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Trochilidae

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Old Sunday 20th September 2015, 20:27   #51
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Melanie View Post
Zootaxa 3957 (1): 143–150 (13 May 2015)
Classification of the Polytminae (Aves: Trochilidae)
J. V. REMSEN JR., F. GARY STILES & JIMMY A. MCGUIRE

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Old Sunday 20th September 2015, 20:46   #52
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In summary, we propose that Eulampis be merged with Anthracothorax. Boie (1831) described both genera, but Anthracothorax has priority on the basis of being described on page 545 vs. page 547 for Eulampis.
There's no such thing as page priority according to the ICZN. Would this statement count as a first reviser act though?

John Boyd uses Eulampis, but mistakenly attributes Anthracothorax to Reichenbach, 1854

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Last edited by thyoloalethe : Sunday 20th September 2015 at 20:50. Reason: additional info; italics added
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Old Monday 21st September 2015, 09:40   #53
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Originally Posted by thyoloalethe View Post
Would this statement count as a first reviser act though?
Yes, it definitely would. It would (obviously) also be important to check whether no earlier FR act exists; but, if the synonymization is new, it's likely there'll be none.

Anthracothorax Boie 1831 [OD] (column 545); originally included nominal species Trochilus mango [Linn.?], T. holosericeus Gm., T. violaceus Gm., T. gramineus Gm.
Eulampis Boie 1831 [OD] (column 547); originally included nominal species T. violaceus Gm., T. jugularis Linn., T. auratus Linn., T. niger P. Max. [= Wied].

(And Reichenbach 1854 [here] used both, attributing them correctly to Boie.)

Gray 1840 [here] designated "E. aurata, (Audeb.) Boie" as the type of Eulampis, adding a reference to Edwards' plate 266 [here]; T. auratus is actually of Gmelin 1788 [OD], and is now treated as a junior synonym of T. jugularis Linn. 1766. (Gray may have added the ref to Edward's plate due to Gmelin's original name being based on a plate by Latham [here], which shows a green-backed bird, while Boie's diagnosis for the genus described the upperparts as black; both Edwards' and Latham's plates show the same species, though, so we are presumably on safe ground.)

I'm much less clear about the type of Anthracothorax. Gray, in 1840 and later, retained this name in the synonymy of Lampornis; his type designations apply only to the latter. The currently accepted designation (eg., H&M4) seems to be by Elliot 1879 [here], who designated "T. violicauda Bodd." [OD] (now in the synonymy of T. viridigula Bodd.). But this is not an originally included nominal species, and thus not eligible. Neither is Boddaert's name a replacement name for one of the originally included nominal species; and the only things that look like one of the originally included nominal species, and that Elliot cited in the synonymy of violicauda, are (four) subsequent (mis)uses of mango -- thus, Elliot's designation cannot be interpreted as an indirect designation of one of the OINS. At first glance, there seems to be no way that Elliot fixed the type validly.
Is there another type designation published elsewhere?

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Old Monday 21st September 2015, 15:02   #54
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The currently accepted designation (eg., H&M4) seems to be by Elliot 1879 [here], who designated "T. violicauda Bodd." [OD] (now in the synonymy of T. viridigula Bodd.).
From what Elliot had written in 1872 (Ibis, s.3, 2:345-357), his intent when designating violicauda in 1879 seems reasonably clear, in fact: in 1872, he had advocated moving the name mango Linn. 1766 [OD] from the mainland taxon to which it was apparently applied by most authors at this time, to the Jamaican bird to which it has been applied since (and which was then generally known as Lampornis porphyrurus). As a corollary, the name applying to the mainland population (the mango "of authors") was changed from mango Linn. to violicauda Boddaert. What he then did in 1879, was to designate, as type of Anthracothorax Boie, the taxonomic species that he thought Boie was calling by the name of mango, and which he, in turn, called by the name that he regarded as applying validly to it.

