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The Eponym Dictionary of Birds

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Old Sunday 14th June 2015, 17:51   #26
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Maybe this is a Julian vs Gregorian situation? I think that Germany was 11 days ahead of Russia in 1781/2 Not quite enough December 26. My family was odd they celebrated the anniversery of our baptism. In the Mearns review he mentions that Tragopan hastingii was not dealt with. HBWAlive says it is named for Warren Hastings Governor of Bengal. This makes emminant sense. He was close friends with Justice and lady Impey. Thomas Hardwicke of Illustrations of Indian Zoology testified at his impeachment and was on a committee that had a statute made of him after Hastings died. The name comes from Vigor from birds collected by Franklin in India. I can not make a connection to Hastings with them although Franklin was a member of the light cavalry in Bengal but much later. Also it is not hastingsii but hastingii. Is the last s often ignored? There is nothing in the OD that mentions Warren Hastings. Just wondering . 6. "Great Egret has been known as Queen Victoria’s Egret" . Well in 1842 MacGillivray named a Great Egret specimen Erodius victoriae. He thought it was a new species but was wrong. "I propose naming it after our most gracious Queen". https://books.google.com/books?id=Dd...page&q&f=false . Page 134.
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Old Monday 15th June 2015, 07:00   #27
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Tragopan hastingii JARDINE 1834

Mark, you´re perfectly right, there´s no second s in hastingii, OD here, with plates.

And below, the plate of the male in full colour [i.e. today's Tragopan melanocephalus GRAY 1829].
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Old Tuesday 16th June 2015, 09:38   #28
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Just a guess. In the same book is a Charles Hastings mentioned. Maybe dedication for him?
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Old Friday 2nd October 2015, 06:59   #29
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Ornis Fennica

Reviewed by William Velmala: Ornis Fennica 92(3): 153–154.
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Old Friday 2nd October 2015, 08:20   #30
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As as well the Eponym of Birds was reviewed in fact the Swedish physician and botanist
Johan Peter Falck is written wrong with a c. Correct seems to be Johan Peter Falk as mentioned by Hartert here or e.g. in first Vol of Falk here.
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Old Friday 2nd October 2015, 08:42   #31
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William Velmala apparently doesn´t know his subject, and he doesn´t seem to know of the HBW Alive Key!

Except Alexander von Nordmann we also have, for example; Mr. Odo Reuter (not listed by Beolens et al), Mr. Albert Collin ("English" by Beolens et al) and the supposedly Finnish Mr. G. G. Gadd ("Finnish" according to Beolens et al , and James [not by me], but Mr. Velmala obviously missed him totally!).

Looks like he just read the book and swallowed it undigested. It´s easy to write a review not questioning the content!

Björn

PS. Martin, Falck is correct! (here). This time Hartert´s wrong.
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Old Friday 2nd October 2015, 10:08   #32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Calalp View Post
PS. Martin, Falck is correct! (here). This time Hartert´s wrong.
He certainly signed "Joh. P. Falck" in his letters to Linnaeus (eg, [here]). Yet, Hartert 1917 was not really "wrong" either, as his name is certainly spelled "Johann Peter Falk" in the 1786 work that he was discussing.
Of course, there is absolutely nothing "unlikely, even peculiar," in the fact "that the Central Asian subspecies falki of Chukar was named after the Swedish physician and botanist Johan Peter Falck – almost 150 years after his death." Hartert found that the name kakelik, then in use for this taxon in the Russian literature and authored by "Falk" 1786 was not acceptable, so he named the taxon after the presumed original describer. This is fairly standard practice.
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Old Friday 2nd October 2015, 10:17   #33
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I agree to Laurents comment. The cover page of the book indicates Falk. But maybe a german version of the last name.

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Old Friday 2nd October 2015, 12:18   #34
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Remember that Beyträge zur Topographischen Kenntniss des Russischen Reichs was published post mortem, not strictly by Falck himelf, but compiled and published (in German) by the Pommeranian Naturalist Johann Gottlieb Georgi (1729–1802,) based on Mr. Falck's notes and collections.

