Join for FREE
It only takes a minute!
Zeiss - Always on the lookout for something special – Shop now

Welcome to BirdForum.
BirdForum is the net's largest birding community, dedicated to wild birds and birding, and is absolutely FREE! You are most welcome to register for an account, which allows you to take part in lively discussions in the forum, post your pictures in the gallery and more.

The Ladybird thread

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rating: Thread Rating: 17 votes, 4.94 average.
Old Friday 7th October 2005, 13:32   #51
paul mabbott
Urban space man
 
paul mabbott's Avatar

 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Sheffield, UK
Posts: 430
numeric names

Hello Harry,
Quite a lot of beetles have Latin numbers in their names but it's only with ladybirds that they are commonly printed as numerals. As you say, the 14-spot ladybird is Subcoccinella vigintiquattuorpunctata which is a bit of a mouthful so it's commonly printed as S. 24-punctata. Lazy ladybird people go even further and refer to it as S24p along with A10p, H16g &c!
Cheers, Paul
Quote:
Originally Posted by harry eales
Hello LB,

I think your correct in that numbers are unique to Ladybirds. However, as I understand it, the use of numbers is simply a way of making the writing of a scientific name easier and more perhaps understandable to most people and especially those of us who haven't had the benefit of being taught Latin.

Most amateur naturalists would recognise bipunctata as two spot and decipunctata as 10 spot, but how many would recognise the number 7 or 22 when written in Latin? A scientist or taxonomist may use the full Latin specific name in a scientific paper, but it likely that it will only be read by another of the same ilk, who will understand it.

I wonder how long it will be before we see Five and Six spot Burnet Moths written as 5 spot and 6 spot?

Harry
paul mabbott is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Friday 7th October 2005, 14:08   #52
paul mabbott
Urban space man
 
paul mabbott's Avatar

 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Sheffield, UK
Posts: 430
ladybird distribution

Not a book but if you go to www.searchnbn.net and find the Coccinellidae, you can find maps for the British species.
The Majerus and Majerus & Kearns books are now somewhat out of date and I would recommend Roger Hawkins 'Ladybirds of Surrey' (from Surrey Wildlife Trust) - has a lot of Surrey stuff, of course, but deals with all British species in detail and with great pictures.
And, as a last resort, you might want to try my site at http://www.ladybird-survey.pwp.bluey...k/londonla.htm ....
Cheers, Paul
Quote:
Originally Posted by Colin
I have been searching for some distribution information, preferably in the form of maps for UK ladybirds. I have tried Google etc and have found several interesting sites with information on hibernation types, id pointers especially the tricky ones with lots of variation etc. but I have not found any distribution maps. Can anyone help?

Secondly, can anyone recommend any books on ladybirds, preferably UK and Europe.

Thanks in advance.
paul mabbott is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Friday 7th October 2005, 14:11   #53
paul mabbott
Urban space man
 
paul mabbott's Avatar

 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Sheffield, UK
Posts: 430
ladybird distribution ps

I forgot to mention that Mike Majerus is writing a new book up-dating his New Naturalist 'Ladybirds' which will deal with ladybirds of the world!
Worth waiting for?
Paul
Quote:
Originally Posted by paul mabbott
Not a book but if you go to www.searchnbn.net and find the Coccinellidae, you can find maps for the British species.
The Majerus and Majerus & Kearns books are now somewhat out of date and I would recommend Roger Hawkins 'Ladybirds of Surrey' (from Surrey Wildlife Trust) - has a lot of Surrey stuff, of course, but deals with all British species in detail and with great pictures.
And, as a last resort, you might want to try my site at http://www.ladybird-survey.pwp.bluey...k/londonla.htm ....
Cheers, Paul
paul mabbott is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Wednesday 12th October 2005, 17:07   #54
paul mabbott
Urban space man
 
paul mabbott's Avatar

 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Sheffield, UK
Posts: 430
Harmonia axyridis - the 'harlequin' ladybird

