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Lowland antpittas

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Old Sunday 10th December 2017, 09:16   #1
Daniel Philippe
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Lowland antpittas

Carneiro L., Bravo G.A., Aristizábal N., Cuervo A.M. & Aleixo A., in press. Molecular systematics and biogeography of lowland antpittas (Aves, Grallariidae): The role of vicariance and dispersal in the diversification of a widespread Neotropical lineage. Mol. Phylogen. Evol.

Abstract
We infer phylogenetic relationships, divergence times, and the diversification history of the avian Neotropical antpitta genera Hylopezus and Myrmothera (Grallariidae), based on sequence data (3139 base pairs) from two mitochondrial (ND2 and ND3) and three nuclear markers (TGFB2, MUSK and FGB-I5) from 142 individuals of the 12 currently recognized species in Hylopezus and Myrmothera and 5 outgroup species. Phylogenetic analyses recovered 19 lineages clustered into two major clades, both distributed in Central and South America. Hylopezus nattereri, previously considered a subspecies of H. ochroleucus, was consistently recovered in a separate clade of uncertain phylogenetic relationships within the Grallaricula/Hylopezus/Myrmothera clade. Ancestral range estimation suggested that modern lowland antpittas probably originated in the Amazonian Sedimentary basin during the middle Miocene, and that most lineages within the Hylopezus/Myrmothera clade appeared in the Plio- Pleistocene. However, the rate of diversification in the Hylopezus/Myrmothera clade appeared to have remained constant through time, with no major shifts over the 20 million years. Although the timing when most modern lineages of the Hylopezus/Myrmothera clade coincides with a period of intense landscape changes in the Neotropics (Plio-Pleistocene), the absence of any significant shifts in diversification rates over the last 20 million years challenges the view that there is a strict causal relationship between intensification of landscape changes and cladogenesis. The relative old age of the Hylopezus/Myrmothera clade coupled with an important role ascribed to dispersal for its diversification, favor an alternative scenario whereby long-term persistence and dispersal across an ever-changing landscape might explain constant rates of cladogenesis through time.
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Old Sunday 10th December 2017, 09:44   #2
LeNomenclatoriste
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I'm not against an expanded Myrmothera , which absorb Hylopezus and Grallaricula, because there are no generic names available for dives, nattereri and fulviventris/berlepschi clade.

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Old Tuesday 10th April 2018, 19:20   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Daniel Philippe View Post
Carneiro L., Bravo G.A., Aristizábal N., Cuervo A.M. & Aleixo A., in press. Molecular systematics and biogeography of lowland antpittas (Aves, Grallariidae): The role of vicariance and dispersal in the diversification of a widespread Neotropical lineage. Mol. Phylogen. Evol.
Proposal (785) to SACC

Treat Myrmothera subcanescens as a separate species from M. campanisona
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Old Thursday 19th April 2018, 20:11   #4
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A quantification of vocal differences can be found here: https://www.hbw.com/sites/default/fi...e_antpitta.pdf
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Old Thursday 21st June 2018, 20:06   #5
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Proposal (785) to SACC

Treat Myrmothera subcanescens as a separate species from M. campanisona
PASSED (21 June 2018)
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Old Monday 2nd July 2018, 20:16   #6
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Myrmothera subcanescens

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Carneiro L., Bravo G.A., Aristizábal N., Cuervo A.M. & Aleixo A., in press. Molecular systematics and biogeography of lowland antpittas (Aves, Grallariidae): The role of vicariance and dispersal in the diversification of a widespread Neotropical lineage. Mol. Phylogen. Evol.
IOC Updates Diary July 2

Accept split of Tapajos Antpitta
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Old Thursday 13th September 2018, 15:00   #7
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I don't know if I can post this now because it's in review

Carneiro, L., G.A. Bravo, A. Aleixo. Phenotypic similarity leads to taxonomic inconsistency: a revision of the genera Hylopezus and Myrmothera (Passeriformes, Grallariidae), with the description of a new genus from the Atlantic Forest. In review.
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Old Thursday 13th September 2018, 19:21   #8
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I don't know if I can post this now because it's in review

Carneiro, L., G.A. Bravo, A. Aleixo. Phenotypic similarity leads to taxonomic inconsistency: a revision of the genera Hylopezus and Myrmothera (Passeriformes, Grallariidae), with the description of a new genus from the Atlantic Forest. In review.
You're doing well.
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Old Friday 12th October 2018, 21:24   #9
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If anyone yet has access to this paper can they please advise the name of the new grallarid genus and its type species. All info gratefully acknowledged in the Key.
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Old Friday 12th October 2018, 21:36   #10
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If anyone yet has access to this paper can they please advise the name of the new grallarid genus and its type species. All info gratefully acknowledged in the Key.

