Join for FREE
It only takes a minute!
Discover the ZEISS Digital Nature Hub

Welcome to BirdForum.
BirdForum is the net's largest birding community, dedicated to wild birds and birding, and is absolutely FREE! You are most welcome to register for an account, which allows you to take part in lively discussions in the forum, post your pictures in the gallery and more.

Oceanic Birds of the World

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread
Old Wednesday 8th July 2020, 16:29   #1
Mysticete
Registered User
 
Mysticete's Avatar

 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 3,904
Oceanic Birds of the World

Steve Howell and Kirk Zufelt's new book actually seems to be of interest in this forum, but I haven't seen much discussion here. It uses a VERY progressive taxonomy with a lot of splits not currently recognized.

Anyway, I was interested in seeing what the taxonomy is like, and I will post the new or often unrecognized splits here, in case folks want to keep track. There are a LOT so I will do this as a few different posts

First off:

Northern Rockhopper Penguin (Eudyptes moseleyi)
Southern Rockhopper Penguin (E. chrysocome)
Eastern Rockhopper Penguin (E. filholi)

Kuril Guillemot (Cepphus snowi)

South Georgia Diving-Petrel (P. georgicus)
Codfish Diving Petrel (P. whenuahouensis) = note authors reject proposed name of Whenua Hou Diving-Petrel as not being "English" enough. There are a few other cases here and there with common names different from more widely used ones

Common Diving-Petrel complex
Falkland Diving-Petrel (P. berard)
Subtropical Diving-Petrel (P. urinatrix)
Subantarctic Diving-Petrel (P. exsul)
__________________
World: 1195, ABA: 628
Last Lifer: Connecticut Warbler
Last ABA: Connecticut Warbler
Mammal: 233 Herp: 174
Mysticete is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Wednesday 8th July 2020, 16:31   #2
Mysticete
Registered User
 
Mysticete's Avatar

 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 3,904
Northern Fairy Prion (P. turtur)
Southern Fairy Prion (P. subantarctica)

Greater Fulmar Prion (P. crassirostris)
Lesser Fulmar Prion (P. flemingi)

MacGillivray's Prion (Pachyptila macgillivrayi)

Lesser Snow Petrel (Pagodroma nivea
Greater Snow Petrel (P. confusa)

Pacific Fulmar (Fulmarus rodgersii)
Atlantic Fulmar (F. glacialis)

Black-capped Petrel treated as two species, the undescribed Black-faced Petrel and White-faced Petrel (Pterodroma hasitata)
Vanuatu Petrel (P. occulta)
Gray-faced Petrel (P. gouldi)
Henderson Petrel (P. atrata)

"Tropical Shearwater complex"
Seychelles Shearwater (Puffinus nicolae)
Baillon's Shearwater (P. bailloni)
Melanesian Shearwater (P. gunax)
Micronesian Shearwater (P. dichrous)
Polynesian Shearwater (P. polynesiae)
__________________
World: 1195, ABA: 628
Last Lifer: Connecticut Warbler
Last ABA: Connecticut Warbler
Mammal: 233 Herp: 174
Mysticete is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Wednesday 8th July 2020, 16:32   #3
Mysticete
Registered User
 
Mysticete's Avatar

 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 3,904
Northern Buller's Albatross (Thalassarche platei)
Southern Buller's Albatross (Thalassarche bulleri)

Auckland Shy Albatross (T. steadi)
Tasman Shy Albatross (T. cauta)

European Storm-Petrel complex
British Storm-Petrel (Hydrobates pelagicus)
Mediterranean Storm-Petrel (Hydrobates melitensis)

Band-rumped Storm-Petrel Complex- beyond the well known North Atlantic splits, there are the following:
St. Helena Storm-Petrel (Thalobata helena)
Sao Tome Storm-Petrel (Thalobata castro)
Darwin's Storm-Petrel (undescribed cool season Galapagos form)
Spear's Storm-Petrel (undescribed hot season Galapagos form)
Hawaiian Storm-Petrel (T. cryptoleucura)
Japanese Storm-Petrel (T. kumagai)