In the future we may be able to blame the absence of native ladybirds on the presence of the invading H. axyridis. Not yet except, perhaps, in London where it is almost everywhere in considerable numbers. As last year, there has been late breeding and many adults are in flight so it could turn up anywhere - there are lots of reports from the Suffolk countryside, for instance - last year it was quite numerous around Ipswich; clearly it is spreading.
There are large numbers in flight in Belgium so we might expect (as last year) many sightings on the S-E coast from Sussex to Norfolk. The established colonies in the SE seem to be gradually expanding inland.
Please report any sightings to either your local survey or to the national one at www.harlequin-survey.org
Thanks, Paul

Quote:
Originally Posted by paul mabbott
Strange, to the best of my knowledge it hasn't reached Somerset yet - a couple in Devon but still mainly in SE England (and Derby). There's a regularly up-dated map at www.harlequin-survey.org
Pal
paul mabbott is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Wednesday 12th October 2005, 17:38   #55
SleepyLizard
Registered User
 
SleepyLizard's Avatar

 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Australia
Posts: 260
Ladybird ID?

Does anyone recognise this little fellow.

5mm in length and found on 16th Spetember in Easter Ross, Scotland
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	444.jpg
Views:	210
Size:	65.5 KB
ID:	31864  
__________________
Alan
SleepyLizard is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Wednesday 12th October 2005, 18:00   #56
paul mabbott
Urban space man
 
paul mabbott's Avatar

 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Sheffield, UK
Posts: 430
10-spot

This is a nice picture of the ten-spot ladybird Adalia decempunctata. I suppose it might just about have ten spots? That would be unusual .... Told from most other ladybirds of its size by the pale legs and the spotty forebody. Quite a long way north then ... Winds blowing?
Paul
Quote:
Originally Posted by SleepyLizard
Does anyone recognise this little fellow.

5mm in length and found on 16th Spetember in Easter Ross, Scotland
paul mabbott is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Wednesday 12th October 2005, 19:12   #57
SleepyLizard
Registered User
 
SleepyLizard's Avatar

 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Australia
Posts: 260
Quote:
Originally Posted by paul mabbott
Quite a long way north then ... Winds blowing?
Thanks for that Paul - Now I no what to look for, there are quite a few similar looking ones out there and the distribution map ( Click here ) shows them not too far south of me.
__________________
Alan
SleepyLizard is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Wednesday 12th October 2005, 19:15   #58
Stranger
Registered User

 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: somerset
Posts: 1,209
Quote:
Originally Posted by paul mabbott
Strange, to the best of my knowledge it hasn't reached Somerset yet - a couple in Devon but still mainly in SE England (and Derby). There's a regularly up-dated map at www.harlequin-survey.org
Pal
Must admit I have`nt actually seen any Harlequins around here.
Just goes to show I should`nt believe everything in the papers.
Still a shortage of Ladybirds in my garden,although I had an infestation of Blackfly on the runner beans which I thought might attract them.
Total count for this year has only been four.
Stranger is offline  
Reply With Quote

BF Supporter 2007 Support BirdForum With A Donation

Old Thursday 13th October 2005, 00:29   #59
paul mabbott
Urban space man
 
paul mabbott's Avatar

 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Sheffield, UK
Posts: 430
Distribution

Very interesting. At this time of year the Adalia species (2- and 10-spot) do fly around looking for somewhere to overwinter so they're quite often seen (often indoors). The 10-spot is mainly a tree-dweller so tends to be seen less often than the other common red ladybirds - but in this season it shares their need to find shelter.
I hope you'll submit your record to the national survey. The maps at NBN are perhaps a little out of date *and/or* distribution could be changing along with the climate. Also there are large parts of the UK that were/are always under-recorded for all insects - Scotland north of Edinburgh is one of these!
Cheers, Paul

Quote:
Originally Posted by SleepyLizard
Thanks for that Paul - Now I no what to look for, there are quite a few similar looking ones out there and the distribution map ( Click here ) shows them not too far south of me.
paul mabbott is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Friday 21st October 2005, 13:18   #60
paul mabbott
Urban space man
 
paul mabbott's Avatar

 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Sheffield, UK
Posts: 430
ladybirds in autumn

