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HBWAlive Key; mission accomplished or mission impossible?

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Old Monday 14th October 2019, 08:34   #326
l_raty
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-inus is an adjectival suffix (a variant of -ianus, -anus, etc.), which can mean "pertaining to", "looking like", and other similar things. An adjectival name formed with this suffix could be descriptive (accipitrinus, -a, -um, "hawk-like"), could be a toponym (pomarinus, -a, -um, "from Pomerania", cf. the eagle), could indicate a type of habitat (alpinus, -a, -um, alpine, etc.), or be an eponym (alexandrinus, -a, -um, "of Alexander the Great", cf. the parakeet). But it's a suffix that is normally added to a noun/name, not to a verbal stem.
-rinus can also be a latinisation of Greek -ρινος (-rhinos, "-nosed"; as in pomarinus, -a, -um, in the case of the skua) -- but I don't think this is a very likely explanation in the present case.

I cannot say what Behle had in mind which he did not explain, but it would strike me as a bit strange to propose, for a subspecies, a name being a latinization of the word acting as a vernacular generic name for the group of species to which the species that subspecies belongs to, belongs.
I'd rather expect some reference to a peculiarity of the ssp itself, in the present case perhaps either its very brown or 'foxed' colour, or its range... But an etymology of garrinus resulting in this type of meaning eludes me.

PS -- I now note that throughout the paper fortuitus is misspelled 'fortuitous' (cf. English fortuitious ?), which may indicate that a fully perfect Latin is not necessarily to be expected.

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Old Saturday 19th October 2019, 06:27   #327
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shanbu ... or shanhu!?

Regarding the missing "shanbu" ( simply as I cannot find an OD of any bird what-so ever, by this name, with this particular spelling, anywhere) ...

shanbu (? ... which, in my mind, ought to be; shanhu), at least as in "[Turdus] Shanhu" [sic] GMELIN 1789 (OD here), same spelling in the Edition kept in BHL (here). Or are those both typos, alt. (Printers) mistake/s? Or erroneous Editons?

Compare with today's HBW Alive Key entry:
Quote:
shanbu
Etymology undiscovered; probably from a Chinese name for the laughingthrushes; "107. TURDUS. ... Shanbu. 41. T. mento, gula et area oculorum nigris, litura ad aures magna alba, reliquo capite, cum jugulo, pectore et abdomine griseis, dorso et alis ex virescente fuscis. Black faced Thrush. Lath. Syn. II. I. p. 37. n. 36. Habitat in Sinae silvis frequens, insectis utplurimum victitans, merulae magnitudine. Rostrum atrum; pedes fusci." (J. Gmelin 1789, Systema Naturae, I (ii), 814) (syn. Dryonastes chinensis).
And the Key's cross-reference: "shanhu ► shanbu" ...!?

James, to me it looks like it ought to be the other way around. Shouldn't it be: shanbu ► shanhu ...?!

Or?

/Björn
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Last edited by Calalp : Saturday 19th October 2019 at 06:41. Reason: blue
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Old Saturday 19th October 2019, 07:01   #328
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Maybe a bit foolish (and against better judgement), but here's yet another try on garrinus ...

For whatever it is worth; there's a (today invalid) US spider "Cicurina garrina" (in Agelenidae) CHAMBERLIN 1919 (here), [nowadays a synonym of C. robusta SIMON 1886, today in Hahniidae], from Upper Montane areas of Utah, (here, p.114, and here), which is similar (in name ) to the alternate (more recent) name of this ssp. Poecile atricapilla/atricapillus "garrina".

If the subspecific name (of the Chickadee/Titmouse) was altered, shouldn't someone (whomever changed it) reasonably know what kind of name they/he/she were altering?

Also note that the same Chamberlin established the generic name (Garrina) in 1915, on the Central American Centipedes Garrina ochra (in Geophilidae), here.

Any of it makes sense? Any other similarities? Like their colour, or their claws ..?!?

Hopefully of some use.

