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Old Wednesday 10th August 2011, 11:32   #1
Daniel Philippe
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eBird

Not sure whether eBird taxonomy has been discussed on this forum yet.
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Old Wednesday 10th August 2011, 13:41   #2
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Isn't eBird taxonomy essentially the same as Clements, but including a few undescribed taxa?

eBird v1.52 reflecting Clements v6.6 (Aug 2011) doesn't seem to be posted yet (the link in eBird Taxonomy still points to v1.51), but Taxonomy updating and My eBird weirdness(!) gives a preview of a few of the updates (the AOU splits being no surprise, of course).

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Old Wednesday 10th August 2011, 14:55   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Klim View Post
eBird v1.52 reflecting Clements v6.6 (Aug 2011) doesn't seem to be posted yet .
Unless I messed it, Clements 6.6 is not posted yet.

Did I miss something?
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Old Wednesday 10th August 2011, 14:59   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SteveO43 View Post
Unless I messed it, Clements 6.6 is not posted yet.
Did I miss something?
No, Steve - apologies. I just meant that the preview of eBird v1.52, which will match the imminent (mid-Aug) Clements v6.6, reveals a few of the updates therein.

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Old Wednesday 10th August 2011, 15:03   #5
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No apologies needed. I thought that it was released while I was sleeping, and I could not find it.
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Old Wednesday 10th August 2011, 15:38   #6
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So, from what I can gather:

Clements has changed the name of the old world species of Moorhen to Eurasian Moorhen...that will go over well I am sure...

Did IOC split Olive thrush yet? I just don't remember a huge taxonomic overhaul of that species, which I feel like I would remember since I have seen this species in Cape Town.
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Old Wednesday 10th August 2011, 15:39   #7
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It will also be interesting if, with the "Fork-tailed Swift" split, if Fork-tailed isn't completely done away with. It's odd that AOU seems to be the only list using that name over Pacific Swift for the whole complex
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Old Wednesday 10th August 2011, 16:19   #8
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Olive Thrush

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mysticete View Post
Did IOC split Olive thrush yet?
IOC recognises the following (lumped in Clements v6.5):
  1. Turdus olivaceus - Olive Thrush
  2. Turdus roehli - Usambara Thrush
  3. Turdus abyssinicus - Abyssinian Thrush
  4. Turdus smithi - Karoo Thrush
  5. Turdus ludoviciae - Somali Thrush
  6. Turdus helleri - Taita Thrush
PS. But what is Cornell's 7th species...?

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Old Wednesday 10th August 2011, 16:37   #9
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Fork-tailed/Pacific Swift

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Originally Posted by Mysticete View Post
It will also be interesting if, with the "Fork-tailed Swift" split, if Fork-tailed isn't completely done away with. It's odd that AOU seems to be the only list using that name over Pacific Swift for the whole complex
Actually most lists (IOC, BLI, Clements, AERC, Dutch Birding, OSME, OBC, AOU) currently use the name Fork-tailed Swift for Apus pacificus. But the draft species updates for IOC v2.10 indicate that A pacifus sensu stricto will be named Pacific Swift (although not yet listed as an English name update).
www.worldbirdnames.org/updates-spp.html

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Old Wednesday 10th August 2011, 17:13   #10
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Thanks for the correction. I had seen Pacific Swift as the favored name for BOU and in the Birds of East Asia guide, so I assumed it was the dominant name.
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Old Friday 12th August 2011, 21:47   #11
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eBird v1.52

eBird v1.52 (Aug 2011), reflecting Clements v6.6 ('mid-Aug 2011'), posted online today:Of interest: "Antioquia Antpitta (undescribed form) Grallaria (undescribed form)" (!)
[Controversy deferred - includes SACC changes only up to end-Jun 2011.]

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Old Saturday 13th August 2011, 03:41   #12
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They have been busy - and it is good to see that the "group" concept has been extended to many Old World species. As they say in the notes - Let them know about others that should be included.

Love the splits - although I am really interested only in the scientific accuracy. Armchair ticks - no, not me!
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Old Saturday 13th August 2011, 08:16   #13
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Olive Thrush

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Originally Posted by Richard Klim View Post
But what is Cornell's 7th species...?
Olive Thrush has actually been split into six species (as per IOC), not seven (as stated in Taxonomy updating and My eBird weirdness, 9 Aug 2011).
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Old Saturday 13th August 2011, 10:03   #14
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Other initial observations...
  • Cornell is even ahead of IOC in fully recognising Buteo bannermani Cape Verde Buzzard (already recognised by Dutch Birding).

  • Strix nivicola Himalayan Owl should be S nivicolum according to H&M3 Corrigenda 2.1 (also Zoonomen, IOC).
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Old Friday 30th December 2011, 08:07   #15
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“Other initial observations...

• Strix nivicola Himalayan Owl should be S nivicolum according to H&M3 Corrigenda 2.1 (also Zoonomen, IOC).”
Really confused about nivicola v. nivicolum.

Urrua nivicola Hodgson MSS, Icones accipitres (his drawings stored at British Museum, I think)
Mesomorpha nivicola Hodgson in Gray’s Zool. Misc. P. 82 (1844?)(No description)
Syrnium nivicolum Hodgson in Blyth JASB XIV p. 185 (1845?) (no description other than different from European one.) (A description /comparison of two specimens on p. 550)

Zoonomen note : Strix is a classical feminine Latin noun. Strix (f.) Strix aluco is Linnaeus type species of Strix. If nivicolum is adjective it stays neuter? It means dweller in the nivi? Or nivi dweller?