Wedge-rumped Storm-Petrel complex
Galapagos Storm-Petrel (Halocyptena tethys)
Peruvian Storm-Petrel (H. kelsalli)

Wilson's Storm-Petrel complex
Lowe's Storm-Petrel (Oceanites galapagoensis)
Elliot's Storm-Petrel (O. gracilis)
Fuegian Storm-Petrel (O. chilensis)
Pincoya Storm-Petrel (O. pincoyae)

New Caledonian Storm-Petrel (undescribed Fregetta sp.)

White-bellied Storm-Petrel complex
Black-bellied Storm-Petrel (Fregetta tropica)
Gough Storm-Petrel (F. melanoleuca)
Inaccessible Storm-Petrel (F. leucogaster)
Titan Storm-Petrel (F. titan)
Juan Fernandez Storm-Petrel (F. segethi)
Tasman Storm-Petrel (F. grallaria)

White-faced Storm-Petrel complex
Cramp's Storm-Petrel (Pelagodroma hypoleuca)
Latham's Storm-Petrel (P. marina)
Australian Storm-Petrel (P. dulciae)
Kermadec Storm-Petrel (P. albiclunis)
__________________
World: 1195, ABA: 628
Last Lifer: Connecticut Warbler
Last ABA: Connecticut Warbler
Mammal: 233 Herp: 174
Mysticete is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Wednesday 8th July 2020, 16:36   #4
Mysticete
Registered User
 
Mysticete's Avatar

 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 3,904
White-tailed Tropicbird complex
Catesby's Tropicbird (Phaethon catesbyi)
Yellow-billed Tropicbird (P. lepturus)

Arabian Tropicbird (P. indicus) - split from Red-billed Tropicbird

Trinidade Frigatebird (F. trinitatis) – split from Lesser Frigatebird

Brown Booby complex
Atlantic Brown Booby (Sula leucogaster)
Indo-Pacific Brown Booby (S. plotus)
Brewster's Brown Booby (S. brewsteri)

Brown Skua complex
Falkland Skua (Catharacta antarctica)
Subtropical Skua (C. hamiltoni)
Subantarctic Skua (C. lonnbergi)
Chatham Skua (C. undescribed)

Western Bridled Tern (Onychoprion melanoptera)
Eastern Bridled Tern (O. anaethetus)

Common Brown Noddy (Anous stolidus)
Galapagos Brown Noddy (A. galapagensis)

Black Noddy Complex
Atlantic Black Noddy (A. americanus)
Indian Black Noddy (A. tenuirostris)
Pacific Black Noddy (A. minutus)
Hawaiian Black Noddy (A. melanogenys)

Blue-gray Noddy complex
Blue Noddy (A. ceruleus)
Gray Noddy (A. albivittus)
Silver Noddy (A. saxatilus)

White Noddy Complex
Atlantic White Noddy (Gygis alba)
Indo-Pacific White Noddy (G. candida)
Little White Noddy (G. microrhyncha)
__________________
World: 1195, ABA: 628
Last Lifer: Connecticut Warbler
Last ABA: Connecticut Warbler
Mammal: 233 Herp: 174
Mysticete is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Wednesday 8th July 2020, 23:19   #5
sicklebill
Registered User

 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Topaz, Queensland
Posts: 920
Thanks for this summary Mysticete, very good to have it; seems highly PSC based from what i can see, be interesting to see how many get accepted by checklist authorities.
sicklebill is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Thursday 9th July 2020, 03:07   #6
Mysticete
Registered User
 