This type of action is now actually possible under the Code; but it was not before 2000, and it still is not as a single-step process: first, you'd need to have a type species fixed (as one of the originally included nominal species); then, it might perhaps be argued that the type species (now that you have one) is demonstrably misidentified, and in need of a correction. (Furthermore, in the present case, establishing the misidentification beyond reasonable doubt is probably not even possible: Boie's generic diagnosis is vague enough to apply to either taxa, and he did not describe his species individually, nor indicate their geographical origin. The nomenclatural validity of such a correction is conditional to the new designated type really being the taxonomic species involved in the misidentification. To anybody disagreeing with this, the correction is to be ignored. Thus, if there is the slightest chance that others might have another opinion, it's probably best not even to think about applying this provision.)
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Old Monday 21st September 2015, 22:15   #55
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Hellmayr 1918 says Anthracothorax Boie, Isis, 1831, p. 545 (Type Trochilus violicauda Boddaert = Trochilus nigricollis Vieillot). No further explanation. Wetmore 1929 agrees.
https://books.google.com/books?id=JU...gbs_navlinks_s . Birds of the Pnchot expedition page 10. Not sure this helps.
http://iczn.org/content/there-such-t...ority%E2%80%9D . When designating a type there is position precedence.
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Old Tuesday 22nd September 2015, 08:57   #56
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Originally Posted by mb1848 View Post
Hellmayr 1918 says Anthracothorax Boie, Isis, 1831, p. 545 (Type Trochilus violicauda Boddaert = Trochilus nigricollis Vieillot). No further explanation. Wetmore 1929 agrees.
https://books.google.com/books?id=JU...gbs_navlinks_s . Birds of the Pnchot expedition page 10. Not sure this helps.
The designation by Elliot has been recurrently accepted, even though, as it stands and under the current Code, it is perfectly invalid. However:
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Code
69.2.2. If an author designates as type species a nominal species that was not originally included (or accepts another's such designation) and if, but only if, at the same time he or she places that nominal species in synonymy with one and only one of the originally included species (as defined in Article 67.2), that act constitutes fixation of the latter species as type species of the nominal genus or subgenus.
...Thus the acceptance of another's invalid designation can sometimes hide an indirect valid designation of a different nominal species. For instance, this statement by Peters 1945, when he accepted Elliot's designation of T. violicauda:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peters
Genus ANTHRACOTHORAX Boie 1
Anthracothorax Boie, Isis von Oken, 1831, col. 545. Type, by subsequent designation, Trochilus violicauda Boddaert = Trochilus gramineus Gmelin. (Elliot, Classif. Syn. Trochil., 1879, p. 37.)
...constitutes a potentially valid subsequent designation of T. gramineus Gm., which was an originally included nominal species, and is thus eligible to be the type of Anthracothorax. The caveat being that someone else may have done something similar before him.