/Björn (truly, simply fumbling about in the dark on this one)

PS. But remember, we do have the (babbling/Babbler) generic name Garritornis, coined by Iredale, in 1956.
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Old Saturday 19th October 2019, 07:38   #329
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Shanhu ... part II

Ouups, I almost forgot the most relevant, second part (the second page, in my notes) of my piece/contribution/attempt on shanhu (in post #327) – the very topic of this whole forum; the etymology part.

If we widen the scope slightly and look at the OD of the true Identity of this synonym; today's (hard-to-place) Black-throated Laughingthrush (Ianthocincla/Dryonastes/Garrulax) Pterorhinus chinensis SCOPOLI 1791 ("OD"? here), as "LANIUS (chinensis) fuscescens; capito nigro, ... " (though, if truly a bi- or trinomina, in this text, is all beyond me). In any case, no local name given, nor any other possible explanation (at least not that I can tell).

However, in Thomas Pennant's book THE VIEW OF INDIA EXTRA GANGEM, CHINA AND JAPAN (vol.3, from 1800) [a k a The view of Hindoostan ..., (which in fact only is the title/s for vol. 1 and 2, from 1798)], we find that this is: "The Shan-hu of the Chinese" [here]

Thereby, it´s an Autochthonym. It wasn't trickier than that.

Well, that's about it, at least on Gmelin's "[Turdus] Shanhu".

Enjoy!

Björn

PS. Anyone feel like owning one, having one at home?
If you're in the vicinity of Hong Kong, you will find a:
"San Hu (Black Throated Laughing Thrush) For Sale"!
[here]

On the same page also written either "Sanhu", "sanhu" or "sanwu" ...
--

Last edited by Calalp : Saturday 19th October 2019 at 07:53. Reason: #327, not 237
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Old Saturday 19th October 2019, 08:57   #330
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Thanks Björn,
This name reinforces the fact that we should always go back to the original source. In this case, Latham's 1783, General Synopsis, II (1), where, like Pennant after him, the name Shan-hu is referred to. However, since Gmelin, although misreading the name from a casual glance, wrote shanbu I shall keep that as the header.
Shanbu amended, duly acknowledged.
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Old Saturday 19th October 2019, 08:58   #331
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Calalp View Post
If the subspecific name (of the Chickadee/Titmouse) was altered, shouldn't someone (whomever changed it) reasonably know what kind of name they/he/she were altering?
The person who altered it must have assumed it was adjectival, and probably assumed it ended up in the suffix -inus, -ina, -inum. But (s)he would not necessarily have known anything about the first part of the name. Sometimes such assumptions are made without any other base than a simple guess, though. (Cf. caixana, which Hartert assumed "had to" end in -anus, -ana, -anum.)
I find it intriguing that the spider is from Utah too. A mere coincidence, or...?
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Old Saturday 19th October 2019, 09:26   #332
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Quote:
Originally Posted by James Jobling View Post
Thanks Björn,
... However, since Gmelin, although misreading the name from a casual glance, wrote shanbu I shall keep that as the header.
....
You're welcome James, but ... I don't understand where Gmelin (even if "from a casual glance") wrote it "shanbu" ... ?!

At least that's not how it's written in "his" Systema naturae of 1789. Compare with the attached excerpts (from the two "OD"s linked to in #327). Surely there's no b in those ones.

Wasn't/isn't that the OD?

Björn

PS. Either way; the reference to Latham 1783 (prior to Gmelin) sure made the case even stronger!
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Old Saturday 19th October 2019, 09:50   #333
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Quote:
Originally Posted by l_raty View Post
...
I find it intriguing that the spider is from Utah too. A mere coincidence, or...?
I was intrigued by that as well, Laurent ...

I have also noted that Garrin seems to be a fairly Common name in Utah (both as given name and surname). Same goes for the (given) name Garrie.

But none found close, or in connection, to William Behle.

/B
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Old Saturday 19th October 2019, 10:41   #334
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But it's "Shanbu" here: https://books.google.com/books?id=z_...=turdus shanbu

Also:...which is becoming quite strange, as these should in principle be the same edition (Georg. Emanuel. Beer, Leipzig, 1788-93 -- this is the edition that 'counts').