Mysticete's Avatar

 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 3,904
Well apparently there are papers coming out dealing with Noddies soon, so we might get movement on them sooner than later.
__________________
World: 1195, ABA: 628
Last Lifer: Connecticut Warbler
Last ABA: Connecticut Warbler
Mammal: 233 Herp: 174
Mysticete is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Thursday 9th July 2020, 06:26   #7
andyadcock
Registered User
 
andyadcock's Avatar

 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: UK and Occasionally St Petersburg, Russia
Posts: 18,882
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mysticete View Post
White-tailed Tropicbird complex
Catesby's Tropicbird (Phaethon catesbyi)
Yellow-billed Tropicbird (P. lepturus)

Arabian Tropicbird (P. indicus) - split from Red-billed Tropicbird

Trinidade Frigatebird (F. trinitatis) – split from Lesser Frigatebird

Brown Booby complex
Atlantic Brown Booby (Sula leucogaster)
Indo-Pacific Brown Booby (S. plotus)
Brewster's Brown Booby (S. brewsteri)

Brown Skua complex
Falkland Skua (Catharacta antarctica)
Subtropical Skua (C. hamiltoni)
Subantarctic Skua (C. lonnbergi)
Chatham Skua (C. undescribed)

Western Bridled Tern (Onychoprion melanoptera)
Eastern Bridled Tern (O. anaethetus)

Common Brown Noddy (Anous stolidus)
Galapagos Brown Noddy (A. galapagensis)

Black Noddy Complex
Atlantic Black Noddy (A. americanus)
Indian Black Noddy (A. tenuirostris)
Pacific Black Noddy (A. minutus)
Hawaiian Black Noddy (A. melanogenys)

Blue-gray Noddy complex
Blue Noddy (A. ceruleus)
Gray Noddy (A. albivittus)
Silver Noddy (A. saxatilus)

White Noddy Complex
Atlantic White Noddy (Gygis alba)
Indo-Pacific White Noddy (G. candida)
Little White Noddy (G. microrhyncha)
White-tailed Tropicbird, surprised that the highly distinctive, Chistmas Island endemic fulvus isn't on the list for splitting?
__________________
Andy A
andyadcock is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Thursday 9th July 2020, 08:15   #8
Dave Boyle
Registered User

 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Skomer
Posts: 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mysticete View Post
Codfish Diving Petrel (P. whenuahouensis) = note authors reject proposed name of Whenua Hou Diving-Petrel as not being "English" enough. There are a few other cases here and there with common names different from more widely used ones
At the risk of sparking another debate on 'English' names, I wonder if they would stand by this decision in the current climate?

Wheua Hou is the ancestral home to Ngai Tahu & due to the island's cultural significance Ngai Tahu are involved with any management decisions on the island & were asked to name the Diving Petrel when it was described as a new species recently
Dave Boyle is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Thursday 9th July 2020, 09:31   #9
Ian Lewis
Registered User
 
Ian Lewis's Avatar

 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Poole, Dorset
Posts: 290
Quote:
Originally Posted by andyadcock View Post
White-tailed Tropicbird, surprised that the highly distinctive, Chistmas Island endemic fulvus isn't on the list for splitting?
I've seen the tropicbirds on Christmas Island and they seem to vary from almost pure white, to a hint of yellow to a deep golden colour. Mixed pairs seem common.

I'm sure they are just a colour morph.
__________________
Latest lifer - Collared Gnatwren (8640 IOC)
Latest UK - Yelkouan Shearwater (502 IOC)

Last edited by Ian Lewis : Thursday 9th July 2020 at 13:01.
Ian Lewis is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Thursday 9th July 2020, 10:42   #10
andyadcock
Registered User
 
andyadcock's Avatar

 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: UK and Occasionally St Petersburg, Russia
Posts: 18,882
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ian Lewis View Post
I've seen the tropicbirds on Christmas Island and they seem to vary from almost pure white, to a hint of yellow but deep golden colour. Mixed pairs seem common.

