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Bird species Number of Each country

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Old Tuesday 7th October 2003, 07:37   #1
Lihu_Xiong
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Bird species Number of Each country

I don't know how many species of birds each country has. I just know China has a number of 1184 or 1244 or 1253 bird species . Then how about other countries?

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Old Tuesday 7th October 2003, 07:59   #2
Charles Harper
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Japan's list is only about 585 recorded species, of which 250 are breeding birds and 17 are endemic. A victim of isolation from the Asian continent.

By the way, 'ecology' is an interesting word, Lihu-- it comes from Greek oikos house + logos word. The science or study of the house we all live in.
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Old Tuesday 7th October 2003, 08:17   #3
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The "Official" British List is maintained by the BOU (http://www.bou.org.uk/) and the current number of recorded speies is 564.
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Old Tuesday 7th October 2003, 08:46   #4
Charles Harper
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By the way again, Lihu, where did you get the three different numbers (1184, 1244, 1253) for #species in China?
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Old Tuesday 7th October 2003, 08:50   #5
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India has about 1200 recorded species. With sub-species included, the list swells to 1900+. Incidentally, many are common with China.
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Old Tuesday 7th October 2003, 09:07   #6
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Quote:
Originally posted by Charles Harper
By the way again, Lihu, where did you get the three different numbers (1184, 1244, 1253) for #species in China?
Zuoxin_Zheng, One Ornithologist of China has published the number 1244 in a Chinese academic journal named "Acta Zootaxonomica Sinica" in 1994. And in 1999 his student has sumed up the number as 1253.
And 1184 is from "a field guide of China birds".

Maybe there are more than that, i think.
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Old Tuesday 7th October 2003, 13:32   #7
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Birds of the World: A Checklist, by James Clements (2000), includes an appendix listing the 'Distribution of Bird Species of the World by Countries'. He lists China as the 7th birdiest country, with 1204 species (50 endemics). Number One is Colombia, with 1725 species (62 endemics). The country with the most endemic species is New Guinea, with 330!

PS: You can't count subspecies, Sumit! Not fair!
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Old Tuesday 7th October 2003, 14:21   #8
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Go on, charles... pander to my curiosity!

Who's at the other end of the list?
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Old Tuesday 7th October 2003, 14:28   #9
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Hi Birdman,

Don't know if it counts as a country, but I'll put a guess on Antarctica

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Old Tuesday 7th October 2003, 14:32   #10
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Country with the fewest (not 'least') endemics-- would you believe it?!-- a 137-country tie, with 0 endemics!

Country with the fewest species of birds: Easter Island (is that a country?) with 9 species (and 0 endemics).
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Old Tuesday 7th October 2003, 14:39   #11
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Oh, interesting.

It has made me know more. thanks. Charles.
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Old Tuesday 7th October 2003, 15:09   #12
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Sorry Charles, I was just expanding on the theme......
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Old Tuesday 7th October 2003, 16:17   #13
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Cheers Charles

I would have automatically thought Antarctica as well Michael, but then I suppose it depends on what counts in a country's range.

Apart from Penguins, I guess there would be some seabirds (Albatrosses etc.) that stick pretty close to the placefrom time to time.

The 137-way tie sounds surprising for no endemics - but Iguess those that can fly know no borders!

I'm with you Charles, I'm not sure Easter Island is a "country".

(Do you have the ISBN by the way?)
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Old Tuesday 7th October 2003, 16:26   #14
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Easter Island belongs to Chile I believe, so I'm sure they have an endemic or two there.

I confess to Iceland being one of the 137 without an endemic, unless the Dutch split Icelandic Redpoll!!

By the way Charles, good luck enforcing the fewest/least and fewer/less rule. Recent trips back to the home country have revealed that people either don't know or don't care about the difference in usage.

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Old Tuesday 7th October 2003, 16:30   #15
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Easter Island belongs to Chile.

According to Avibase, it has 21 species. The list is here.