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Old Saturday 19th October 2019, 16:34   #335
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Calalp View Post
At least that's not how it's written in "his" Systema naturae of 1789. Compare with the attached excerpts (from the two "OD"s linked to in #327). Surely there's no b in those ones.

Wasn't/isn't that the OD?
Both links are to the Lyon edition (JB Delamollière, 1789-1796; check the title page of vol. I of the set), which is later than the Leipzig edition (1788-1793), thus actually, no, these are not the OD. The lettering used here was a bit different -- see, i.a., 'Thrush', while in (the two versions of) the Leipzig ed., it was 'Thruſh', with a long s.
But this does not solve the problem, as there are two apparent versions of the Leipzig edition of Part II with different spellings. Without knowing which one of these two versions was first, we cannot know what the actual OS was.

(For what it's worth: the 'ſh' in 'Thruſh' also seems consistently tighter (the ſ being closer to the h) in the 'Shanbu' Leipzig volume than in the 'Shanhu' Leipzig volume. The less tight version (= 'Shanhu' volume) may be more in line with the rest of the work, see e.g. 'ſhrew' [here] in Part I; 'Blackfiſh' [here] in Part III. I see no such difference between parts I and III of the two sets.)

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Old Sunday 20th October 2019, 13:25   #336
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Originally Posted by l_raty View Post
...which is becoming quite strange, as these should in principle be the same edition (Georg. Emanuel. Beer, Leipzig, 1788-93 -- this is the edition that 'counts').
All the differences in name spelling seem to be due to errors in the "Shanbu" volume, which are absent/corrected in the "Shanhu" volume.
Note there is another b/h confusion among the cases listed above (bonariensis/honariensis), but here the 'h' variant would be a demonstrable inadvertent mistake due to "Habitat in Bonaria" appearing in the text.
It seems quite likely to me that all these problems (incl. Shanbu vs. Shanhu) are plain typographer's errors. (Rather than Gmelin himself having misread any name from a casual glance at the original works.)


Online copies of the "Shanhu" volume:Online copies of the "Shanbu" volume:So both variants seem widespread. All the above copies are attributed to the original Beer/Leipzig edition.

---------------

OK, I'll give up on this (for now at least).

As I see it, either a typo-free volume was produced to correct an original volume that had too many errors in it (and thus Shanbu is the OS); or the publisher ran out of copies of this particular volume at some point, and produced an undeclared "quick and dirty" new edition (with many typos) in order to remain able to sell complete sets of the work (and thus Shanhu is the OS). I'd tend to lean towards the second option, but I can't really tell for sure.

If anyone knows more about this case, I'd be interested.

If "Shanbu" and "Shanhu" in "the Leipzig edition" are given equal precedence, the Lyon edition (which has the same authors) could presumably be viewed as having established "Shanhu" as the correct OS.

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Old Monday 21st October 2019, 12:42   #337
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OK, I'll give up on this (for now at least).
I can't, apparently... (Sorry if this is becoming boring.)

There are actually differences between the respective Parts I and Parts III of the two BHL sets as well -- not just between the Parts II. (I see no differences (so far) between the respective Parts IV and Parts V.)
The process may have been more careful in Part I than in Part II: on a quick check, I found no differences between the names used for birds in both versions. But there is a number of instances where names are printed in the margin differently in the two versions -- e.g., on one line in one version, on two lines in the other -- which clearly proves that the text received two distinct typesettings. For example:

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Old Tuesday 22nd October 2019, 08:05   #338
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Boring, Laurent? No way. There might be bits and pieces, cases that I don't understand ... but boring. Nope.

Even if a bit short of time I had a quick look at this odd case ...

Note that there are examples of names being written on one versus two lines also in volume 1, Part 2 (in the Beer/Leipzig Edition/s), see page 700: cartha-gena vs carthage-na, or on p.706: ludovici-ana vs ludovicia-na. There's also an "alba" (in Italics) vs (a non-italic) "alba", on p.780, clearly indicating (on top of all earlier said) that we're looking at two different works/books.