Noteworthy here, in this matter, is the last sentence, in brackets (below) from the detailed entry of Johan Peter Falck, in the very reliable Dictionary of Swedish National Biography (link in Post #31), following Falck's suicide (he tried to cut his throat with a knife, failed, picked up a gun hidden in his sick bed and shot himself in the head!):
Quote:
F:s begravning ombesörjdes av Georgi, som skickade hans naturaliesamlingar, manuskript och böcker m. m. till vetenskapsakademien i S: t Petersburg. För bearbetning och publicering överlämnade denna anteckningarna och samlingarna till den i Finland födde Erik Laxman, som hade gjort vidsträckta forskningsresor i Sibirien och nu var professor i ekonomi och kemi vid akademien. Han åtog sig uppgiften men hade 1780, då han blev bergsråd i östra Sibirien, ej börjat arbetet. Akademien lämnade då uppdraget åt Georgi, som på ett berömvärt sätt skilde sig från detsamma genom utgivandet av »Beyträge zur Topographischen Kenntniss des Russischen Reichs» (tre band i kvartoformat, 1785—86) av Johann Peter Falk (endast undantagsvis användes i boken den riktiga stavningen Falck).
Meaning something like: "F:s [Falck's] funeral was handled by Georgi, who sent his Natural collections, manuscripts and books, etc, to the Academy of Sciences in St. Petersburg. To process and publish they handed over the notes and collections to the Finnish-born Erik Laxman, who had done extensive research travels in Siberia and now was Economy and Chemistry Professor at the Academy. He undertook the task but had in 1780, when he became a Mining Councelor in Eastern Siberia, not yet begun the work. The Academy then left the mission to Georgi, who in a praiseworthy manner released himself from the same by publishing the »Beyträge zur Topographischen Kenntniss des Russischen Reichs» (three volumes i quarto format, 1785—86) by Johann Peter Falk (only rarely was the real spelling Falck used in the book)."

And it´s nothing odd. In those days there were no true consensus, no established rules, on grammar or how to spell things. It varied. A lot. At least here in Scandinavia. Even our dear Linnaeus could spell the same (trivial) word differently, in the same text, even on the same page!

Cheers!

Björn

PS. His father was Peter Falck, not Peter Falk (and most certainly not Lt. Columbo)
---

Last edited by Calalp : Saturday 3rd October 2015 at 08:35. Reason: blank's
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Old Wednesday 28th October 2015, 11:07   #35
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barbaritoi

Here is another example where the authors of Eponym Dictionary of Birds failed and did not look at OD otherwise they wouldn't give dedication barbaritoi to Xaviero Barbarita. HBW Alive shows the correct person.
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Old Tuesday 25th October 2016, 08:19   #36
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As I came across Hartlaub entry in The Eponym Dictionary of Birds and have some serious doubts on:

Quote:
He also founded the Journal für Ornithologie with Cabanis.
Cabanis is the only editor of the first and many other volumes of JfO here. As well in Cabanis obituary it is clearly written here:

Quote:
... entschloß sich Cabanis im Jahr 1853 zur Herausgabe des Journals für Ornithologie.
Hartlaub is mentioned a little bit earlier...

Quote:
Cabanis und Hartlaub, und ihnen sich anschließend Prinz Max zu Wied, jene drei Gelehrten, die damals in Deutschland fast ausschließlich exotische Ornithologie betrieben.
...but this sentence does not mean that he is a founder of the journal. Of course he may have had an interest in an international orientated journal (other than the parallel existing Naumania focused on Germany/Europe only) but this does not mean that he was the founder of the journal.

I think another example the book is wrong.
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Old Wednesday 21st December 2016, 01:01   #37
Calalp
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Mr. Higham's Pheasant Coucal ... and the "Dictionary"

Let´s have a look at yet another obscure Eponym supposedly claimed as solved (at least partly) by Beolens et al ... this time regarding:

highami as in:
• the subspecies Centropus phasianinus highami MATHEWS 1922 (here) as "Polophilus phasianinus highami" ... no dedication, nor explanation.