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http://iczn.org/content/there-such-t...ority%E2%80%9D . When designating a type there is position precedence.
Yes, but
- this is about which of the originally included nominal species of a genus-group name should be given "precedence" to be selected as a type, and completely unrelated to which of two or more simultaneously published names should be given "precedence" to be used as a valid name;
- this is part of a recommendation that aims at providing guidance, not at all something mandatory; and
- position is the lowest-ranked criterion that is cited in this context (the one that you should consider when you really, really can't find any reason to do something else):
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Code
Recommendation 69A. Criteria of preference. In designating a type species for a nominal genus or subgenus, an author should give preference to a species that is adequately described or illustrated, or of which type material still exists, or of which material is easily obtained. When these properties are shared by more than one species, an author should be guided by the following criteria, in order of preference:
69A.1. The most common species, or one of medical or economic importance, or one with the specific name communis, vulgaris, medicinalis, or officinalis, should be designated.
69A.2. If the valid name or a synonym of one of the originally included nominal species includes a species-group name virtually the same as the name of the genus-group taxon, or that is of the same derivation or meaning, that species should be designated as the type species (choice resulting from "virtual tautonymy"), unless such designation is strongly contra-indicated by other factors.
Examples. Bos taurus, Equus caballus, Ovis aries, Scomber scombrus, Sphaerostoma globiporum, Spinicapitichthys spiniceps.
69A.3. If some of the originally included nominal species have been removed to other nominal genus-group taxa, preference should be given to a remaining species, if any such is suitable ("choice following elimination").
69A.4. A nominal species having a sexually mature specimen as its type is generally preferable to one based on a larval or otherwise immature specimen.
69A.5. If more than one group of species is recognized in a nominal genus-group taxon, preference should be given to a nominal species that belongs to as large a group as possible.
69A.6. In genus-group taxa of parasites, preference should be given to a nominal species that parasitizes humans or an animal of economic importance or a common and widespread host species.
69A.7. All other things being equal, preference should be given to a nominal species well known to the author of the nominal genus-group taxon at the time he or she established it.
69A.8. If an author is known to have habitually placed a "typical" (i.e. representative) species first and described others by comparison with it, that fact should be considered in the designation of a type species.
69A.9. If an author is known to have denoted type species by their position ("first species rule"), the first nominal species cited by him or her should be designated as the type species.
69A.10. All other things being equal, preference should be given to the nominal species cited first in the work, page or line ("position precedence").

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Old Tuesday 22nd September 2015, 11:12   #57
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This is quite extraordinary. Even the more so as I once had an MS rejected from Zootaxa principally on the basis that in it, one of two contemporaneously described genera was chosen using and citing the first reviser principle provisions of the Code. The editor and a reviewer asserted this to be wrong and in breach of the Code, and that page position priority applied. Seriously.

At least Zootaxa are consistent in generally seeking to ignore or breach the Code in relation to first reviser actions and the spelling of family names. You don't see this sort of nonsense ever in Bull BOC, ZB and other journals specialising in avian taxonomy. They really need to get their house in order to justify their high ratings and profile.
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Old Tuesday 22nd September 2015, 11:59   #58
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http://www.mapress.com/zootaxa/2007f/z01524p059f.pdf -- You'd think they'd know...
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Old Thursday 24th September 2015, 04:26   #59
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Ernst Mayr in early 1950's protested about a change introduced in 1948 Zoological Congress of absolute line and page priority.
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Old Thursday 24th September 2015, 08:46   #60
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Ernst Mayr in early 1950's protested about a change introduced in 1948 Zoological Congress of absolute line and page priority.
- The Paris Congress of 1948 replaced the First Reviser Principle that had hitherto been in the Règles with a principle of page/line precedence (see BZN 4, 1950).
- There were indeed significant protestations and discussions in the immediately subsequent years (I didn't run into anything by Ernst Mayr, but I didn't search specifically for this). The discussions resulted in a case being introduced in 1953 (BZN 10) proposing the restoration, in hole or in part, of the First Reviser Principle.
- The Copenhagen Congress, held in August 1953, restored it entirely.

So, there were indeed a couple of years around the middle of the 20th C, during which page precedence was the official rule.
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Old Tuesday 10th November 2015, 07:40   #61
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Anthracothorax

Quote:
Originally Posted by Melanie View Post
Zootaxa 3957 (1): 143–150 (13 May 2015)
Classification of the Polytminae (Aves: Trochilidae)
J. V. REMSEN JR., F. GARY STILES & JIMMY A. MCGUIRE

Abstract

TiF Update November 9
The genus Eulampis (Boie 1831) has been replaced by Anthracothorax (Boie 1831) due to the first reviser action of Remsen et al. (2015).
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Old Saturday 12th December 2015, 20:38   #62
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Stefan Abrahamczyk and Susanne S. Renner. The temporal build-up of hummingbird/plant mutualisms in North America and temperate South America. BMC Evolutionary Biology 2015, 15:104.

