi, 2,
...and...
Here is a book from 1856 by a M. Émile Parzudaki, residing in Paris, rue du Bouloi, 2.
If they lived in the same house, it's probably not an option to assume that they were unrelated.

See also this: in 1857, there were two Parzudakis--(Ch.), "naturalist", and (E.), "naturalist preparator"--, rue du Bouloi, 2.

Hamonville, 1891, wrote:
Quote:
Ce dernier oeuf a été acquis à la fin de l'année 1855 chez M. Parzudacki père, naturaliste à Paris, par le baron de Vèze, chez qui je le vis; il l'avait payé 500 fr. Comme M. Parzudacki fils a cessé le commerce de son père, il ne m'a pas été possible de savoir la provenance de cet échantillon.
"This last egg was acquired at the end of the year 1855 from Mr. Parzudacki-father, naturalist in Paris, by the Baron de Vèze, at whose home I saw it; he had paid 500 fr. for it. As Mr. Parzudacki-son has ceased his father's trade, it has not been possible for me to know the origin of this sample."

This suggests two Parzudakis, who were father and son; the son continued his father's trade for a time, but had ceased it by 1891.

Charles Parzudaki seemingly only had a daughter. (If the info about him in this genealogy is complete--he actually seems rather peripheral to the studied family.) OTOH, Clarisse Moreuil had an 8-years-old son from a first marriage whe she married him, named François Charles Émile, who apparently later took the name of his father-in-law...?

Last edited by l_raty : Sunday 18th May 2014 at 21:18.
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Old Monday 19th May 2014, 08:43   #3
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What I do know is that Emile Parzudaki was part of the crew of the Venus that sailed the world between 29 December 1836 and 26 June 1839. The expedition's main naturalist was Adolphe Simon Neboux and Abel du Petit-Thouars and Parzudaki was their assistant, as far as I can see now.
Parzudaki purchased many collections, when back in Paris. Including the collections from Prince Victor Massena, Charles Souance and Justin Goudot.

The egg from Laurent above is the egg of a Great Auk!
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Old Monday 19th May 2014, 09:04   #4
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Justin,
Do you have a reliable source saying this was, indeed, Émile, not Charles?
Lots of confusion everywhere as far as I can see. There are clearly two men involved, but many contemporary sources just write "M. Parzudaki", making it hard to know who is meant. Many modern sources seemingly do not distinguish between them at all. See eg. this letter, supposedly written by Émile, but clearly signed "Ch. Parzudaki".
Bonaparte called Émile Parzudaki a "young travelling naturalist" in 1855. If he was already part of the crew of the Venus almost 20 years earlier, he was presumably not really "young" at this time.


EDIT - I can't find any Parzudaki on the Rôle de l'équipage de la frégate La Vénus published by Abel du Petit-Thouars.
Also, Palmer (1918) says that "Parzudaki" (no first name) "handled the type specimen" of Ornismya costae Bourcier "upon its arrival in Paris". This specimen was collected during the voyage of La Vénus. This would seem to indicate that he was not on the ship.

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Old Monday 19th May 2014, 10:51   #5
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Thumbs up Well noted, Justin!

Quote:
Originally Posted by JustinJansen View Post
What I do know is that Emile Parzudaki was part of the crew of the Venus that sailed the world between 29 December 1836 and 26 June 1839. The expedition's main naturalist was Adolphe Simon Neboux and Abel du Petit-Thouars and Parzudaki was their assistant, as far as I can see now.
Parzudaki purchased many collections, when back in Paris. Including the collections from Prince Victor Massena, Charles Souance and Justin Goudot.
If "Emile" really participated in the Venus voyage 1836-1839 it´s not very likely that he is equivalent of any "step-son" of Charles (as that "Émile" [i. e. François Charles Émile Fauqueux-Parzudaki] was born in 1829)!

Maybe Charles and Emile was Cretan brothers!? That could explain why he is so hard to trace! Those Greeks and their Greek alphabet is both difficult to find and read!