I'm sure they are just a colour morph.
Thanks Ian,
do I recall a race of Red-tailed in Indonesia or Australasia that gets referred to as Apricot-tailed or is that my failing memory again?
__________________
Andy A
andyadcock is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Thursday 9th July 2020, 11:26   #11
jurek
Registered User
 
jurek's Avatar

 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Switzerland/Poland
Posts: 4,355
Looking forward to all these extralimital records. For example wrong-ocean Brown Boobies in Central America.
jurek is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Thursday 9th July 2020, 12:58   #12
Mysticete
Registered User
 
Mysticete's Avatar

 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 3,904
There are some potential interesting studies that could emerge from this, for sure.

Apparently Hawaiian and Pacific Black Noddies have different nesting strategies. Both also inhabit the Hawaiian archipelago, with the Pacific Black nesting in the northwest chain of islands, and the Hawaiian on the main island. Obviously there is a potential there for both forms to overlap...I wonder if there is any evidence of interbreeding in Hawaii, or any place where both species nest in close proximity?
__________________
World: 1195, ABA: 628
Last Lifer: Connecticut Warbler
Last ABA: Connecticut Warbler
Mammal: 233 Herp: 174
Mysticete is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Thursday 9th July 2020, 13:03   #13
Mysticete
Registered User
 
Mysticete's Avatar

 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 3,904
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave Boyle View Post
At the risk of sparking another debate on 'English' names, I wonder if they would stand by this decision in the current climate?

Wheua Hou is the ancestral home to Ngai Tahu & due to the island's cultural significance Ngai Tahu are involved with any management decisions on the island & were asked to name the Diving Petrel when it was described as a new species recently
There were a couple of other cases where they chose a less-used name over an existing one. IIRC, their favored name for Short-tailed Albatross is Steller's Albatross. It would be interesting to hear what there opinion is, although my gut sense is I doubt it has changed.
__________________
World: 1195, ABA: 628
Last Lifer: Connecticut Warbler
Last ABA: Connecticut Warbler
Mammal: 233 Herp: 174
Mysticete is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Thursday 9th July 2020, 13:05   #14
Mysticete
Registered User
 
Mysticete's Avatar

 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 3,904
I should also note that there were many other species which the text mentions "probably" actually containing multiple cryptic species, but since nothing was delimited, I didn't list them. There are also a few forms they namecheck but the text reads as them not feeling comfortable yet that those splits are valid (references to Tasman Booby and the Little Blue Penguin splits seem to fall in this category).
__________________
World: 1195, ABA: 628
Last Lifer: Connecticut Warbler
Last ABA: Connecticut Warbler
Mammal: 233 Herp: 174
Mysticete is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Thursday 9th July 2020, 15:25   #15
andyadcock
Registered User
 
andyadcock's Avatar

 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: UK and Occasionally St Petersburg, Russia
Posts: 18,882
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mysticete View Post
There were a couple of other cases where they chose a less-used name over an existing one. IIRC, their favored name for Short-tailed Albatross is Steller's Albatross. It would be interesting to hear what there opinion is, although my gut sense is I doubt it has changed.
Well given that eponyms, seem to have been out of fashion for some time and have been slowly disappearing, I don't see how it could stand?
__________________
Andy A
andyadcock is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Thursday 9th July 2020, 15:31   #16
andyadcock
Registered User
 
andyadcock's Avatar

 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: UK and Occasionally St Petersburg, Russia
Posts: 18,882
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave Boyle View Post
At the risk of sparking another debate on 'English' names, I wonder if they would stand by this decision in the current climate?

Wheua Hou is the ancestral home to Ngai Tahu & due to the island's cultural significance Ngai Tahu are involved with any management decisions on the island & were asked to name the Diving Petrel when it was described as a new species recently
Many field guides will use the English name in the main text and list local names, where applicable, in a seperate list in the index.