[PDF]

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Old Monday 18th January 2016, 09:18   #63
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Polytmus theresiae

Matos, M. V., Borges, S. H., d'Horta, F. M., Cornelius, C., Latrubesse, E., Cohn-Haft, M. and Ribas, C. C. (2016), Comparative Phylogeography of Two Bird Species, Tachyphonus phoenicius (Thraupidae) and Polytmus theresiae (Trochilidae), Specialized in Amazonian White-sand Vegetation. Biotropica, 48: 110–120. doi: 10.1111/btp.12292

[Abstract]
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Old Wednesday 3rd February 2016, 09:40   #64
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Sonne et al 2016

Sonne et al 2016. High proportion of smaller ranged hummingbird species coincides with ecological specialization across the Americas. Proc R Soc B 283(1824): 20152512. [abstract]
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Old Sunday 21st February 2016, 23:04   #65
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Gary R. Graves, Donna L. Dittmann, and Steven W. Cardiff (2016) Diagnoses of hybrid hummingbirds (Aves: Trochilidae). 17. Documentation of the intrageneric hybrid (Archilochus colubris × Archilochus alexandri). Proceedings of the Biological Society of Washington: April 2016, Vol. 129, No. 1, pp. 1-9.

[Abstract]
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Old Sunday 20th March 2016, 07:24   #66
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Ecuadorian Hillstar

Rodríguez Saltosa & Bonaccorso 2016. Understanding the evolutionary history of a high Andean endemic: the Ecuadorian hillstar (Oreotrochilus chimborazo). Neotrop Biodivers 2(1): 37–50. [abstract] [article & pdf]

Heynen & Boesman 2015 (HBW Alive).

(With thanks to Carlos Rodríguez for reporting on NEOORN.)

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Old Sunday 20th March 2016, 09:30   #67
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Sonne et al 2016 pdf

Quote:
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Sonne et al 2016. High proportion of smaller ranged hummingbird species coincides with ecological specialization across the Americas. Proc R Soc B 283(1824): 20152512. [abstract]
Now open access...

Sonne et al 2016. [pdf]
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Old Thursday 14th April 2016, 02:11   #68
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Gary R. Graves, Donna L. Dittmann, and Steven W. Cardiff (2016) Diagnoses of hybrid hummingbirds (Aves: Trochilidae). 17. Documentation of the intrageneric hybrid (Archilochus colubris × Archilochus alexandri). Proceedings of the Biological Society of Washington: April 2016, Vol. 129, No. 1, pp. 1-9.

Abstract
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Old Tuesday 31st May 2016, 10:44   #69
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Xantus’ hummingbird

Cristina González-Rubio, Francisco J. García-De León, Ricardo Rodríguez-Estrella. Phylogeography of endemic Xantus’ hummingbird (Hylocharis xantusii) show a different history of vicariance in the Baja California Peninsula. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution. In Press, Accepted Manuscript, Available online 31 May 2016.

[abstract]
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Old Wednesday 8th June 2016, 15:54   #70
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter Kovalik View Post
Matos, M. V., Borges, S. H., d'Horta, F. M., Cornelius, C., Latrubesse, E., Cohn-Haft, M. and Ribas, C. C. (2016), Comparative Phylogeography of Two Bird Species, Tachyphonus phoenicius (Thraupidae) and Polytmus theresiae (Trochilidae), Specialized in Amazonian White-sand Vegetation. Biotropica, 48: 110–120. doi: 10.1111/btp.12292

[Abstract]
Temporarily [free access]
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Old Thursday 7th July 2016, 17:35   #71
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Colibri cyanotus

Quote:
Originally Posted by Melanie View Post
Zootaxa 3957 (1): 143–150 (13 May 2015)
Classification of the Polytminae (Aves: Trochilidae)
J. V. REMSEN JR., F. GARY STILES & JIMMY A. MCGUIRE