The 'harlequin' ladybird is still very active all over SE England although especially in London and the Kent coast. They are running out of food and so are taking flight in large numbers; also, soon, they will start looking for sheltered places to overwinter.
This is, oddly, a good time to see most ladybirds, not just the invader. As the leaves fall off trees and aphids disappear, the ladybirds shelter on tree trunks - including the species that spend most of the year in the tree-tops.
Take a look at any tree trunk (but especially limes and sycamores) and you'll find at least one or two ladybirds. In some cases (such as the orange ladybird, Halyzia sedecimguttata) you might see large aggregates.
Cheers, Paul

Quote:
Originally Posted by Stranger
Must admit I have`nt actually seen any Harlequins around here.
Just goes to show I should`nt believe everything in the papers.
Still a shortage of Ladybirds in my garden,although I had an infestation of Blackfly on the runner beans which I thought might attract them.
Total count for this year has only been four.
paul mabbott is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Monday 31st October 2005, 16:18   #61
roosmum
Registered User

 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Dover Kent
Posts: 609
Ladybirds

I have some friends with a Guest House, it's a Victorian building with central heating. Every Winter they have ladybirds sneaking in to sleep in the ceiling corners of one or two rooms but this year the numbers are amazing!
They have seen "flocks" of ladybirds flying towards the house and are finding clusters of 20 or more in several rooms. Many many more are sheltering in and around the exterior brickwork.
The question is... should they evict the ones in the rooms or leave them to overwinter where they are? I'm dubious about the heating situation as they close for a couple of weeks over Christmas and New Year and I think the ladybirds might think it's Spring when the heating in the rooms comes back on in January.
Any ideas would be welcome
__________________
Rose

A poor life this if, full of care,
We have no time to stand and stare.


W H Davies
roosmum is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Monday 31st October 2005, 17:49   #62
paul mabbott
Urban space man
 
paul mabbott's Avatar

 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Sheffield, UK
Posts: 430
ladybirds in winter

It's a problem and you've identified some of the difficulties.
At this time of year many ladybirds will be looking for shelter to overwinter. They do *not* need to be indoors but seek shelter from the wind, rain and extreme cold. Houses or not, they will fly until they find a vertical surface and then climb until they find an overwintering niche. In the wild this may be a tree limb, a cleft in a tree; or they may creep under tree roots. In urban areas it may be under drain pipes, in garden sheds or ventilation bricks. If they find an open window or some other entrance then they will go inside away from the rain and cold!

There are several problems for those going indoors. As you note, people switch their heating on late in the year and the ladybirds think it's spring. (This happens in 'ordinary' homes where people warm the spare room for guests or switch the central heating on just before the holidays). Many of them die because they can't find water or food (unless you have a lot of house plants with aphids). And they can't get out - windows are shut when the heating is turned up.

So, if they're in a house, my advice is to collect them up and throw them outside - if it's cold, put them in a dense hedgerow. However, if they're in a a garage or outhouse that is not heated and is regularly open to the outside - leave them.

Finally (see the other ladybird thread), it would be interesting to know what type of ladybird they are. 2-spot ladybirds are common entrants to houses in urban areas but many other species may do it. However, the most notorious invader at present is the multivariate Asian or harlequin ladybird, Harmonia axyridis. In which case, one might not worry too much about saving them?

Cheers, Paul M
Quote:
Originally Posted by roosmum
I have some friends with a Guest House, it's a Victorian building with central heating. Every Winter they have ladybirds sneaking in to sleep in the ceiling corners of one or two rooms but this year the numbers are amazing!
They have seen "flocks" of ladybirds flying towards the house and are finding clusters of 20 or more in several rooms. Many many more are sheltering in and around the exterior brickwork.
The question is... should they evict the ones in the rooms or leave them to overwinter where they are? I'm dubious about the heating situation as they close for a couple of weeks over Christmas and New Year and I think the ladybirds might think it's Spring when the heating in the rooms comes back on in January.
Any ideas would be welcome
paul mabbott is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Monday 31st October 2005, 19:18   #63
paul mabbott
Urban space man
 
paul mabbott's Avatar

 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Sheffield, UK
Posts: 430
ladybirds in autumn