To me this, and all the other facts presented in this thread, talks in favor of the "Shanhu" spelling/Edition/version. [From the Beer/Leipzig Edition, that is (alt. presumably, possibly also, equally the Lyon one)]

I'll take a deeper look at this most peculiar case, comparing the different editions/version, the coming week-end (or whenever time allows).

Björn
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Old Friday 25th October 2019, 04:42   #339
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I agree with Björn. Very interesting I only wish I could add something. Sherborn lists Shanhu and refers to Gray. So Gray's Genera lists Shanhu.
https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/...e/475/mode/1up .
Refers to Le Vaillant T. 43.
https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/...e/224/mode/1up . And Sonnerat?
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Old Friday 25th October 2019, 08:59   #340
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I agree with Björn. Very interesting I only wish I could add something. Sherborn lists Shanhu and refers to Gray. So Gray's Genera lists Shanhu.
https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/...e/475/mode/1up .
Refers to Le Vaillant T. 43.
https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/...e/224/mode/1up . And Sonnerat?
Mark [glad to see you back here on the Etymology forum], Gray's listed "Sonn. Voy. t.107.", is a reference to Sonnerat's Voyage aux Indes orientales et a la Chine ... Tome second (from 1782), and to t./tabula/plate 107, where this bird was depicted as "Petit Geay de la Chine" (here, and its enclosed text; "Le petit Geay de la Chine", here).

However, this text/work doesn't mention any local name (at least not that I can find), neither a shanhu nor a shanbu (or the proper version Shan-hu), thereby, in this topic (the etymology itself), it's of less concern.

Björn

PS. If you necessarily feel like adding something ... maybe you can find an additional piece regarding "Irene Morden" [a k a Irene (Shields) Hambright Morden?], in the on-going thread ireneae ... ? You've repeatedly shown yourself very capable finding your way through various US records/censuses/archives. To me, it looks like Martin is on the right track, but he (and James) seems to be in need of some sort of confirmation, a last piece of link/connection. I'm pretty sure they would appreciate some help regarding Mrs. Morden.
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Old Saturday 26th October 2019, 23:12   #341
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The Gmelin reference to Latham does not make sense to me and refers to a heron. Edit sorry an Ibis article said v. iii p. 37.
Latham's supplement refers to this bird and the type specimen was in the Leverian Museum. Something about Dr. Fothergill. ? . Dr. John Fothergill.
https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/...e/101/mode/1up .

Maybe the sales catalogue of the Leverians museum mentions the bird? I have a thought that Turton's seven volume 1800 english translation of Gmelin may say something? Turton probably knew Latham.
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Old Monday 28th October 2019, 23:04   #342
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Turton 1800 lists the bird and calls it shanbu with a 'b'.
https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/...e/510/mode/1up .
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Old Tuesday 29th October 2019, 00:08   #343
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Quote:
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The Gmelin reference to Latham does not make sense to me and refers to a heron. Edit sorry an Ibis article said v. iii p. 37.
I assume you ment this Ibis article https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/...ge/48/mode/1up ?

Volume III seems indeed https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/...ge/51/mode/1up Vol. II Part 1.

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Old Sunday 24th November 2019, 08:52   #344
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tigus as in:
• "Ixos tigus" ascribed/credited to "BONAPARTE 1850" (here), with one single reference: "Müll. Mus. Lugd. ..."

... which leads us to Musei Lugdunum (Batavorum) [= Rijksmuseum van Natuurlijke Historie (National Museum of Natural History), in Leiden/Leyden, Netherlands], which takes us onwards ... to this (far later) paper, in Notes from the Leyden Museum (from 1905–1906), which tell us that Bonaparte's "Ixus tigus" was originally described by "S. [Salomon] Müller", in 1834 (though see foot-note), as "Ixos tympanistrigus" [sic]*, in Tijdschrift voor natuurlijke geschiedenis en physiologie, No. 2 [missing in BHL, but found] here**, on p.353. All in Dutch (which leaves me out of the game).