It does look like, at least I get a feeling, that Charles Parzudaki, togeher with "Émile" (whoever he was) and possibly whith his step-son(s) [there seem to be yet another "François Charles Étienne Fauqueux-Parzudaki" also titled "Naturaliste"], ran a firm, a "Maison Parzudaki", trading in natural specimens … something like the "Maison Verreaux" of the Father and Sons Verreaux (but in a minor scale). A firm that had "ceased ... by 1891" after Charles's death in 1889.

However; due to lack of time I will not go any further in this matter. Even Charles Parzudaki was a side-track of mine, and "Émile" is way off the chart of what I "have to do". There are just too many birds, too many etymologies, higher up on my list, waiting to be solved.

If anyone else feel like trying to trace the Parzudaki's … Good luck!

Last edited by Calalp : Monday 19th May 2014 at 11:17. Reason: clearification
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Old Monday 19th May 2014, 11:20   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Calalp View Post
there seem to be yet another "François Charles Étienne Fauqueux-Parzudaki" also titled "Naturaliste"
See here: born in Nointel in 1829; changed his name from Fauqueux to Fauqueux-Parzudaki in 1858. It's not another person, it is Clarisse's son, Charles' step-son, but with a different third first name. (Doesn't make things clearer, though...)
One of the problems may be the incompleteness of the genealogy that we found on the web. It seems it is Clarisse who was related to the family under study; he stands in the tree merely as her husband. He married her while she was a widow and already had a son. Maybe he was in a similar situation?
In any case, Hamonville clearly alludes to a father and a son. If you look here, you'll see a "Parzudaki, Bouloi, 2" from 1843 to 1856; two Parzudakis, Ch. and E., on the same address in 1857, and only E. or Emile after this. Thus it seems clear that Emile took over the job of Charles. And in 1855, Bonaparte (just 3 years older than Charles) found Emile "young".

Macropygia emiliana is not on your list either?
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Old Monday 19th May 2014, 12:38   #7
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Thumbs up Lost in Translation

Yes. I know Laurent, I agree that Charles and "Émile" are different persons, that´s seemed obvious for a while, the last matter was trying to understand who the step-son/s where, and in trying to trace him/them, I saw that one … and this one; Collection complète des lois, décrets d'intérêt général, traités ..., Volym 57 alt. this one Bulletin des lois de la République française or this one!?

I don´t say what is what, what is wrong or fault, the only thing I know is, due to this confusion, and my (by this time well-known) lack of linguistic skills, that I cannot neither help nor go any further. I´m at the end of the (my) way. It´ll be up to you guys knowing French solving this one. Sorry.

But I sure appreciate the way you scrutinize any possible errors. Let´s see what Justin can deliver!

Keep up the good work!

Björn

PS. And, no. The Ruddy Cuckoo-Dove Macropygia (amboinensis/phasianella/tenuirostris) emiliana BONAPARTE 1854 is not on my list. In Swedish it´s called "Rostgökduva" (in accordance with its Common English name) leaving it way, way "off chart".

Last edited by Calalp : Monday 19th May 2014 at 13:08. Reason: Deleting erroneous PPS!
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Old Monday 19th May 2014, 12:52   #8
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The dedication is to the "young travelling naturalist", Émile Parzudaki--link to Bonaparte's text in Post #4 above.
"Emil-" + Latin adjectival suffix -ianus, -a, -um; feminine because it agrees in gender with Macropygia.

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Old Monday 19th May 2014, 13:06   #9
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Thumbs up You are the linguistic King!

I´ve deleted that sudden, awkward PPS! You see ... this is too tricky, much to tricky for me! I couldn´t even understand that!

That´s how it goes, when trying to be clever, and quick, being simply stupid, not even starting to check established sources.

Jobling (2010) agrees with you! As do I.

I´ll try to keep my fingers away from this one in the future!

Last edited by Calalp : Monday 19th May 2014 at 13:40. Reason: grammar
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Old Monday 19th May 2014, 13:51   #10
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(OK, I've deleted my ref to the PPS too Should have waited a bit before answering, sorry.)