I seem to be the only person on this forum seeing ladybirds but they are around. It is, as I notedquite a good time of year to see many species but at present there are lots of the invasive 'harlequin'.
The latest www.harlequin-survey.org map shows new finds in Staffordshire and Gloucestershire (not far from Somerset!); however these are isolated observations compared to the thousands flying around London and the south-east. They have also reappeared in Derby where there are groups on the cathedral wall - seeking sanctuary? None have been recorded outside of Derby city - they must have flown to other towns and villages. Has anyone seen any?
Paul M


Quote:
Originally Posted by paul mabbott
The 'harlequin' ladybird is still very active all over SE England although especially in London and the Kent coast. They are running out of food and so are taking flight in large numbers; also, soon, they will start looking for sheltered places to overwinter.
This is, oddly, a good time to see most ladybirds, not just the invader. As the leaves fall off trees and aphids disappear, the ladybirds shelter on tree trunks - including the species that spend most of the year in the tree-tops.
Take a look at any tree trunk (but especially limes and sycamores) and you'll find at least one or two ladybirds. In some cases (such as the orange ladybird, Halyzia sedecimguttata) you might see large aggregates.
Cheers, Paul
paul mabbott is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Tuesday 1st November 2005, 07:27   #64
DavidJJones
Garden Bird & Bug Watcher
 
DavidJJones's Avatar

 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Aldershot, Hampshire, UK
Posts: 179
[quote=paul mabbott]I seem to be the only person on this forum seeing ladybirds but they are around.

Here in Aldershot, Hampshire I'm still seeing Orange Ladybirds very active on my Himalayan Birch - there are still plenty of leaves which have mildew for them to feed on. Their numbers haven't been as high this year. They appeared earlier than in previous years and their larvae were roaming the leaves when they were still fresh, with very little in mildew for them to feed on.

There has been no sign of the Harlequin Ladybird here this year. I guess that next Spring may well change that situation.
__________________
David Jones

Garden Wildlife diaries and nestbox webcams/diaries at
http://www.mybitoftheplanet.com
DavidJJones is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Tuesday 1st November 2005, 17:41   #65
roosmum
Registered User

 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Dover Kent
Posts: 609
Hi Paul. They seem to be 2 and 7 spot ladybirds, certainly all black and red with no yellow coloured ones in evidence and nothing which might be a harlequin as far as I can see.
__________________
Rose

A poor life this if, full of care,
We have no time to stand and stare.


W H Davies
roosmum is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Tuesday 1st November 2005, 18:58   #66
paul mabbott
Urban space man
 
paul mabbott's Avatar

 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Sheffield, UK
Posts: 430
orange ladybirds

Hello David,
Yes, this has been a good year for oranges. If it hadn't been for the invasion by haxy, we might have been talking about 'The Year of the Orange Ladybird'! I think this has been a good year for them because it has been relatively moist throughout the year (no droughts) thus encouraging mildew on which the ladybird feeds.
Yes, the 'harlequin' has been seen in southern Hants but not in large numbers - you may not get it for a couple of years (hopefully).
Cheers, Paul

Here in Aldershot, Hampshire I'm still seeing Orange Ladybirds very active on my Himalayan Birch - there are still plenty of leaves which have mildew for them to feed on. Their numbers haven't been as high this year. They appeared earlier than in previous years and their larvae were roaming the leaves when they were still fresh, with very little in mildew for them to feed on.
There has been no sign of the Harlequin Ladybird here this year. I guess that next Spring may well change that situation.[/quote]

Last edited by paul mabbott : Tuesday 1st November 2005 at 18:59. Reason: space
paul mabbott is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Thursday 3rd November 2005, 15:51   #67
paul mabbott
Urban space man
 
paul mabbott's Avatar

 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Sheffield, UK
Posts: 430
Hello Rose. You'd know if they were harlequins - they would all be different! You could probably find them around your way - they seem to have been flying over and there are large numbers between Ramsgate and Canterbury. Beware!
Paul
Quote:
Originally Posted by roosmum
Hi Paul. They seem to be 2 and 7 spot ladybirds, certainly all black and red with no yellow coloured ones in evidence and nothing which might be a harlequin as far as I can see.
paul mabbott is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Wednesday 9th November 2005, 21:37   #68
Stuart Read
Registered User

 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Sudbury, Suffolk
Posts: 423
Quote:
Originally Posted by paul mabbott
Hello Rose. You'd know if they were harlequins - they would all be different! You could probably find them around your way - they seem to have been flying over and there are large numbers between Ramsgate and Canterbury. Beware!
Paul
Here's a couple from West Suffolk.

