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Names lacking in the Key

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Old Monday 9th October 2017, 12:46   #26
mb1848
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On page 24 of Bonaparte's article about DeLattre's collections in California and Nicuragua he says Call. drovoni is from Guayaquil . Perhaps MM Verreaux had a collecter there named Drovon?
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Old Monday 9th October 2017, 17:49   #27
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"Ainsi, on le voit, le C. Devronis, que nous avons dédié à M. Devron..." (Verreaux 1852) (drovoni of Bonaparte 1854 is a lapsus).
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Old Monday 9th October 2017, 19:13   #28
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Bonaparte's French was sometimes a bit convoluted, and he often passed very quickly over various subjects, which made him hard to follow. It wasn't 'drovoni' (as per Mark) which he said in the Delattre reprint to be from Guayaquil; it was another species that he there tentatively identified as "Call. peruvianus, Lesson". And it was neither 'drovoni' (as per Björn), nor this other species (as per Zimmer), that he later described as masesus; this was still another bird.

[Bonaparte 1854]:
Quote:
Ajoutons [...] au singulier genre Callirhynchus, outre Call. drovoni, Verreaux, une troisième espèce plus petite, à bec pâle, venant de Guayaquil : Minimus, cinereo-subvirens, uropygio concolore : fascia alari alba : rostro pallido. Ne serait-ce pas Call. peruvianus, Lesson?
= Let's add [...] to the peculiar genus Callirhynchus, besides Call. drovoni, Verreaux, a third species, smaller, pale-billed, coming from Guayaquil : [Latin starts] Very small, slightly greenish grey, with the rump of the same colour : with a white wing band : with a pale bill. [Latin ends] Would this not be Call. peruvianus, Lesson?

(Callyrhynchus peruvianus Lesson 1842 is the type of Callyrhynchus Lesson 1842 by original monotypy: [OD].)

[Bonaparte 1856]:
Quote:
La même chose se reproduit dans le genre américain Callirhynchus, Less. L'espèce que nous avons décrite, d'après l'exemplaire du Muséum, n'est nullement l'espèce type dont l'auteur a fait présent, je crois, à un musée de Belgique; j'en ai acquis une nouvelle preuve en étudiant les manuscrits de Lesson , qui contiennent, avec le dessin original de son type, une foule d'autres figures et de renseignements précieux pour la science. Espérons que le Muséum, auquel la famille du défunt offre généreusement une préférence désintéressée, ne laissera pas fuir l'occasion d'acquérir un pareil trésor. MM. Verreaux ont décrit une troisième espèce, sous le nom de Callirhynchus drovoni, et je joins ici la phrase caractéristique d'une quatrième, qui vient d'être déposée dans notre grand établissement national avec d'autres Fringillides non moins précieux.
» CALLIRHYNCHUS MASESUS, Bp. Majusculus; cinereo-virescens ; subtus albidus ; gula pectoreque nigris, maculis binis jugularibus albis : speculo alari albo : cauda ex toto cinerea : rostro, subtus praesertim, albicante. »
= The same thing happens again in the American genus Callirhynchus, Less. The species that we have described, after the specimen of the Muséum, is not the type species which the author presented, I think, to a museum of Belgium; I acquired a new proof of this by studying Lesson's manuscripts, which include, along with the original drawing of his type, many other figures and pieces of information valuable to science. Let's hope that the Muséum, to which the family of the deceased generously offers a selfless preference, will not let the chance to acquire such a treasure pass. Messrs. Verreaux described a third species, under the name of Callirhynchus drovoni, and I add here the characteristic phrase of a fourth one, which was just deposited in our great national institution along with other, no less precious, Fringillids.
[Latin starts] » CALLIRHYNCHUS MASESUS, Bp. Fairly large ; greenish grey ; whitish below ; with the throat and the breast black, with two white jugular patches : with a white wing speculum : with the tail wholly grey : with the bill, particularly below, whitish. » [Latin ends]

Note that 'drovoni' could never be available as the name of a new species from either of these two publications, as the bird is nowhere described.