I see no reason for this to be any different?
__________________
Andy A
andyadcock is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Thursday 9th July 2020, 15:39   #17
Ian Lewis
Registered User
 
Ian Lewis's Avatar

 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Poole, Dorset
Posts: 290
Quote:
Originally Posted by andyadcock View Post
Thanks Ian,
do I recall a race of Red-tailed in Indonesia or Australasia that gets referred to as Apricot-tailed or is that my failing memory again?
Although IOC includes an east Indian Ocean race westralis there is no mention in the Ocean Birds book.
__________________
Latest lifer - Collared Gnatwren (8640 IOC)
Latest UK - Yelkouan Shearwater (502 IOC)

Last edited by Ian Lewis : Thursday 9th July 2020 at 15:48.
Ian Lewis is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Thursday 9th July 2020, 17:28   #18
andyadcock
Registered User
 
andyadcock's Avatar

 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: UK and Occasionally St Petersburg, Russia
Posts: 18,882
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ian Lewis View Post
Although IOC includes an east Indian Ocean race westralis there is no mention in the Ocean Birds book.
Thanks Ian,
I have a feeling that I've heard the name given to the White-tailed birds on Bali but I could be wrong?
__________________
Andy A
andyadcock is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Thursday 9th July 2020, 17:38   #19
Dave Boyle
Registered User

 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Skomer
Posts: 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by andyadcock View Post
Many field guides will use the English name in the main text and list local names, where applicable, in a seperate list in the index.

I see no reason for this to be any different?
Its not a local name though, its the only common name, before the split it was thought to be a South Georgia Diving Petrel - Ngai Tahu were specifically asked to name the bird, for the first time, & this is the name they wanted, its not for oversees birders to re-name it because they don't like it
Dave Boyle is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Thursday 9th July 2020, 18:06   #20
andyadcock
Registered User
 
andyadcock's Avatar

 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: UK and Occasionally St Petersburg, Russia
Posts: 18,882
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave Boyle View Post
Its not a local name though, its the only common name, before the split it was thought to be a South Georgia Diving Petrel - Ngai Tahu were specifically asked to name the bird, for the first time, & this is the name they wanted, its not for oversees birders to re-name it because they don't like it
Is 'Codfish' a literal translation of the name given by the Islanders? I have no issue in this case with Whenua Hou Diving-Petrel, it's not a completely foreign name, I wonder what the committee had agaisnst it? Was that their reason 'not English enough'?

What do you mean by 'the current climate', you mean pressure being applied from certain quarters?
__________________
Andy A

Last edited by andyadcock : Thursday 9th July 2020 at 18:10. Reason: actual
andyadcock is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Thursday 9th July 2020, 19:10   #21
Dave Boyle
Registered User

 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Skomer
Posts: 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by andyadcock View Post
Is 'Codfish' a literal translation of the name given by the Islanders? I have no issue in this case with Whenua Hou Diving-Petrel, it's not a completely foreign name, I wonder what the committee had agaisnst it? Was that their reason 'not English enough'?

What do you mean by 'the current climate', you mean pressure being applied from certain quarters?
Hi Andy, no Whenua Hou means new land, Codfish was given to the island by sealers.

New Zealand has done a lot to 'de-colonise' place names & a lot of places now go by both Maori & English names. There is more & more use of Maori names for birds now & its common in other groups too - I think with trees & shrubs pretty much everything is known principally by it's Maori name.

I understand your stand-point, I don't agree with it, but either way I think this case is different - you've got a bird reduced to one tiny relict population on one island & the people who see the island as their spiritual home were specifically asked to name it
Dave Boyle is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Thursday 9th July 2020, 22:30   #22
l_raty
laurent raty
 
l_raty's Avatar

 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Brussels, Belgium
Posts: 3,607
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave Boyle View Post
[...] you've got a bird reduced to one tiny relict population on one island & the people who see the island as their spiritual home were specifically asked to name it
Nitpicking, perhaps, but, as I understand the OD, the Ngāi Tahu were not asked to give the bird an English name. They were asked to select the scientific (i.e., main translingual) name -- this produced whenuahouensis, which obviously no one is trying to change.
Regarding the vernacular, the authors stated, quite explicitly: "We propose the English common name ‘Whenua Hou Diving Petrel’."
l_raty is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Friday 10th July 2020, 01:02   #23
Nutcracker
Stop Brexit!
 