My feeling, FWIW, is that the easiest solution to these confused matters would be that "Émile Parzudaki" was indeed the step-son, born in 1829. (And that the document that calls him "F. C. Étienne" is simply mistaken: you found us three documents that clearly refer to the same event, but call him "F. C. Émile".) I think that in the years preceding the retirement of his step-father, he may have travelled and collected specimens, that he sent to Charles in Paris. He then came back to Paris and, when his father retired, took his succession. Although officially named Fauqueux, he probably used his step-father's name in the everyday life. He officially had "-Parzudaki" added to his name in 1858: this coincides with him taking over the "Maison Parzudaki"--which makes some sense to me.

OK, I'll stop on this one for now too.

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Old Monday 19th May 2014, 15:17   #11
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Mixed up some things, as correctly pointed out by Laurent. Emile or Charles travelled in Colombia between 1841 and 1845. And I link them to specimens from the Venus due to exchanges made by either one of them. Source of the former is Beolens & Watkins 2003.
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Old Wednesday 1st April 2015, 11:00   #12
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One again....

I have to come back on this thread.

First we have Charles Parzudaki. Here he was born
  • Born 7 May 1806 - La Canée,GRÈCE (CRÈTE)
  • Deceased 30 December 1889 - Nointel,60, Oise,Picardie,FRANCE , age at death: 83 years old

Second we have Clarisse Moreuil.

  • Born 6 March 1807 - Nointel,60,Oise,Picardie,FRANCE
  • Deceased 22 October 1884 - Nointel,60,Oise,Picardie,FRANCE , age at death: 77 years old

She married first François Napoléon Fauqueux
  • Born 16 January 1806 - St-Aubin-sous-Erquery,60,Oise,Picardie,FRANCE
  • Deceased 24 September 1833 - Paris,75,Seine,Île-de-France,FRANCE , age at death: 27 years old

From the first marriage François Charles Émile Fauqueux-Parzudaki derived.
  • Born 28 May 1829 - Nointel,60,Oise,Picardie,FRANCE
  • Deceased 21 March 1899 - Paris 12,75012,Seine,Île-de-France,FRANCE , age at death: 69 years old

Second marriage 19 August 1837 , Paris,75,Seine,Île-de-France,FRANCE, to Charles Parzudaki 1806-1889.

I think there is now doubt that Charles described Manacus candei here and Iodopleura isabellae here. Therefore I have no doubt that he described as well Oxypogon lindenii here. One more here and here.

François Charles Émile Fauqueux-Parzudaki published only catalogues like here and here. If he really published Catalogue de Trochilidés as mentionen in The Ibis, I don't know.

From all this descriptions etc. I do not see that any Parzudaki travelled. Even here it is just mentioned Collection Parzudaki, the same as here where a marchant is mentioned. And a naturalist is not necassarily a voyageur.

The first description of Charles mentioned F. de Maussion Candé as collector, the second découverte dans la province de Merida (république de Venezuela) par M. Linden, and the third Cette intéressante espèce a été tuée en 1846 à Rio-Negro, république de Venezuela, par M. Eugène Thiron, voyageur distingué....

So there is no evidence for me that they travelled themselves to Colombia. As already discussed Émile would be very young at that time. But maybe I missed a piece.

One more in The Eponym Dictionary of Birds is written: Émile collected with Auguste Sallé in Mexico. I personally think this is nonsense. It is just the catalogue he created about birds of Mexico together with Sallé. I think a couple of things are wrong about Emile in The Eponym Dictionary of Birds.