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Old Monday 9th October 2017, 21:54   #29
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Fair enough guys, thanks for explaining, sorry for wasting your time.

Mea culpa

Björn

PS. Sigh! I really should have learnt by now; to stay away, simply stay away, from those French text! ... I will try. No guarantees.
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Old Monday 9th October 2017, 23:42   #30
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Björn I think it is worth asking the question. In a 1889 Mémoires de la Société zoologique de France volume 3, it mentions M. Devron having a specimen of a hybrid Perdix. When I followed the cite to Degland et Gerbe's Ornithologie Europeenne he is refered to as M. Drevon.
https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/...ge/84/mode/1up .
It mentions the bird was recu de Grenoble which I do not think means M. Drevon is from there. So I want birth and death dates on M. Drevon along with a snappy bio as soon as possible!
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Old Tuesday 10th October 2017, 00:07   #31
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This is not good in a 1948 document it says: Unfortunately, the name of Mr. Drevon has not left a trace among the traveling naturalists or ... only two specimens of this bird: "... one in my own collection, and another in that of M. Verreaux of Paris.
https://books.google.com/books?id=y_...U5A3MQ6AEIJjAA .
https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/...ge/59/mode/1up .
So actually Bonaparte's spelling is closer than Verreaux's??
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Old Tuesday 10th October 2017, 08:48   #32
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Devron ... Drovon ... Drevon!?

That could be an explanation of why we know so little of these names!

At least the guy behind the latter version collected other animals than the "Callirhynchus" Seedeater*, here.

More than that (and this) I know nothing of him.

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*"Callirhynchus" = "Callyrhynchus" = Sporophila
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Old Tuesday 10th October 2017, 09:40   #33
l_raty
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mb1848 View Post
When I followed the cite to Degland et Gerbe's Ornithologie Europeenne he is refered to as M. Drevon.
https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/...ge/84/mode/1up .
It mentions the bird was recu de Grenoble which I do not think means M. Drevon is from there.
Indeed: it's the bird that would come from Grenoble; without being really explicit, the sentence might be read as implying that it had to travel to reach Drevon, hence that the latter resided elsewhere (at this time).

OTOH, Bouteille 1843 [here] mentioned a bird specimen (a white yellowhammer) that he said was "chez M. Drevon, à Grenoble" = at M. Drevon's, in Grenoble. In Vol. 2 of the same work [here], Bouteille cited Drevon again, adding that he was "gantier" = a glover... But this was almost a quarter of a century earlier than Degland & Gerbe's work, and might as well be entirely unrelated to what these authors reported, I think.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mb1848 View Post
This is not good in a 1948 document it says: Unfortunately, the name of Mr. Drevon has not left a trace among the traveling naturalists or ... only two specimens of this bird: "... one in my own collection, and another in that of M. Verreaux of Paris.
https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/...ge/59/mode/1up .
In this work (Berlioz 1948), Drevon's name is quoted from the registers of the collections of the Muséum, which said that a particular hummingbird specimen had been "acquis par échange de M. Drevon" = acquired by exchange from M. Drevon in 1864.
The label of the same specimen was also quoted by Simon 1923 [here] as reading: "Ornismyia, Eucephala smaragdocœrulea Gould, acquis en échange de M. Drevon en 1864, Brésil." = Ornismyia, Eucephala smaragdocœrulea Gould, acquired in exchange from M. Drevon in 1864, Brazil.

In [Google Books], several publications from the years 1850-60 mention a Drevon, naturaliste, à Paris.

A (less successful?) colleague of Parzudaki?

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Old Tuesday 10th October 2017, 09:45   #34
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Well done Mark! One small step forward ...