Will be published in Zoologica scripta but I can't find it in the website

Of course, the type species is ''Hylopezus'' nattereri
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Old Sunday 25th November 2018, 12:38   #11
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Originally Posted by LeNomenclatoriste View Post
I don't know if I can post this now because it's in review

Carneiro, L., G.A. Bravo, A. Aleixo. Phenotypic similarity leads to taxonomic inconsistency: a revision of the genera Hylopezus and Myrmothera (Passeriformes, Grallariidae), with the description of a new genus from the Atlantic Forest. In review.
First published: 24 November 2018

Abstract:

A comprehensive molecular phylogeny of lowland antpittas in the genera Hylopezus and Myrmothera indicated that Hylopezus, as currently defined, is paraphyletic with respect to Myrmothera and Grallaricula. Specifically, both species now placed in Myrmothera, Hylopezus dives, Hylopezus fulviventris and Hylopezus berlepschi form a strongly supported clade that is sister to a clade comprised by Hylopezus perspicillatus, Hylopezus auricularis, Hylopezus ochroleucus, Hylopezus whittakeri, Hylopezus paraensis, Hylopezus macularius, and Hylopezus dilutus. Furthermore, Hylopezus nattereri is sister to a clade glade grouping Myrmothera, Hylopezus, and Grallaricula, representing the most divergent lineage in this complex. Our approach to assess diagnosability and define generic boundaries among these taxa integrates phylogenetic relationships with morphological and acoustic traits. Given that phenotypic and ecological differences do not warrant merging H. nattereri into any other genus, and because there is no generic name available for H. nattereri, we describe herein a new genus for this Atlantic Forest endemic lineage, Cryptopezus gen. n. We also redefine generic limits in Myrmothera and Hylopezus to have a taxonomic classification concordant with their phylogenetic relationships.
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Old Sunday 25th November 2018, 13:17   #12
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The diagnosis of Cryptopezus is in the supporting information

Quote:
Family Grallariidae

Cryptopezus gen. n.
Type species. Grallaria nattereri Pinto, 1937 by original description.

Included species. Cryptopezus nattereri (Pinto, 1937) comb. nov. Speckle-breasted Antpitta.

Diagnosis. Distinguished from other genera in Grallariidae by breast, upper belly and flanks spotted dusky, forming a particular pattern that is fully distinguishable from stripes and spots present on the other species of lowland’s antpittas; bare orbital skin buffy white. Longer tarsi than Hylopezus sensu stricto and shorter tarsi than Myrmothera sensu lato. Genetically distinct. Loudsongs structurally distinct, show whistled notes, steadily increasing in amplitude, first few slightly falling, but thereafter rising in pitch from c. 2 to c. 2·5 kHz, notes changing shape through the series.
Habitat: Ground and lower growth in humid and montane forest, mature secondary woodland, and borders; often in very densely tangled vegetation and bamboo.
Distribution: Restricted to the southern Atlantic Forest between 1200–1900 m, but it may occur at lower elevations in the southern part of its range.
Etymology. The masculine generic name is taken from the Greek kryptós (hidden) and pezos (walking, that walks) < patéō (to walk, to step), meaning “the one that walks hidden.” This name is an allusion to the secretive habits and the difficulty of locating this bird even when it is active and vocalizing.
Origin and phenotypic evolution. The origin of Cryptopezus predates that of its closest relatives and was estimated as dating back to the Early Miocene (Fig. 1). Recent studies showed that the Atlantic Forest holds ancient lineages that date to the mid-Tertiary, as verified for birds (Derryberry et al., 2011), mammals (Fabre, Galewski, Tilak, & Douzery, 2013; Galewski, Mauffrey, Leite, Patton, & Douzery, 2005) and frogs (Fouquet et al., 2012). This endemic Atlantic Forest lineage seems to have originated from Andean ancestors, and probably reached southeastern South America through the southern Andes, as it is restricted to humid subtropical and montane forests (Krabbe & Schulenberg, 2003). Given the phylogenetic distance recovered between Cryptopezus and H. ochroleucus, their phenotypic similarities seem to be result of either convergence or retention of ancestral characters (Carneiro et al., 2018). These results can also be related to the broad variation of the phenotypic measurements of these lineages (Tables 1 and 2), or to the niche conservatism reported for some Grallariidae species (Stratford & Stouffer, 2015).

Last edited by LeNomenclatoriste : Sunday 25th November 2018 at 13:31.
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Old Sunday 25th November 2018, 14:18   #13
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The diagnosis of Cryptopezus is in the supporting information
And is not published in the sense of the Code. :(
(A name without a published diagnosis is a nomen nudum.)

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Old Sunday 25th November 2018, 15:58   #14
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And is not published in the sense of the Code. :(
(A name without a published diagnosis is a nomen nudum.)
So sad
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