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Old Tuesday 23rd June 2015, 09:45   #13
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Somehow one of the Parzudaki was as well in Catalogue de la magnifique collection d'oiseaux de M. le Prince d'Essling, duc de rivoli : dont la vente aura lieu aux enchères publiques dans sa galerie, rue de lille. 98, le 8 Juin 1846 jusqu'au 25 du mème mois et jours suivants, s'il y a lieu, a midi précis involved as we can read here:

Quote:
Le catalogue se distribue chez M.M. Canivet, rue Saint-Thomas-du-Louvre, 24; et Parzudaki, rue du Bouloi, 2, qui se chargeront des commissions des personnes qui ne pourraient pas assister à la vente.
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Old Friday 20th May 2016, 08:42   #14
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Edward Wilson

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Originally Posted by Calalp View Post
The latter, Edward Wilson (18081888), is also, still today, remembered in the Common name of:
● Wilson’s Bird-of-Paradise Cicinnurus respublica BONAPARTE 1850, that is "left-overs" of the Synonymous "Paradisea Wilsonii” CASSIN 1852: ”This very handsome Paradise bird is one of the most valuable and interesting of the many contributions to the collection of this Academy, made by Mr. Edward Wilson, of Lydstip house, Pembrokeshire, to whom I have taken the liberty of dedicating it, as a slight acknowledgement of his valuable services to the cause of the zoological sciences in this country.” See link (here)
I have to come back on this as I am a little bit confused about this gentleman and his brother Thomas Bellerby Wilson also mentioned in HBW Alive.

1) There is as well a Aglaia wilsoni here for Edward Wilson. If I follow here it seems to be a synonym for Tangara nigrocincta. The dedication is to him as Fanny also mentioned in this thread and in the same article from Lafresnaye was his wife.
2) I was not able to find the syn. Craspedophora magnifica for his brother Thomas Bellerby Wilson as mentioned in HBW Alive. Maybe the same as syn. Diphyllodes respublica? Or where and who described Craspedophora wilsonia / wilsoniana / wilsonianus / wilsonii / wilsonius ?
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Old Friday 20th May 2016, 09:26   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Taphrospilus View Post
2) I was not able to find the syn. Craspedophora magnifica for his brother Thomas Bellerby Wilson as mentioned in HBW Alive. Maybe the same as syn. Diphyllodes respublica? Or where and who described Craspedophora wilsonia / wilsoniana / wilsonianus / wilsonii / wilsonius ?
Ptiloris wilsonii Ogden 1876 [OD] [plate].
Dedication explicit: "in honor of the donor and esteemed naturalist, Dr. T. B. Wilson".

The description was apparently based on a composite holotype -- the legs were that of another bird, and had been added to the specimen, which presumably lacked them; see [here].

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Old Friday 20th May 2016, 09:54   #16
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Thank you for this explanation. As usual
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Old Wednesday 15th June 2016, 06:20   #17
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Not sure if this has been mentioned in another thread but there is an article about Charles and Emile Parzudaki in Archives of natural history April 2016:
http://www.euppublishing.com/doi/abs...ournalCode=anh .
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Old Wednesday 15th June 2016, 15:05   #18
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Not sure if this has been mentioned in another thread but there is an article about Charles and Emile Parzudaki in Archives of natural history April 2016:
http://www.euppublishing.com/doi/abs...ournalCode=anh .
Thank's for this information. They came to same conclusion as in my thread #12 that they never traveled and all the dates about Charles and Émile.

And Emilia here...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Taphrospilus View Post
I am not sure if the entry HBW Alive on Emilia is correct. If I am correct both Genre Emilia, Émilie are for a female. So how did you come to this conclusion? And as there is no dedication for François Charles Émile Fauqueux-Parzudaki I have some doubts, that he is the woman. Anyway he died 21. March 1899 in Paris. But maybe I missed an important fact.
... is in question too as they wrote:

Quote:
Beolens et al. (2014: 175) stated that the (obsolete) genus Emilia Mulsant, Verreaux and Verreaux, 1866, was named after Emile Parzudaki. Along with Jobling37 we could not find any evidence in the original work (Mulsant et al. 1866: 185) that this genus was named after Emile Parzudaki.
P.S. I am impressed how accurate they researched on both persons e.g name change from Emil to Emile etc.