Abstract
IOC Update Diary July 7

Accept split of Lesser Violetear
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Old Sunday 10th July 2016, 05:24   #72
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Colibri cyanotus

Quote:
Originally Posted by Melanie View Post
Zootaxa 3957 (1): 143–150 (13 May 2015)
Classification of the Polytminae (Aves: Trochilidae)
J. V. REMSEN JR., F. GARY STILES & JIMMY A. MCGUIRE

Abstract
TiF Update July 9, 2016

Violetears: The Green Violetear, Colibri thalassinus, has been split into Mexican Violetear, Colibri thalassinus, and Lesser Violetear, Colibri cyanotus based on Remsen et al. (2015).
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Old Sunday 17th July 2016, 02:18   #73
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A paper that does not seem to have been mentioned, and which would fit equally well in a thread on general speciation or species richness. With thanks to Karl Berg who posted at NEOORN:

Quote:
High proportion of smaller ranged hummingbird species coincides with ecological specialization across the Americas
Jesper Sonne, Ana M. Martín González, Pietro K. Maruyama, Brody Sandel, Jeferson Vizentin-Bugoni, Matthias Schleuning, Stefan Abrahamczyk, Ruben Alarcón, Andréa C. Araujo, Francielle P. Araújo, Severino Mendes de Azevedo, Jr, Andrea C. Baquero, Peter A. Cotton, Tanja Toftemark Ingversen, Glauco Kohler, Carlos Lara, Flor Maria Guedes Las-Casas, Adriana O. Machado, Caio Graco Machado, María Alejandra Maglianesi, Alan Cerqueira Moura, David Nogués-Bravo, Genilda M. Oliveira, Paulo E. Oliveira, Juan Francisco Ornelas, Licléia da Cruz Rodrigues, Liliana Rosero-Lasprilla, Ana Maria Rui, Marlies Sazima, Allan Timmermann, Isabela Galarda Varassin, Zhiheng Wang, Stella Watts, Jon Fjeldså, Jens-Christian Svenning, Carsten Rahbek, and Bo Dalsgaard
Proc. R. Soc. B 283:20152512; doi:10.1098/rspb.2015.2512 (published February 3, 2016)
http://rspb.royalsocietypublishing.o.../1824/20152512


Abstract

Ecological communities that experience stable climate conditions have been speculated to preserve more specialized interspecific associations and have higher proportions of smaller ranged species (SRS). Thus, areas with disproportionally large numbers of SRS are expected to coincide geographically with a high degree of community-level ecological specialization, but this suggestion remains poorly supported with empirical evidence. Here, we analysed data for hummingbird resource specialization, range size, contemporary climate, and Late Quaternary climate stability for 46 hummingbird–plant mutualistic networks distributed across the Americas, representing 130 hummingbird species (ca 40% of all hummingbird species). We demonstrate a positive relationship between the proportion of SRS of hummingbirds and community-level specialization, i.e. the division of the floral niche among coexisting hummingbird species. This relationship remained strong even when accounting for climate, furthermore, the effect of SRS on specialization was far stronger than the effect of specialization on SRS, suggesting that climate largely influences specialization through species' range-size dynamics. Irrespective of the exact mechanism involved, our results indicate that communities consisting of higher proportions of SRS may be vulnerable to disturbance not only because of their small geographical ranges, but also because of their high degree of specialization.
Niels
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Old Thursday 24th November 2016, 11:28   #74
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Ecuadorian Hillstar

Oleas, Harvey, Rodríguez-Saltos, Bonaccorso. 2017. Isolation and characterisation of 11 microsatellite loci in the Ecuadorian Hillstar Oreotrochilus chimborazo. Ardeola 64(1):xx-xx.
[abstract]
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Old Friday 25th November 2016, 23:06   #75
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Discosura letitiae

Was there ever a DNA analysis to clarify the validity of Discosura letitiae?
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