Today's updated HBW Alive Key:
Quote:
devronis
Although dedicated to 'M. Devron' by J. Verreaux 1852, this is probably a misspelling for M. Drevon (fl. 1860) French ornithologist, collector. The eponym was spelled drovoni by Bonaparte 1856 (Mark Brown in litt.) (subsp. Sporophila peruviana).
But James, why -56? And not -54?
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Old Tuesday 10th October 2017, 10:36   #35
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Jules Verreaux himself spelled the name drevonis in 1869 [here].
(With this, I'm not even sure the 'probably' is still justified. Well done to Mark from me as well.)

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Old Tuesday 10th October 2017, 13:34   #36
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The HBW [very] Alive Key now gives us:
Quote:
devronis
Although dedicated to 'M. Devron' by J. Verreaux 1852, this is probably a misspelling for M. Drevon (fl. 1860) French naturalist, collector. The eponym was spelled drovoni by Bonaparte 1854 and Bonaparte 1856, and drevonis by J. Verreaux 1869 (Mark Brown and Laurent Raty in litt.) (subsp. Sporophila peruviana).
... who "fl." (flourished, was alive) all the way until at least 1864 (see the latter link in Post #32, alt. Laurent's in #33).

Well done, guys! Now I feel less guilty bringing it up
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Old Tuesday 10th October 2017, 18:05   #37
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The HBW [very] Alive Key! Thanks everyone.
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Old Sunday 26th November 2017, 16:42   #38
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Another one missing in today's Key

The generic name Davisona MATHEWS 1935 (here) replacement (as pre-occupied) "for Hydrornis Milne-Edwards, 1867, not Blyth 1843."

Named for ... I can only guess! Who knows?

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Old Sunday 26th November 2017, 18:32   #39
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Hydrornis Milne-Edwards, 1867, is a fossil, therefore so is its replacement name Davisona Mathews, 1935.
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Old Sunday 26th November 2017, 20:02   #40
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Sorry, James, I should have checked Hydrornis by Milne-Edwards 1867, before posting! And that's obviously why Davisona wasn't, isn't (and shouldn't be) included in the Key. I should have suspected that.

Mea culpa!

Björn
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Old Monday 5th February 2018, 08:47   #41
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Laurent's post # 49 in thread "diagnosis not seen" for genus names in the Key A through S (here) also gave us a completely new name!

In the "new" subspecies "Gouldæornis gouldiæ westra subsp. nov." ... as westra in not found in today's HBW Alive Key. Well done!

As I understand it, a synonym of today's monotypic Gouldian Finch (Amadina/Poephila/Erythrura) Chloebia gouldiae GOULD 1844.

What westra means? I have nothing but an idea ...

Syntypes in AMNH (2013), see pp. 113-114, here.

From West? In Mathews's usual, somewhat unorthodox manner of coining scientific names? All the types originated from the Napier Broome Bay area, in Western Australia. All collected by G. F. Hill ...

Another one in the long line of names similar to: westralasiana / westralensis / westraliensis / westralis ...?

In 1948 its Range was:
Quote:
"Northern Australia. In Western Australia only in the Kimberley Division"

[here]
Just a thought. Who knows?

Björn

PS. It might be wort having a look at that Journal, in full, after all ...
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Old Wednesday 7th March 2018, 15:26   #42
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• "C. [Certhia] Sparrmanni" SUCKOW 1800 ... see recent thread in the Bird Taxonomy and Nomenclature Forum (here).
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Old Monday 12th March 2018, 08:06   #43
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Here´s an addition to the list of birds commemorating Solander ...

