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Black Swan

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Old Saturday 25th November 2017, 10:55   #1
Nutcracker
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Black Swan

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Old Saturday 25th November 2017, 10:58   #2
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Currently says "Feral populations can be found world-wide from escaped collections" - this is obviously not true, e.g. BOU does not accept any established feral population in Britain (species in category E, not C).

What countries around the world do have formally recognised feral (category C or equivalent) populations? Does anyone have any info, please?
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Old Saturday 25th November 2017, 11:28   #3
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Originally Posted by Nutcracker View Post
Currently says "Feral populations can be found world-wide from escaped collections" - this is obviously not true, e.g. BOU does not accept any established feral population in Britain (species in category E, not C).

What countries around the world do have formally recognised feral (category C or equivalent) populations? Does anyone have any info, please?
How many pairs of Black Swan in Britain? Are they not breeding and maintaining a population in Essex (Abberton,etc)?

Though they may not have reached the BOU standard for a self-sustaining population, and thus category C, I think it is is perfectly correct to say they are a feral population.

I believe it would be incorrect, and misleading for Opus, to purely describe Black Swans in the UK as escapes - there are certainly multi-generation individuals of the breeding population. Category C elsewhere in Europe anyhow.
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Old Saturday 25th November 2017, 12:07   #4
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How many pairs of Black Swan in Britain? Are they not breeding and maintaining a population in Essex (Abberton,etc)?
25 pairs in 2010, 17 in 2011 (BB 107: 128).

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Though they may not have reached the BOU standard for a self-sustaining population, and thus category C, I think it is is perfectly correct to say they are a feral population. I believe it would be incorrect, and misleading for Opus, to purely describe Black Swans in the UK as escapes - there are certainly multi-generation individuals of the breeding population.
I'd be inclined to stick with BOU (and other relevant national authority) rules

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Category C elsewhere in Europe anyhow.
Which countries, though, please?
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Old Saturday 25th November 2017, 12:55   #5
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I'd be inclined to stick with BOU (and other relevant national authority) rules
As I understand, BOU adjudicates if there is a self-sustaining population for purposes of classifying to category C, I would not see this arguing against the presence of a feral population.

British Birds for example does acknowledge a population, citing it as the most widely distributed rare non-native breeding bird in Britain. If I understand Opus, it is primarily a source for the general readership, so when folk find Opus on google after seeing a pair of Black Swans with cygnets on a reservoir in Britain, I think it should reflect the actuality - ie. there is a feral population, (feral: "having reverted to the wild state, especially after escape from captivity or domestication.").
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Old Saturday 25th November 2017, 17:46   #6
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I am with Josh on this opus does not say "established feral", only feral.

Secondly, the phrase "world wide" does not indicate presence in every country, only that it is widespread.

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Old Saturday 25th November 2017, 18:45   #7
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OK, but it would still be useful to have a listing of countries where established feral populations exist. I can't think of anywhere else to find this info.
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Old Sunday 26th November 2017, 01:56   #8
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I am not sure which section of BF, but make a search in for example taxonomy and bird id sections. I have the feeling it is C in the Netherlands but I do not have the data at hand either.

Actually, something came to mind: http://www.aerc.eu/DOCS/AERC%20WPlist%20July%202015.pdf

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Old Sunday 26th November 2017, 13:53   #9
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Originally Posted by njlarsen View Post
I am not sure which section of BF, but make a search in for example taxonomy and bird id sections. I have the feeling it is C in the Netherlands but I do not have the data at hand either.

Actually, something came to mind: http://www.aerc.eu/DOCS/AERC%20WPlist%20July%202015.pdf

Niels
Thanks! I'll take a look. The AERC list I suspect only does a sample, I'd not be surprised if it is Cat. C in a few other European countries as well.
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Old Sunday 26th November 2017, 16:00   #10
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Did you know it was apparently Napoleon Bonaparte's wife Josephine who was the first to breed Black Swans in the Northern Hemisphere?
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