Was it possibly Temminck who coined this name, when he labelled ("etiquetirt") the specimen itself?

However, I've got no idea on the etymology itself, but the Key's theory; " perhaps ... or deliberate a curtailment of ..." seems reasonable. To me this looks like Bonaparte's tigus simply is a short version, or similar (possibly a typo?), of tympanistrigus ... with the r (and possibly also the s?) all lost (if of striga/strigus, striated, of course) ...? At least it could be, couldn't it?

Or is the explanation possibly waiting to be found in Müller's Dutch text?

Who knows?

Björn

PS. Note that the 1905–1906 foot-note, also talks of "das wohlberechtige Genus Bonapartea (a generic name not listed in today's HBW Alive Key), which (as far as I can tell) simply seems to be a typo (alt. a later, unjustified alteration) of Büttikofer's Bonapartia, from 1896 (here). Thereby, no need (for anyone intrigued by it) to post "Bonapartea" in the thread Names lacking in the Key.

________________________________________________________________
*nec (not) "Brachypus tympanistrigus Bp.", hence, possibly simply an emendation by Bonaparte himself.
Note that this name wasn't/isn't written "tympanistrugus", as quoted in today's Key. Typo, James?
Compare with today's Spot-necked Bulbul Pycnonotus tympanistrigus (Müller, S, 1836), OD above.

**Title page does say: "1835". And without umlaut in the Surname Muller!

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Old Sunday 24th November 2019, 11:54   #345
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In Mullers text no reveal from an explanation.
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Old Sunday 24th November 2019, 18:27   #346
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In Mullers text no reveal from an explanation.
Wondering if he wasn't actually using 'tympanum' in the modern (anatomical) sense...?
(Cf. "aan de zijden van het achterhoofd staat eene lichtgele vlak, die tot beneden de ooren loopt, en op deze wijze de naakte deelen om de oogen, van achteren bepaalt".)
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Old Monday 25th November 2019, 05:24   #347
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tigus

James, shouldn't the first description from 1835 be provided in the Key?

Just a thought ...

Björn
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Old Monday 25th November 2019, 09:22   #348
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"Ixos tigus Mull." is a manuscript name which I am unable to find. Only Bonaparte 1850 validates the name.
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Old Monday 25th November 2019, 13:26   #349
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Obviously, a lot of things were mixed up by Bonaparte 1850... -
Quote:
* 11. Ixos tigus, Müll. Mus. Lugd. ex Sumatra. Similis praeced. viridis et subtus squamatus; sed minor, et macula auriculari flava.
The diagnosis (= "like the previous one, green and scaled below; but smaller and with a yellow ear patch") is compatible with Ixos tympanistrigus as described by Müller on p. 353 of the 1835 volume of Tijdschr. nat. gesch. physiol. But this publication is not cited and the asterisk indicates a name intended to be new (this is explicitly stated in [the intoductive text] "asterisco notavi nova genera et species" -- "with an asterisk I have marked new genera and species"), so we probably have no other choice than to accept tigus as a separately introduced name. (Even though a corruption of Müller's name -- used for the same bird -- seems likely.)

Quote:
12. Ixos tympanistrigus, Müll. (cristatellus, Mus. Lugd. - Pycnonotus tympanistrigus, Gr.) Tijdschr. 1835. p. 353. ex Sumatra. Rufo-fuscus; subtus albidus, pectore cinerascente, crisso flavescente; capite vix cristato: rectricibus extimis apice albis.
Here, the name was not indicated as new -- it was attributed to Müller on p. 353 of the 1835 volume of Tijdschr. nat. gesch. physiol. But there is no way that the diagnosis (= "rufous-brown; whitish below, with greyish breast and yellowish crissum; with the head barely crested: with the outer tail feathers white at the tip") could be compatible with the bird actually described by Müller. (It is indeed compatible with Brachypus eutilotus Jardine & Selby 1837 [OD], as suggested by Finsch 1905 -- link in Björn's post #344 above.) I would usually regard such a name as a mere misapplication, not as a separately available name.