• "Macronectes giganteus solanderi" MATHEWS 1912, here [syn. monotypic Macronectes giganteus GMELIN 1789]
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Old Monday 12th March 2018, 10:30   #44
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Calalp View Post
PS. It might be wort having a look at that Journal, in full, after all ...
I won't post a full pdf here, as it is my understanding that the work (published 1923) is still under copyright. The new species-group names introduced in this paper are:
  • Samuela cinnamomea todmordeni – “Type, Todmorden, Central Australia.”
  • Calamanthus fuliginosus obscurior – […] “much darker” [...]
  • Magnamytis kimberleyi – “Type, Kimberley, North-west Australia.”
  • Colluricincla rufiventris carteri – no obvious clue in OD.
  • Cracticus nigrogularis coongani – “Type, Coongan River, Mid-west Australia.”
  • Aphelooephala pectoralis todmordeni – “Type, Todmorden, Central Australia.”
  • Neositta albata ramsayi – “Differs from N. a. albata (Ramsay) in” [etc.]
  • Cormobates minor northi – no obvious link to AJ North in OD (but “Type, Barron River, North Queensland.”)
  • Zosterops australasiae edwini – no obvious clue in OD.
  • Zosterops lutea headlandi – “Type, Point Headland, North Mid-west Australia.”
  • Pardalotinus melanocephalus pilbarra – “Type, Pilbarra Gold Fields, Mid-west Australia.”
  • Nesopardalotus quadragintus rex – “Type, King Island, Bass Straits.”
  • Melithreptus laetior northi – no obvious link to AJ North in OD (but “Type, Western Northern Territory.”)
  • Lichmera indistincta yorki – “Type, York, West Australia.”
  • Lichmera indistincta perthi – “Type, Perth, West Australia.”
  • Lichmera indistincta milligani – no obvious clue in OD.
  • Sacramela keartlandi cloatesensis – “Type, Point Cloates, Mid-west Australia.”
  • Ptilotula penicillata centralia – “Type, Central Australia.”
  • Phylidonyris pyrrhoptera mixta – no obvious clue in OD.
  • Meliornis novaehollandiae queenslandicus – “Type, Queensland.”
  • Meliornis novaehollandiae campbelli – no obvious clue in OD.
  • Meliornis novaehollandiae intermedius – no obvious clue in OD.
  • Coleia carunculata clelandi – no obvious clue in OD.
  • Coleia carunculata perthi – “Type, Perth, West Australia.”
  • Anthochaera chrysoptera albani – “Type, Albany, South-west Australia.”
  • Acanthagenys rufogularis augusta – “Type, Port Augusta, South Australia.”
  • Neophilemon orientalis confusus – no obvious clue in OD.
  • Austranthus australis flindersi – “Type, Flinders Island, Bass Straits.”
  • Zonaeginthus bellus flindersi – “Type, Flinders Island, Bass Straits.”
  • Zonaeginthus bellus tasmanicus – Type, Tasmania.”
  • Zonaeginthus bellus rosinae – no obvious clue in OD.
  • Zonaeginthus boculatus gaimardi – “Differs from Z. o. oculatus (Q. and G.) ” [etc.]
  • Donacola castaneothorax northi – no obvious link to AJ North in OD (but “Type, North Queensland.”)
  • Aegintha temporalis ashbyi – no obvious clue in OD.
  • Gouldaeornis gouldiae westra – “Type, Napier Broome Bay, North-west Australia.”
  • Neopoephila personata hilli – no obvious clue in OD.
  • Ptiloris paradisea queenslandica – “Type, Blackall Ranges, South Queensland.”
  • Corvus cecilae problëema – no obvious clue in OD.
  • Struthidea cimerea dalyi – “Type, Daly Waters, Northern Territory”.
(...With westra in mind, and given Mathews' habit to form names by adding a genitive -i ending to English-language toponyms, I feel obliged to note that the three taxa named northi in this list all have a stated type locality in northern Australia. Hopefully just a coincidence...? [OTOH, on p.43 of the same paper, Mathews conceded that his Acanthiza pusilla northi Mathews 1922 [OD], explicitly dedicated to AJ North, was a junior synonym of A. p. leeuwinensis Campbell 1922: this may conceivably have prompted him to propose other names honouring North. There might also be other untold reasons for this, of course.])