Stuart.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	harlequin ladybird1.jpg
Views:	230
Size:	141.4 KB
ID:	33795  Click image for larger version

Name:	harlequin ladybird4.jpg
Views:	220
Size:	168.7 KB
ID:	33796  
Stuart Read is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Thursday 10th November 2005, 12:02   #69
paul mabbott
Urban space man
 
paul mabbott's Avatar

 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Sheffield, UK
Posts: 430
Harlequins

Thanks Stuart,
These are the succinea (19-spot) and the spectabilis (4-spot melanic) forms. The other common British form is the conspicua (2-spot melanic) of which I've attached a pic.
Just to confuse things, the succinea may have more spots or fewer (down to 0) and the melanic patches may be of all sorts of shapes. There are several other pattern variants which haven't been seen in UK yet - worth keeping an eye out for.
Cheers, Paul
PS: the critical features of this species are that they have brown legs, have large patches of white down the side of the forebody and a small white triangle on the head - all nicely seen in Stuart's pics.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Stuart Read
Here's a couple from West Suffolk.

Stuart.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	conspicua.jpg
Views:	237
Size:	62.9 KB
ID:	33816  
paul mabbott is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Friday 25th November 2005, 09:36   #70
paul mabbott
Urban space man
 
paul mabbott's Avatar

 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Sheffield, UK
Posts: 430
'harlequin' ladybird

The 'harlequin' ladybird is stil active (in London and Derby at least) even during the deep frosts of the last week. Its home range includes Siberia so that's not too surprising. Will be interesting to see how long it stays active?

Quote:
Originally Posted by paul mabbott
Hello David,
Yes, the 'harlequin' has been seen in southern Hants but not in large numbers - you may not get it for a couple of years (hopefully).
Cheers, Paul

There has been no sign of the Harlequin Ladybird here this year. I guess that next Spring may well change that situation.
[/quote]
paul mabbott is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Friday 25th November 2005, 18:06   #71
DavidJJones
Garden Bird & Bug Watcher
 
DavidJJones's Avatar

 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Aldershot, Hampshire, UK
Posts: 179
Orange Ladybirds still active -just about.

Quote:
Originally Posted by paul mabbott
The 'harlequin' ladybird is stil active (in London and Derby at least) even during the deep frosts of the last week. Its home range includes Siberia so that's not too surprising. Will be interesting to see how long it stays active?
The Orange Ladybirds that I can still see on the Birch leaves don't seem to have moved today (dry but cold, 2C with north wind blowing) but a few of them have been moving about over the last couple of days, so it seems that, with the tree still holding on to the majority of its leaves, these ladybirds haven't quite given up for winter quite yet.
__________________
David Jones

Garden Wildlife diaries and nestbox webcams/diaries at
http://www.mybitoftheplanet.com
DavidJJones is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Friday 25th November 2005, 22:29   #72
paul mabbott
Urban space man
 
paul mabbott's Avatar

 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Sheffield, UK
Posts: 430
The orange ladybird is quite unusual in that it will stay active late in the year. There are still pupae about (in London, probably elsewhere). Roger Hawkins collected a pupa which emerged during the winter. This has not been observed in nature but it's possible that they are the only British species capable of overwintering as pupae. Orange ladybirds are the northernmost species in Britain (from older records) so they're obviously quite hardy - it remains to be seen whether their numbers will be afected by the invasion of Harmonia axyridis. Mike Majerus has a theory that they can determine the hardness of the forthcominf winter: if it will be mild they will 'hibernate' on trees, if it will be hard, they will bury themselves in leaf litter. I don't see this from London observations *but* only records will tell - see if you can find orange ladybirds and let one of the recording systems know!
Please do this for all ladybirds - if in doubt mail me and I'll pass records on to appropriate recorders. Thanks, Paul