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Old Tuesday 7th October 2003, 17:25   #16
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Excuse my ignorance, but can someone explain to me exactly what constitutes an endemic species. Is it to do with where a bird can be found or where it breeds? If for example a Pink Pigeon (endemic of Mauritious) were to get lost and be blown to the coast of Africa does it cease to be endemic or does it have to breed in a second country to lose that status?

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Old Tuesday 7th October 2003, 17:52   #17
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Hi Dave,

Interesting question!

I'd say to qualify as an endemic, the entire population has to breed in the relevant area, and basically all the population has to remain there all year, except that I don't think an occasional departing vagrant would be allowed to 'de-endemic' it.

I wonder if the differences between the two Easter Island lists can be accounted for by the nine being breeding species (bet they're all seabirds!), and the 21 being all species recorded, vagrants included.

Michael

Edit:
Looks more like the nine are perhaps native breeding species (yes, all seabirds!), and the 21 being all species recorded, vagrants and introductions included.

M

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Old Tuesday 7th October 2003, 20:18   #18
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Quote:
I'd say to qualify as an endemic, the entire population has to breed in the relevant area, and basically all the population has to remain there all year, except that I don't think an occasional departing vagrant would be allowed to 'de-endemic' it.
Thanks Michael

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Old Tuesday 7th October 2003, 21:01   #19
Edward woodwood
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Peru hovers around 1800!
Colombia about the same
there are MANY potential splits in the Asian region that could see lists rise a fair bit indeed - an article in the next OBC Bulletin will discuss taxonomy in Asia (see www.orientalbirdclub.org for details on how to join)
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Old Tuesday 7th October 2003, 21:25   #20
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endemism could be described biogeographically or geopolitically - endemic to a country or to a habitat type/island/extended or more likely, restricted area etc. - hope this doesn't sound pretentious as i'm anything but! I guess the best approach depends on what you're wanting to do
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Old Tuesday 7th October 2003, 22:10   #21
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According to Clements the U.K. has 1 endemic. Well I'll bite....what is it?

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Old Tuesday 7th October 2003, 22:28   #22
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Good morning. 0-934797-16-1, B'man.
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Old Tuesday 7th October 2003, 22:40   #23
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Quote:
Originally posted by dennis
According to Clements the U.K. has 1 endemic. Well I'll bite....what is it?
I guess that would be Scottish Crossbill Loxia scoticus (Scientific name off the top of my head so may be incorrectly spelt!)

It is supposed to be halfway between Common (or Eurasian or whatever) Crossbill, and Parrot Crossbill regarding bill size, although I think there are other slight distinguishing features also.

Truth be told, I think someone down at the "Let's get the UK an endemic" Society has been putting in some overtime.

Species differentiation is a little bit of a bugbear of mine, and if this qualifies for definite, then I think someone should take a look at the credentials of the St. Kilda Wren.

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Originally posted by Charles Harper
Good morning. 0-934797-16-1, B'man.
Good evening Charles, and many thanks!
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Old Tuesday 7th October 2003, 23:09   #24
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Hi Birdman,

Spot on (except its L. scotica). I agree about the "Let's get the UK an endemic" Society; the other big reason was that there was a need for a 'flagship species' confined to the native Scots Pine forests in Scotland - the main aim being to attract EU money for preserving the forests, a very laudable aim.

Unfortunately, it now turns out that most of the crossbills nesting in the native pinewoods are Parrot Crossbills, and most Scottish Crossbills are in exotic conifer plantations, with (shock horror) one of the best areas for them being the dreaded plantations disfiguring the Sutherland Flow Country, that conservationists are trying hard to get rid of . . . .

As to its taxonomy, personally, I think Scottish Xb should be treated as a race of Parrot Xb. The best case for a UK endemic is actually Red Grouse, why that hasn't been split I don't know.

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Old Tuesday 7th October 2003, 23:32   #25
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Thanks Birdman and Michael.

Don't think I'll be chasing it soon. Enough ticks to be had on this side of the lake.

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