Last edited by l_raty : Monday 12th March 2018 at 14:19. Reason: cloatesensis (not -enis)
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Old Monday 12th March 2018, 18:19   #45
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Thanks Laurent for all this work. Mathews did not make it easy.
Colluricincla rufiventris carteri – no obvious clue in OD. Key: Thomas Carter (1863-1931) English ornithologist, collector, pastoralist, explorer in Australia 1886-1921… syn. Colluricincla harmonica rufiventris
Zosterops australasiae edwini – no obvious clue in OD. Key: Edwin Ashby (1861-1941) English conchologist, ornithologist, settled in Australia, founder member of RAOU (syn. Zosterops lateralis chloronotus).
Aegintha temporalis ashbyi – no obvious clue in OD. Key Edwin Ashby again, syn. Aegintha temporalis

Lichmera indistincta milligani – no obvious clue in OD. Key: Alexander William Milligan (1858-1921) Australian ornithologist, founder member of the RAOU. syn. Lichmera indistincta.
Phylidonyris pyrrhoptera mixta – no obvious clue in OD. Key: L. mixtus mixed, mingled < miscere to mix.
Meliornis novaehollandiae campbelli – no obvious clue in OD. Key: Archibald James Campbell (1853-1929) Australian ornithologist, collector . subsp. Phylidonyris novaehollandiae(ex Meliornis novaehollandiae halmaturina Campbell, 1906)
Meliornis novaehollandiae intermedius – no obvious clue in OD. Key: L. intermedius intermediate, that is between.
Coleia carunculata clelandi – no obvious clue in OD. Key: Prof. Sir John Burton Cleland (1878-1971) Australian pathologist, mycologist, ornithologist. subsp. Anthochaera carunculata .
Neophilemon orientalis confusus – no obvious clue in OD. From Type Specimens of the AMNH Part 9 LeCroy 2011. Mathews (1912a: 422) had originally considered the northeast Queensland Philemon to be Philemon buceroides (Swainson), restricting Swainson’s type locality to Cairns when he (Mathews, 1912d: 102) named the Cape York population P. b. yorki. The generic name Neophilemon was introduced by Mathews (1912e: 117) with Philemon buceroides as the type species. Immediately thereafter, he (Mathews, 1912e: 117) introduced the generic name Microphilemon with Buphaga orientalis Latham (5 Tropidorhynchus citreogularis Gould) as the type species. When Hellmayr (1916: 101–102) found that Swainson’s type of P. buceroides was from Timor, not Australia, he accepted Mathews’ name yorki for the Australian form, accorded it full species status, and considered Mathews’ name gordoni a subspecies of P. yorki. The Australasian Ornithologists’ Union Check List Committee having pointed out to Mathews that Latham’s and Gould’s names were not synonyms, Mathews (1923b: 39) then used Neophilemon orientalis (Latham) as the species name for the northern Australian populations of P. buceroides, restricting the type locality of nominate Neophilemon orientalis to Cooktown. Thus, this left the Cairns population, formerly bearing Swainson’s name, to be accounted for; Mathews’ (1923b: 39) solution was to immediately name Neophilemon orientalis confusus from Cairns.I think the bird name history is confusing.
Zonaeginthus bellus rosinae – no obvious clue in OD. Key: Ethel Rosina White (1876-1926) wife of Australian ornithologist Capt. Samuel White. syn. Stagonopleura bella samueli.
Neopoephila personata hilli – no obvious clue in OD. Key: Gerald Freer Hill (1880-1954) Australian entomologist, explorer, collector (syn. Poephila personata) Type Species of AMNH “Mathews (1926: 253) quoted both Hill and Barnard as having observed these birds at Borroloola”
Corvus cecilae problëema – no obvious clue in OD. Key: probleema / problema
Gr. προβλημα problēma, προβληματος problēmatos puzzle, enigma < προβαλλω proballō to put forward.
Some of the names are obvious like Tom Carter collected carteri others less clear.
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Old Tuesday 27th March 2018, 17:38   #46
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Linnaeus's two Hummingbirds ... and "his" Hawk!