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Old Wednesday 15th June 2016, 16:49   #19
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I see no real evidence that Charles travelled either. But, if Émile did not travel at all, then we have here a legend that started as early as 1854, when Bonaparte described Macropygia emiliana, calling Émile Parzudaki explicitly "un jeune naturaliste voyageur [...] qui nous l'a fait remarquer" [here].
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Old Wednesday 15th June 2016, 22:38   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by l_raty View Post
"un jeune naturaliste voyageur [...].
Correct and I have seen that as well but

1) Bonaparte did not mention where he travelled. May indicate he did not know Emile at all.
2) There seems to be no other evidence that he travelled and collected according the article and Macropygia emiliana is part of the publication as well.
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Old Wednesday 15th June 2016, 22:43   #21
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The Museum national D'Histoire natural cite Emile P. as collector of the type of this bird and one from the Philippines and one from Brazil etc.
https://science.mnhn.fr/all/list?rec...udaki,%20Emile . But that is not what Bonaparte said. He said merely that Emile P. was a naturalist and voyageur. The Museums paraphernalia state that M. emiliana was acquired from Mr. Parzudaki, and one other says it was from Mr. Parzudaki's collection. Does the use of Voyageur mean going around the world? Or maybe Emile went to Greece or Spain?
https://science.mnhn.fr/institution/...=2&listCount=8 .
I would have more to say but BHL is down.
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Old Thursday 16th June 2016, 08:11   #22
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Christophe Gouraud et al (2016) discussed as well the possible misinterpretations of bird labels in the museums. Emile was more a business man than a scientist as he produced only catalogues to sell natural history specimen. It looks like a family Peters bought the natural history store of Parzudaki (but not 100% confirmed if I read Christophe Gouraud et al (2016) correctly). Emile went into a different business as there is written:

Quote:
In August 1874, following the death of his uncle, Philippe Latour, Emile took over the management of Maison Philippe Latour (Baras 1881: 288), a factory producing shoes.
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Old Friday 17th June 2016, 09:04   #23
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Clarisse's Sunangel

Gouraud, Chevrier & Mearns (2016) also confirms what I (in Post #1) and Martin (in Post #12) claimed … regarding the Eponym:

Heliangelus (amethysticollis) clarisse LONGUEMARE 1841

= Clarisse Parzudaki née Moreuil (1807–1884), wife of French naturalist Charles Parzudaki (1806–1889)


---

Last edited by Calalp : Friday 17th June 2016 at 09:07. Reason: title
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Old Saturday 18th June 2016, 08:52   #24
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Björn Bergenholtz
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Taphrospilus View Post
[…]
... I do not see that any Parzudaki travelled. …
[…]
So there is no evidence for me that they travelled themselves to Colombia. As already discussed Émile would be very young at that time.
[…]
Quote:
Originally Posted by l_raty View Post
I see no real evidence that Charles travelled either. But, if Émile did not travel at all, then we have here a legend that started as early as 1854, when Bonaparte described Macropygia emiliana, calling Émile Parzudaki explicitly "un jeune naturaliste voyageur [...] qui nous l'a fait remarquer" [here].
Could it be as simple as Bonaparte in 1854 meant that the "young" Emile Parzudaki (when those words was written he was 25 years old) also could have travelled repeatedly (as we know Charles did), not very long-distance, but back and forth, between Paris and London (i.e. the British Museum) …?

However; what about these claims (not necessarily of birds, but as well of other animals): here, here, here or here … ? Are they all (as indicated by Gouraud et al) simply erroneous?

According to the correspondence (briefly mentioned by Gouraud et al, p.82) kept in the Archives of NHM, one or both, (Émile or Charles) Parzudaki had the following addresses during the years 1840-1850: "Paris, France" and "Algeria" as well as "Panama" (here) … !?