Quote:
Originally Posted by DavidJJones
The Orange Ladybirds that I can still see on the Birch leaves don't seem to have moved today (dry but cold, 2C with north wind blowing) but a few of them have been moving about over the last couple of days, so it seems that, with the tree still holding on to the majority of its leaves, these ladybirds haven't quite given up for winter quite yet.
paul mabbott is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Tuesday 20th December 2005, 07:44   #73
paul mabbott
Urban space man
 
paul mabbott's Avatar

 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Sheffield, UK
Posts: 430
Ladybirds in the supermarket

Another exotic ladybird, the African Cheinomeles lunata, has been found on grapes in Perth (Scotland). This very distinctive, large ladybird was last found in good numbers during the winter of 2001-2, also on grapes. Lots of other interesting ladybirds and other insects may be found on southern hemisphere importance - makes shopping more interesting!

Quote:
Originally Posted by paul mabbott
The orange ladybird is quite unusual in that it will stay active late in the year. There are still pupae about (in London, probably elsewhere). Roger Hawkins collected a pupa which emerged during the winter. This has not been observed in nature but it's possible that they are the only British species capable of overwintering as pupae. Orange ladybirds are the northernmost species in Britain (from older records) so they're obviously quite hardy - it remains to be seen whether their numbers will be afected by the invasion of Harmonia axyridis. Mike Majerus has a theory that they can determine the hardness of the forthcominf winter: if it will be mild they will 'hibernate' on trees, if it will be hard, they will bury themselves in leaf litter. I don't see this from London observations *but* only records will tell - see if you can find orange ladybirds and let one of the recording systems know!
Please do this for all ladybirds - if in doubt mail me and I'll pass records on to appropriate recorders. Thanks, Paul
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	Cheilomenes.jpg
Views:	249
Size:	18.3 KB
ID:	36205  
paul mabbott is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Wednesday 1st February 2006, 10:44   #74
paul mabbott
Urban space man
 
paul mabbott's Avatar

 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Sheffield, UK
Posts: 430
And it's still going but so are a lot of other ladybirds, despite the seriously low temperatures.
We're trying to intensify the study of the spread of this beast and its effects, if any, on native species. I'm co-ordinating a set of surveys in the north of England (see http://www.ladybird-survey.pwp.bluey...o.uk/NoELS.htm ) and have set up an e-group specifically for ladybird watchers in the north (although anyone interested from elsewhere would be welcome) - drop me an e-mail for an invitation.
Best wishes, Paul
Quote:
Originally Posted by paul mabbott
The 'harlequin' ladybird is stil active (in London and Derby at least) even during the deep frosts of the last week. Its home range includes Siberia so that's not too surprising. Will be interesting to see how long it stays active?
[/quote]
paul mabbott is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Saturday 4th February 2006, 15:11   #75
willowa
Registered User

 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Northants
Posts: 439
None native Ladybirds

IF this has been aired before please let me know the tread.

Has anyone got any information on the ladybirds none native to the UK. That are putting our native ladytbirds in danger (If there is not enough food to go round). Have you got any photos of these to compare with our own species.
And what do we do( if anything) about them.
willowa is offline  
Reply With Quote
Advertisement
Reply


Thread Tools
Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
The story of the Orange Ladybird in pictures Tanny Insects, Dragonflies, Arachnids, Beetles & More 20 Wednesday 6th December 2006 14:17
Update on Tad (My Ladybird) Silvershark Birds & Birding 23 Sunday 15th January 2006 10:34
Survey to track 'alien' ladybird Chris Monk Insects, Dragonflies, Arachnids, Beetles & More 1 Wednesday 16th March 2005 21:25

{googleads}

Fatbirder's Top 1000 Birding Websites

Help support BirdForum

Page generated in 0.32727599 seconds with 38 queries
All times are GMT. The time now is 14:02.