(But the specimens at the origin of both Brachypus tigus Bonaparte and "B. tympanistrigus Bonaparte" are treated as types in the Naturalis collection -- as if both names were available.)
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Old Saturday 30th November 2019, 09:01   #350
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chavaria (and Chavaria)

chavaria as in "[Parra] Chavaria" LINNAEUS 1766 (OD here), with two references to "Jacquin", which leads us to the Dutch/Austrian nobleman (Freiherr) Nikolaus Joseph von Jacquin (1727–1817).

In a letter (all in Latin) from von Jacquin himself, to the great Linnaeus (now we're talking of returning to a truly Original source!), dated 2nd of January 1765, sent from "Schemnitz", [which I assume ought to be today's Banská Štiavnica, in Slovakia?], we find the following text about the bird in question, which starts (and continues, in parts) just about identical to the description in Linaeus's OD [my blue bolds]:
Quote:
Avis habitat in fluviis, inundatis, et lacubus vicinis flumini Cinu 30 leucis Carthagena Indica distanti. Incolis et Hispanis vocatur Chavaria. Corpus magnitudine galli gallinacei, a terra altum sesquipede. Collum longum. Cauda brevis. Caput et rostrum conicoincurvum, sordide albescens, maxilla superiore imbricata, sunt Gallinae similia. Crura corporis respectu crassissima et fortia. Genua omnium crasissima nodosaque. Tibiae longae, eoque visae longiores, quod plumis in summa parte tantum obteguntur, flavo-rubrae, etiam crassae. Pedes tetradactyli, digitis flavo-rubris, crassis, adeo longis, ut invicem quam maxime decussent semper, dum incedunt. Forte avis non datur, qui corporis respectu tam longos habet. Corpus, cauda et alae nigricant cum nebulis griseis; minus paulo nigricat venter. Collum atrum plumis veris nullis, sed lana curta densaque obtegitur totum. Simili lana, sed nivea, gaudent inferior pars capitis sub rostro et tempora ad latitudinem circiter pollicis unius. Ad basin rostri membrana implumis utrinque rubraque ad tempora extenditur, in cujus media parte sunt oculi iride fusca. Frons et occiput plumis ornantur veris corpori concoloribus at paulo minus fuscis. Occipitis infima pars in ipso loco, ubi cessat lana colli, ornatur crista ex duodecim circiter pennis tripollicaribus nigricantibus, respectu loci, unde oriuntur, perpendicularibus, corporis autem respectu decumbentibus. Nares oblongae, apertae, ut oculi utrinque lucem per illas conspicere valeant. Rostro vel unguibus nocere nequeunt. Dedit iis natura alia arma, quae aves rapaces valdopere timent. Calcaria utrinque in alis, ipsis ad illarum articulos duos, subtus gerunt ossea, nuda, durissima, crassa, acuta, semipollicaria, interdum utrinque tria, quae non apparent, nisi quando alas, quas longissimas fortissimasque habent, extendunt. Extensis his, quantum fieri potest, hostem aggrediuntur, et ictibus fortissimis trucidant. Incessus gravis, lentus et difficilis. Volatus facilis, et sat celer. Currere omnino non possunt, nisi simul semi-volent. Sylvestres gramine vescuntur et herbis. Asssuevi illas pani aqua macerato, et Zeae seminibus tusis diuque maceratis; aliud quid assumere noluerunt. Pedes aqua lavare amant. Quando tanguntur manu, cutis, sub plumis etiam lanosa, crepat fortiter ubique. Haec lana densa levitatem conciliat corpori, ita ut perfecte natent, hoc est aquis superemineant, et pedibus digitisque longissimis, qui alias non magis quam gallinarum natatori sunt, motis tamen in aquis progrediantur. Hac longitudine quoque accidit, ut in stagnis herbosis etiam profundis incedere possint. Indi, qui gallinas, anseres similesque aves enutriunt in magno numero, quas postea in foris vendant, in toto Carthagenensi territorio unam Chavariam possidere cicuratam curant. Haec tunc semper cum reliqua gallinarum turba per viciniam pergit. Nunquam has deserit, etsi volare possit, et domum ad vesperam revertitur. Ab homine adulto tunc tangi se patitur, et nemini nocet. Contra puerulos vero se defendit saepius. Aves rapaces ferre nequit et prima illas adoritur. Cum omnis ibidem regio plena sit vulturibus illis, Gallinazo dictis, vid. litteras meas primas de avibus. Illi saepe gallinas auferunt. Has defendunt Chavariae, et simulac vulturem talem appropinquantem conspiciunt (magis enim illi vultures solent ambulare quam volare), ilico occurrunt ipsi, qui raro adventum exspectat suum. Vox clara, alta, sed ingrata. Est avis certe pulcherrima, et habitu ab omnibus a me cognitis diversissima. Collum, caput et pedes adspectu singularia sunt. Novum genus mihi postulare videtur. Tu utere hac descriptione, quam in America ad ipsam avium concinnavi Gallice, hic traducta ad usum tuum. Emi alias pro duobus aureis, alias pro quibusdam obolis, nempe ex arbitrio Indi possidentis. In itinere reduci mare paucas hebdomadas sustinuerunt, puto, longitudine pedum maris motui non resistentes, sed continuis quassatae ictibus: ab 1. Novembris enim ad 26 februarii in mari fui, hyeme et tempestatibus continuis actus. Unde perierunt in itinere omnes.
Translated/explained (in short), by the ALVIN* crew, into:
Quote:
A bird from Grenada, called Chavaria, is very carefully described. It is 1.5 feet tall, and it can be tamed. Jacquin had tried to take some back to Europe with him but they had died during the long voyage that lasted from November 1 to February 26.