And what about this NHM entry; here, claiming that "E. Parzudaki" collected the Type of today's Hemithraupis flavicollis albigularis SCLATER 1855 (here, and Plate, here) as "Nemosia albigularis" … "from Santa Fe, Bogota" (However not mentioned in the OD). If true? I don´t know. I assume this is yet another of those "Bogota-skins" purchased, fixed, re-freshed, sold and delivered (but not collected) by the Parzudaki firm.

If Christophe Gouraud, Laurent Chevrier & Richard Mearns (2016) are correct (and it sure looks that way) several caretakers of various collections in Museums and other institutions now have a massive task of updating their archives, labels, decades of compilations, long registers and even longer lists of suppliers, donors, collectors etc. etc. … and, hopefully also their home-pages.

However note that they in the ending part of this article leaves it open that Emile Parzudaki might have traveled to Egypt in 1860 …? This, of course, impossible for Bonaparte to know six years earlier.

I get the feeling there are a few gaps remaining to get the full picture. In any case I assume the last parts will remain unknown, considering the apparent amount of work and time that Gouraud, Chevrier & Mearns have spent on this matter. It sure looks like they have followed the track as far as possible.
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Old Saturday 18th June 2016, 22:14   #25
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Parzudaki Summary

Following the Paper of Gouraud, Chevrier & Mearns (2016) also gives us (alt. confirms):

● the invalid "Ornismya parzudhaki" LESSON 1838 (recte 1839) [Syn. (Ornismya) Chlorostilbon ricordii GERVAIS 1835]
● the invalid "Ornismya parzudaki" LESSON 1840 [Syn. (Ornismya) Chlorostilbon ricordii FRASER 1840]
● today's Flame-faced Tanager Tangara parzudakii DE LAFRESNAYE 1843 as "Tanagra parzudakii"
= Charles Parzudaki (1806–1889), Cretian-born, French Dealer in Natural History Specimens … etc. etc.

● the Generic name Parzudakia REICHENBACH 1854
= either one, or both, of Charles Parzudaki (1806–1889) and/or his "step-son" Emile Parzudaki (1829–1899)

● today's Ruddy Cuckoo-Dove Macropygia emiliana BONAPARTE 1854
= Emile Parzudaki (1829–1899), French Dealer in Natural History Specimens … etc., etc., whose full name (at the start) was François Charles Emil Fauqueux (!), but he was mostly called, and known as; Emil (or by the "more French" versions "Emile" alt. "Émile") Parzudaki – the Surname adapted (in evereyday life) from his step-father (the above-mentioned Charles Parzudaki, whom Emil's Mother had married in 1837, when Emil was still a boy).

After Mid-July 1858 François Charles Emil Fauqueux officially (even if either one was rarely used, especially in Natural History contexts) became: François Charles Emile Fauqueux-Parzudaki – however, in most cases, still called simply "Emile Parzudaki".

And as such, this Emile Parzudaki died … in Paris, on the 21st of March 1899, at the age of 69."

Wow!

Gouraud, Chevrier & Mearns (and Martin) sure did their home-work!

Björn

PS. Gouraud et al wisely leave the genus Emilia pending (like also Martin pointed out in Post #18):
Quote:
Beolens et al. (2014: 175) stated that the (obsolete) genus Emilia Mulsant, Verreaux and Verreaux, 1866, was named after Emile Parzudaki. Along with Jobling37 we could not find any evidence in the original work (Mulsant et al. 1866: 185) that this genus was named after Emile Parzudaki.
Note that there's some Daughters that might, maybe could have been intended, at least to be considered; Charles's only child/Daughter; Eugénie Emilie Parzudaki (1834–1884) or Jeanne Marie Emilie Parzudaki (born 1860) – (second-born daughter*) of Emile Parzudaki [and, of course, also of his wife: Louise Emma Bonifay (1832-1894)].

*The first-born Daughter (they only had two children/daughters) was; Louise Clarisse Emma, born in 1860 [clearly excluding her from being a candidate for (Ornismya) Heliangelus clarisse DE LONGUEMARE 1841]

Last edited by Calalp : Saturday 18th June 2016 at 22:20.
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