According to the Eponym Dictionary of Birds (2014), as well as today's HBW Alive Key (!), this Eponym commemorate the British Bird Photographer and aviculturist "Walter Ernest Higham (fl.1936)" ... [i.e. Walter E. Higham, W.E., F.I.B.P., F.R.P.S, M.B.O.U., F.Z.S., he´s the Author of several Bird Photo books, no years found], but I´m not at all convinced it does!

The "Type" was "brought back from Australia by Mr. Tom Carter" (according to Mathews) "Collected on Glenflorrie, Ashburton River, Mid-West Australia", but Johnstone, Burbidge, & Darnell 2013 (here, p.400) gives us the additional info:
Quote:
The type specimen of this subspecies was collected by J.B. Higham on Glenflorrie Station on 4 Sept. 1921.
Once again I think we´be been led astray by the Eponym Dictionary of Birds!
Now I´m truly getting fed up with this far, far too often erroneous book. Sigh!

However, also see the News and Notes pages in Stray Feathers 54, 1954, here:
Quote:
The Governor in Executive Council has appointed Mr. J. B. Higham, of Narrogin, as a Member of the Committee for the unexpired term of the late Major H. M. Whittell. Mr. Higham has been a member of the R.A.O.U.[*] for many years. He accompanied the late Tom Carter on his last collecting trip through the south-west.
To me it sure looks like J. B. Higham is the guy!

Who he was? I haven´t got a clue!

Any of our Australian friends that can fill in the gaps?

And don´t hesitate to prove me wrong!

Björn
________________________________________
*R.A.O.U. = Royal Australian Ornithologists Union

Last edited by Calalp : Wednesday 21st December 2016 at 07:42. Reason: *
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Old Wednesday 21st December 2016, 07:49   #38
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Calalp View Post
However, also see the News and Notes pages in Stray Feathers 54, 1954, here: To me it sure looks like J. B. Higham is the guy!
To be precise since 1917 member of Australasian Ornithologists' Union. See here:

Quote:
1917 Higham, J. B., 'Minigin,' Narrogin
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Old Wednesday 21st December 2016, 09:12   #39
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And later (The Emu XXII, 1923) he´d moved, some 200 km, to Freemantle (WA):
Quote:
HIGHAM, J. B., "Manutarra," Alexandra Rd., East Fremantle.
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Old Wednesday 21st December 2016, 09:43   #40
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I believe I was led astray by Whittell, 1954, The Literature of Australian Birds, p. 338. Key entry corrected. Serenity reigns. Merry Christmas and an eventful 2017 to all those who have contributed to this forum, and who continue to make the Key authoritative and up-to-date.
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Old Wednesday 21st December 2016, 11:27   #41
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Calalp View Post
And later (The Emu XXII, 1923) he´d moved, some 200 km, to Freemantle (WA):
I think it is the other way round he moved from Freemantle to Narrogin as the EMU Volume (I linked) where it is written that he was member since 1917 is from 1944. Any relationship to this family here? Just a guess. Or relative to John Joseph Higham here e.g. one of his five sons? But looks like no of the five sons fit J.B. here.

According to EMU 1977 p. 42 and 44

Quote:
On the first night his party slept at Una but because there were seventeen visitors there (among them the grazier-ornithologist Jack Higham, of Glen Florrie, who was to become a firm friend and companion later) he had to sleep in the store.
and

Quote:
In connexion with the former he was made deputy to his old grazier-ornithologist friend J. B. Higham, as a member of the old Fauna Protection Advisory Committee (1955) and in 1968 he took the place of Higham when he retired, as a full member of its successor, the Western Australian Wildlife Authority.

Last edited by Taphrospilus : Thursday 22nd December 2016 at 06:21.
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Old Wednesday 21st December 2016, 14:35   #42
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Either way, regardless of his various addresses , here´s some additional info (clearly linking him to Mr. Carter), getting the highami entry even better, a little bit more complete!