Nutcracker's Avatar

 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: UK
Posts: 20,698
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave Boyle View Post
New Zealand has done a lot to 'de-colonise' place names & a lot of places now go by both Maori & English names. There is more & more use of Maori names for birds now & its common in other groups too - I think with trees & shrubs pretty much everything is known principally by it's Maori name.
Yes, correct. Wish the Australians & Americans would do likewise! Far too many trees called 'pine' which aren't pines, and called 'cedar' which aren't cedars.
Nutcracker is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Friday 10th July 2020, 11:05   #24
Calalp
Björn Bergenholtz
 
Calalp's Avatar

 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Stockholm, Sweden
Posts: 3,635
• Whenua Hou Diving Petrel (alt. ditto Diving-petrel) Pelecanoides whenuahouensis FISCHER et al 2018 (OD in Laurent's post #22, alt./or here, also see here, with some nice additional photos).

As of now IOC (ver. 10.1, 2020) has it as Pelecanoides georgicus whenuahouensis, this far without an English/Common name, but BirdLife International already (as of August 2019) has it as Whenua Hou Diving-petrel Pelecanoides whenuahouensis (here), as well as Wiki (here).

If IOC accept the split I hope they respect the Authors, and their "Whenua Hou Diving Petrel’ (regardless with, or without, how to/the use of, hyphen or/and Capital letters, of course, that's a different topic ).

I think it's a perfect fit, both well-advised and justified – a rare, unique name, on a rare, unique (and Critically Endangered) bird.

As far as I am concerned, I sure would love to have a whenuahoudykpetrell in the Swedish (World) List! It's far better than Codfish Diving Petrel (which in Swedish would be codfishdykpetrell, or even worse; codfishislanddykpetrell). Those birds themselves has very little to do with any (blue) codfishes (Parapercis colias). That they breed on an Island named after one of the Island's main sources of income is (in my mind) a bit irrelevant for its Common name.

Björn

PS. Not to confuse with Codfish Island, Ontario, Canada.
Calalp is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Friday 10th July 2020, 13:54   #25
Nutcracker
Stop Brexit!
 
Nutcracker's Avatar

 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: UK
Posts: 20,698
Quote:
Originally Posted by Calalp View Post
As far as I am concerned, I sure would love to have a whenuahoudykpetrell in the Swedish (World) List! It's far better than Codfish Diving Petrel (which in Swedish would be codfishdykpetrell, or even worse; codfishislanddykpetrell). ...
Not Torskfiskdykpetrell or Torskfisködykpetrell?
Nutcracker is offline  
Reply With Quote
Advertisement
Reply


Thread Tools
Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Oceanic Birds of the World Swissboy Books, Magazines, Publications, Video & DVD 16 Wednesday 24th June 2020 07:40
Oceanic Birds of the World yaffle27 Books, Magazines, Publications, Video & DVD 14 Wednesday 27th May 2020 12:37
Swift Oceanic 6x30 Porro Bencw Swift 4 Sunday 31st January 2016 09:27
Seabirds of Chilean oceanic islands Richard Klim Bird Taxonomy and Nomenclature 0 Friday 7th November 2014 15:17
Birds in Britain: an exclusive insight into the world of British birds (BTO) BF Newsroom Latest news from the BTO 0 Monday 10th September 2012 13:08

{googleads}

Fatbirder's Top 1000 Birding Websites

Help support BirdForum

Page generated in 0.23520899 seconds with 37 queries
All times are GMT. The time now is 02:59.