[all from here alt. here, the physical letter itself is kept in the Linnean Society of London archive/collection]
The same letter, is also summarized in the fairly recent book Nikolaus Joseph Jacquin’s American Plants, by Santiago Mandriñán (2013), in Appendix II (Jacquin’s American animals), into the (even shorter) sentence, on p.388 (here):
Quote:
On 2 January 1765, continuing his descriptions of animals, Jacquin described a large bird 1.5 feet tall from Grenada, called Chavaria, which was possible to be tamed.
To me it looks like the scientific name "Chavaria" is yet another Autochthonym, based on a local name (indigenous or Spanish, probably the latter), either from Grenada, in the Caribbean (West Indies ), or (most likely) from Colombia (!) ...

If that is what Jacquin's Latin text truly says, of course?

Note that this species isn't found in/on Grenada (at least not today), as it's monotypic and endemic for NW South America (Northern Colombia and North Western Venezuela). On the other hand, if easily tame and domesticated (as well as big and nourishing), it could still have been there (or close) when von Jacquin made his Journey, to and between the Caribbean Islands, and the surrounding coast of South America (in 1755–1759). Or, maybe he heard this name, and picked it up, when he visited the shores of mainland South America?

Compare with the Type location: "lakes near Río Sinú, south of Cartagena, Colombia" (according to HBW Alive itself), which to me (not understanding Latin) seems to be in line with what's told in the very start of the OD ...

Also compare with its Spanish Vernacular/Common names (according to Avibase): "Chajá chicagüire, Chavarrí, Chicagüire, Gritón Chicagüire", and, even more local; "Spanish (Colombia): Chavarrí, Chavarria".

Maybe this "blog post" (in Spanish) adds anything, (even if he misspelled it as "Chauna chavarria", a spelling frequently used on the "net") ... !?

However; enjoy

Björn

PS. This would, most likely, also cover the (invalid) generic name Chavaria RAFINESQUE 1815 which (if so) possibly could delete the question mark ("?syn. Chauna"), in today's Key doesn't it? If we'd followed Rafinesque's suggestion/opinion today's Northern (Black-necked) Screamer Chauna chavaria, would/could have been Chavaria chavaria, wouldn't it?

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*ALVIN is a Swedish; " ... platform for the long-term preservation and accessible storage of digitied collections and digital cultural heritage materials".
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