Most classical Latin nouns that end in the substantival suffix -cola [dweller] are masculine, but a few are feminine as well as masculine [e.g. monticola, limicola (Glare 1982)].

Gallinula andicolus Spelling (Zoonomen)
• Often spelt G. andicola. Originally described as Hypsibamon andicola Cabanis, 1873.
• David N & Gosselin M. 2002. "Gender agreement of avian species names." BBOC. 122(1):37 discuss this. They indicate that: "The name andicolus ends here in the substantival suffix -cola [dweller] with a modified ending." [and thus should not be changed].

http://ijs.sgmjournals.org/content/6/3/101.full.pdf .

“Comment When the code refers to a word of common or variable gender, it means nouns which are c. (common, i.e. the same ending is found in words which may be masculine or feminine). It is not referring to three-termination adjectives, which in Greek and Latin are always used in a particular gender (as is clear in the code from the statement that combination with an adjectival name determines gender). (Two-termination adjectives present difficulties similar to those of nouns which are common,…”
http://www.britishbirds.co.uk/letter...the-willow-tit .

Both Latin and Greek know three genders, i.e. contain nouns of masculine, feminine and neuter gender. Adjectives associated with nouns follow these in gender. For the correct formation of specific epithets (as adjectives) it is therefore necessary to know the gender of the genus name or of its last component, respectively. of feminine or masculine gender: -cola (-incola);.

Botany “ In particular, the usage of the word element -cola as an adjective is a correctable error…Ex. 8. Rubus "amnicolus" is a correctable error for R. amnicola Blanch. (1906).
http://diesgaudii.genvid.com/latin/cola001.pdf .

Specific names involving ‘-cola’. There are several of these in the Simuliidae and there has been confusion concerning them. The suffix ‘-cola’ is a noun in classical Latin (e.g. see Stearn, 1995) but the New Latin adjectival derivatives ‘-colus’ (masculine), ‘ -cola’ (feminine) and ‘-colum’ (neuter)’ have a long pedigree in zoology and their use in nomenclature has never been prohibited by the International Commission on Zoological Nomenclature. The spelling is not subject to alteration where it was clearly originally used as a noun, e.g. Simulium monticola Friederichs (mountain-dweller, use of -cola with neuter generic name) but is subject to gender change when used as an adjective, e.g. Eusimulium alticolum Dyar & Shannon (dwelling high, spelling showing use as adjective in combination with neuter generic name). Thus in the latter case the original spelling alticolum is subject to mandatory change to alticola when combined with Cnephia or Mayacnephia (both feminine). See also Brown (1956: 48).?????


On a second point Joe Morlan asked a good question about Song Sparrow groups and Ebird / Clements and M. Iliff sez:
PS - Below are the BNA groups with the Clements subspecies rearranged slightly. Please let me know if you spot any errors in this arrangement.
http://groups.google.com/group/ebird...acb59520bd7499 .
Any errors?
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Old Friday 30th December 2011, 12:30   #16
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Song Sparrow

Quote:
Originally Posted by mb1848 View Post
On a second point Joe Morlan asked a good question about Song Sparrow groups and Ebird / Clements and M. Iliff sez:
PS - Below are the BNA groups with the Clements subspecies rearranged slightly. Please let me know if you spot any errors in this arrangement.
http://groups.google.com/group/ebird...acb59520bd7499 .
Any errors?
Marshall Iliff's rearrangement into five groups is consistent with BNA Online (Arcese et al 2002) - although I prefer BNA's 24 sspp to the 39 recognised by Cornell. [HBW 16 recognises 25: BNA's 24, plus zacapu (synonymised with adusta by BNA).]

Until the Check-list 2nd edition (1895) at least, AOU recognised Bischoff's Song Sparrow M insignis (of the Kodiak Group), and Aleutian Song Sparrow M cinerea (presumably today's sanaka and maxima?) as distinct species. [Lumped in the 3rd edition (1910).]

Navarro-Sigüenza & Peterson 2004 suggests three evolutionary species within the Mexican population:
  • M mexicana (including 'azteca', villai, adusta, 'yuriria', zacapu) - essentially BNA's Mexican Plateau group
  • M rivularis (possibly including 'saltonis' - synonymised with fallax by BNA)
  • M goldmani (including 'niceae' - synonymised with mexicana by BNA)

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Old Friday 30th December 2011, 19:18   #17
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@mb1848:

specific epiphets ending in -colus, -cola and -colum should be indeclinable, thus the original description should be followed.

And not the words ending in -cola are masculine and sometimes feminine or neuter, but the genera! By default they are masculine, unless in the first usage the are combined with specific epiphets that are clearly feminine or neuter. Only in these cases the gender of the genus becomes feminine or neuter.

Zoonomen is rather confusing with Grallaria (and not Gallinula) andicolus.
Original description was Hypsibamon andicolus (not andicola).

Blyth is regarded as the author of Strix nivicolum (original description Syrnium nivicolum "Hodgson". The other two are regarded as being a nomen nudum.

This is my understanding of how to use names ending in -colus, -cola and colum. This does not mean my opinion is the only correct one.

Please excuse me for my horrible English (not my native language).

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