In 1923 Thomas "Tom" Carter himself wrote, on p 221, in The Ibis, in a Paper titled Supplementary Notes on some Birds from Western Australia and from Dirk Hartog Island (pp.218-228):
Quote:
Polophilus phasianinus highami.

Mathews, Bull. B.O. C. xliii. 1922, p. 13.
This fine and interesting Coucal was not obtained by myself, but kindly given to me bv Mr. Jack B. Higham, who shot it on Glenflorrie Station, Ashburton River, Western Australia, 4 September, 1921.
Enjoy!
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Old Wednesday 21st December 2016, 15:11   #43
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The West Australian (Perth, WA) of 28 July 1941 [here] reported on the funerals of Mrs Maud Mary Higham, widow of the late Harry James William Higham, "formerly of Nanutarra Station". Among the chief mourners was a son named John B. Higham. (Jack is a diminutive of John in English.)
The members of Harry James William Higham's family are buried in the Fremantle Cemetery, pictures [here], where a tombstone [here] is marked "In Loving Memory of John Bateman Higham, 1898-1982".

PS - In the Government Gazette, W.A. of 30 April 1954 [here], I see a reference to a "Higham, John Bateman; Narrogin." -- this seems to fit his known displacements, thus.
PPS - Still in the same Government Gazette, W.A., but of 18 July 1958 [here], John Bateman Higham's appointment as a member of the Fauna Protection Advisory Committee is approved by the Governor. Compare to the second Emu quote in [Martin's post #41] above.

Last edited by l_raty : Wednesday 21st December 2016 at 20:02. Reason: link to West Australian; PS; PPS
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Old Wednesday 21st December 2016, 21:58   #44
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= John "Jack" Bateman Higham (1898–1982)

Quite a team effort!



Mr. Higham ... over and out!

PS. He apparently liked to ride his Motor bike!
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Old Tuesday 31st January 2017, 08:16   #45
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polatzeki

I assume HBW key entry....

Quote:
polatzeki
Capt. Johann Polatzek (1839-1927) Austrian ornithologist, collector in the Canary Is. 1902-1905, and Balearic Is. 1910 (subsp. Alaudala rufescens, Fringilla, syn. Galerida theklae).
... derived from here as entry was not present in Helm Dictionary of Scientific Bird Names.

I am wondering if birth 1839 is correct as e.g. here the birth year is 1838. Unfortunately here we only know he was in his 89th year (so both is possible) in 1927. Here they wrote around 1838. I am wondering about a reliable source dating his birth 1839 or 1838. Maybe Biogr. Notiz. Orn. Mber. 35, 1927, S. 95. gives us a hint.

Last edited by Taphrospilus : Tuesday 31st January 2017 at 08:19.
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Old Tuesday 31st January 2017, 19:10   #46
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Polatzek, hmm ... looks more Hungarian to me (or of Hungarian Heritage). He could maybe be a; (Johan, János) Polatsek, Polátseck, Polaseck, Polazek, etc. If he was? I sure don´t know. Here I´m simply thinking out loud. If of any help?

And regarding "Austrian", remember at the time those birds was descibed (1904-1912) Austria and Hungary was one joint country, between 1867 and 1918 (i.e. a constitutional union); Austria-Hungary a k a Austro-Hungarian Empire (Österreich-Ungarn). It´s quite possible that even if born in the Hungarian parts of that Empire he was believed to have been Austrian.

• the subspecies*Alaudala rufescens polatzeki HARTERT 1904 (here) as "Calandrella minor polatzeki" a k a "Polatzek's Short-toed Lark"
• the debated species (or subspecies) Fringilla (teydea) polatzeki HARTERT 1905 (here) as "Fringilla teydea polatzeki" a k a "Polatzek's Blue Chaffinch"
• the invalid "Galerida theklae polatzeki" HARTERT 1912 (here, also commented here) a k a "Polatzek's Crested Lark" and "Polatzeki's" (!?) [... but in spite of Harterts own view, today a synonym of nominate subspecies].