Even if the Etymology itself is beyond any doubt, here´s three invalid scientific names, not listed in today's HBW Alive Key ...

linnaei as in:
● "[Thaumantias] linnæi" BONAPARTE 1854 (here, No.58/245) [New name for "Trochilus thaumantias" LINNAEUS 1766 = today's subspecies Polytmus guainumbi thaumantias LINNAEUS 1766]
... not listed among the other linnaei birds in the Key, but mentioned in connection to the Generic name Thaumatias (alt. Thaumantias) ... at least the one by Bonaparte (not Gould's, below)

● "Thaumatias Linnæi" GOULD 1861 [alt. BONAPARTE, 1854 sensu GOULD, 1861] (here, with Plate on the preceding page) [syn. Amazilia fimbriata GMELIN 1788]

Both the above mentioned Hummingbirds were earlier discussed here on the Bird Name Etymology sub-forum (back in November 2014), in the thread Questions of three "Linnaean" Synonyms … (here).

That's more than three years ago, and I´m still not all (not 100%) convinced that I understood (and understand) the synonyms properly? Anyone who can deny or confirm them as identified belonging to either one of today's taxa (as above)? The fact that James seems to hesitate in adding the two Hummingbirds to the Key contributes strongly to my feeling of uncertainty ...

Either way: here´s also a third, earlier all un-noted (or simply missed):
● "F. [Falco] linnæi" RIDGWAY 1876 (ex Cassin, MS, here, in Foot-note) [= female specimen of Chilean Hawk (Nisus) Accipiter chilensis PHILIPPI & LANDBECK 1864]

Enjoy!

Björn

PS. And; of course, they are all commemorating The Great Linnaeus himself; Carl Linnæus (1707-1778), who was raised to nobility in 1757*, thereafter known as Carl von Linné (a k a, in Latin; pre-nobility; Carolus Linnaeus alt., in genitive case, Caroli Linnæi versus post-nobility; Carolus a Linné).

Born "13 may 1707" (Old style = 23 May 1707, in today's Calendar), Son of Nils (Ingemarsson) Linnæus and his wife Christina. Carl grew up in Stenbrohult, Småland, Sweden, and so on ... it´s a well-known story.

___________________________________________
*approved/ratified by the Swedish Parliament, in 1762.

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Old Wednesday 28th March 2018, 11:16   #47
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Thanks, Björn. Altho' only Gould's name is validly created (I showed it as Polyerata fimbriata (under which it was listed in HBW 5, p. 601; but the Illustrated Checklist I, pp. 296-301, has lumped all those old genera under Amazilia)), for the sake of completeness, I have added the other two names to the Key.
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Old Thursday 29th March 2018, 13:13   #48
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You´re welcome, James ... but, maybe I´m stupid, ... I simply cannot get my head around those Hummingbirds ... and believe me; I´ve tried.

If "only Gould's name is validly created" (like you replied), why isn´t it listed in the Key [as (in my view, this far) a synonym of (Polyerata) Amazilia fimbriata]?

Today's updated HBW Alive Key tells us:
Quote:
linnaei / linnaeii
Carl von Linné or Carolus Linnaeus (1707-1778) Swedish botanist, naturalist, physician, father of binomial nomenclature (syn. Accipiter bicolor chilensis, syn. Eclectus roratus, syn. Icterus nigrogularis, syn. Phalacrocorax aristotelis, syn. Polytmus guainumbi thaumantias, subsp. Turdus grayi (...
If anyone would look for an explanation of what bird Gould was writing about, and depicted, as "Linnæi" it would be very easy (following today's Key, above) to belive it´s a synonym of the Goldenthroat Polytmus subspecies.

I would certainly (if only a bit less doubtful/sceptical/suspicious ) have been led astray, and belived such was/is the case ...

And James, where did you "showed it as Polyerata fimbriata"? Was that in the HBW Alive Key? Or in any of your printed books? I´ve been checking the Key repeatedly for linnaei (now and then, since 2014, when we dealt with those names last time), most recently last Tuesday, this far without any sign of it, as a synonym of fimbriata.

And; even if fimbriata was moved from Polyerata into Amazilia what disqualifies the identity of Gould's "Linnæi" from the Key?

What am I missing?

Please enlighten me!

Björn
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Last edited by Calalp : Friday 30th March 2018 at 09:45.
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Old Friday 30th March 2018, 10:10   #49
Calalp
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Compare Gould's Plate (here) with for example the photos of the Glittering-throated Emerald (Polyerata) Amazilia fimbriata; here, here, here ... or elsewhere, versus photos of the subspecies Polytmus guainumbi thaumantias here.

In my mind there´s little doubt that Gould's plate does depict the former species.
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Old Friday 30th March 2018, 15:32   #50
l_raty
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In my view only Bonaparte's name was validly created.

Thaumatias linnaei Bonaparte 1854 [OD] is indeed a substitute for the available species group name thaumantias Linnaeus 1766 [OD], obviously introduced for the sole purpose of avoiding tautonymy when the species was placed in Bonaparte's genus Thaumatias [OD], here spelled 'Thaumantias' (*), as was frequently done back then. Bonaparte also cited fig. 1 of Pl. enl. 600 -- not published in 1766, hence of course not part of the original type series of Tr. thaumantias L.; added to its synonymy by Gmelin 1788, and cited again repeatedly, including by Gray 1840 when he designated [and misspelled] "Polytmus thaumatias (L.)" as the type of Polytmus Brisson (**). The citation of this plate does not affect the type series of the replacement name, which remains that of the replaced name (ICZN Art. 72.7).

The only thing that Gould did, was to explicitly apply Bonaparte's name:
Quote:
I agree with M. Bourcier and Prince Charles L. Bonaparte, that it will be advantageous to give the present bird another appellation, and I have therefore adopted that of Linnaei, proposed for it by the Prince, in honour of the great Swedish naturalist.
With this, Gould could only have created a new name if Bonaparte had not validly created it before him, which he had.

Gould presumably adopted Bonaparte's name for what he believed to be the taxonomic species which Bonaparte called "Tr. thaumantias L. 1766" in the OD, which is not quite clear, at least to me. It appears, from Bonaparte's Conspectus generum avium [here], that in 1850 the Prince regarded "Trochilus thaumatias L." as a senior synonym of Ornismya albiventris Lesson [OD] (itself now regarded as a junior synonym of Trochilus fimbriatus Gmelin). However, in the 1854 work where he introduced Thaumatias linnaei, Bonaparte used albiventris Lesson as valid for another species, thus he had presumably changed his mind on this issue. In 1861, Gould used albiventris as valid for an other species too; he treated Thaumatias linnaei Bonaparte as a synonym of O. viridissima Lesson 1829 [OD], which he regarded as preoccupied by Trochilus viridissimus Gmelin 1788, and which Bonaparte 1854 did not cite. Which taxonomic species Bonaparte applied his replacement name to (what Thaumatias linnaei "Bonaparte 1854 sensu Bonaparte 1854" may have been) does not affect the type series of this name either (ICZN Art. 72.7, again).
___
(*) An incorrect subsequent spelling here, in my reading. I know the opposite (i.e., Thaumatias being an incorrect OS) was again recently argued for, but it does not seem possible to prove an inadvertent error using exclusively internal information from the OD (which spelling was used in Linnaeus 1766 is external information, and cannot be used), thus in my view the OS cannot be deemed incorrect under ICZN Art.32.5, and any correction would be unjustified. Additionally, the modification of spelling is not demonstrably intentional here, thus I would not even regard it as an emendation. (The modified spelling is presumably available as an unjustified emendation from some later work, though.)
(**) Gray's misspelling being presumably the source of the spelling that Bonaparte used for his genus, as well as its type species. Bonaparte unquestionably used Gray as a source, as he referred to his work in the OD ("Polytmus, p. Br. Gr." = Polytmus as per Brisson and Gray).

Last edited by l_raty : Saturday 31st March 2018 at 09:57.
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