However; he was a Tring correspondent between 1901 and 1911, at that time living in Vienna (Wien), here.

That´s all I can find on this guy. Good luck finding his birth!

Björn

PS. Also (if you understand Spanish) the Paper; AVES ESPAÑOLAS CON NOMBRES DE PERSONA (II): una nueva especie ibérica dedicada a una mujer, Thekla Brehm (Galerida theklae Brehm, 1857 [1858]) (II), by Abilio Reig-Ferrer 2012, might be worth a look, here. He (and the latter, invalid lark) is mentioned on pp. 3-6, also in that paper claimed to be born in 1838.

If he truly was, is beyond me ...
-

Last edited by Calalp : Tuesday 31st January 2017 at 19:42. Reason: typo
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Old Wednesday 1st February 2017, 06:53   #47
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Calalp View Post
Polatzek, hmm ... looks more Hungarian to me (or of Hungarian Heritage). He could maybe be a; (Johan, János) Polatsek, Polátseck, Polaseck, Polazek, etc. If he was? I sure don´t know. Here I´m simply thinking out loud. If of any help?
You might be right and he might be born in Nagyléta today part of Létavértes if we look here or here as Polatzek János or here as Polatzek János államhivatalnok (Government official).

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Old Monday 20th February 2017, 08:02   #48
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The Australian field naturalist Mr. Clifton was/is most likely a Sheep and Cattle Station!

I doubt cliftoni ever was intended to be an eponym, but instead a toponym, as in:

• the invalid "Dacelo leachii cliftoni" MATHEWS 1912 (here) a k a "Pale Fawn-breasted Kingfisher"... however no dedication, nor explanation, in Mathews's usual way [synonym of Dacelo leachii occidentalis GOULD 1869].

The only clue: "Type, Carnavaron, West Australia ..."

... most likely the huge sheep and cattle station Clifton Downs, upper Gascoyne River, WA (established by Robert Edwin Bush as Pindandora Station in the 1880's, a k a "Clifton Downs", in 1920 reverted to Bidgemia Station), about 170 km East of Carnavaron

See here and here.

For what it´s worth!

Björn
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Old Wednesday 22nd February 2017, 09:20   #49
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I agree. Maybe the W. in The Eponym Dictionary of Birds derived from W. Clifton, Bristol? The W in there I would Interpret as well as a location as West Clifton, Bristol (which seems to be not related at all to this bird). Otherwise I do not have any explanation how the came to the conclusion W. Clifton (fl. 1912).
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Old Friday 26th January 2018, 11:45   #50
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beavani

Apart that the key has one more synonym with Beavan's Kingfisher (Alcedo beavani) Walden, 1874 I think The Eponym Dictionary of Birds is not correct with Dicrurus leucophaeus beavani Walden, 1867 instead Vauri 1949 would be correct. See here p. 243-246 where he described the history behind the name. Here he wrote:

Quote:
Discussion: Walden, who had made an extensive study of the drongos with a view to publishing a monograph on this family (said monograph apparently never reached publication), was of the opinion (1866) that the birds of the Himalayas were distinct from those of the rest of peninsular India and that accordingly they should be described and named. This was done two years later by Beavan (1868) from birds collected on June 2 at Simla. In acknowledgment of Walden's suggestion he called the new form Buchlanga waldeni. Bhuchanga, howrever, has since been merged under Dicrurus, and B. walkeni Beavan (1868) will need a new name as it is preoccupied by Dicrurus waldenii Schlegel (1866) for the Mayotte Drongo. As B. waldeni Beavan never received an adequate description and the present whereabouts of the type is uncertain, I thought it would be preferable to fix a definite type and to redescribe the populations of eastern Afghanistan and the lower Himalayas as a new form, which I have done as Dicrurus leucophaeus beavani.

Last edited by Taphrospilus : Friday 26th January 2018 at 16:56.
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