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Shieldbugs.

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Old Saturday 7th August 2004, 07:40   #101
harry eales
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kris
This is very similar to a Nezara viridula but it's not green and I found it on a thistle head in a wood in North Notts.
Any ideas !
Hello Kris,
What you photographed is a late instar nymph of the Sloe Bug Dolycoris baccarum Its favourite habitat is flowers along woodland edges or clearings, but like many other shieldbugs it can turn up in other situations elsewhere within its range. The clue that gives it away, are the fine hairs around the head and thorax.

There are some photographs of this species in the Shieldbugs ID column in this section of Bird Forum.

Ref. Nezara viridula Until recently this species was an accidental import with fruit and vegetables from the continent. However, in the past two years it appears that it has become established as a breeding species in southeast England.

Harry

Last edited by harry eales : Saturday 7th August 2004 at 07:43. Reason: grammatical error, there are probably others.
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Old Saturday 7th August 2004, 08:16   #102
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Thanks a lot. Did see the section on the shield bugs after I posted but I still wasn't too sure. Thanks for the new info on the Nezara viridula
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Old Saturday 7th August 2004, 18:39   #103
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I came home from Sheepwash Urban Park, near Dudley (having gone for the imm Night Heron) and when I returned home opened my log book and this was tucked away inbetween the pages.

Any ideas?
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Old Saturday 7th August 2004, 23:13   #104
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Reader
I came home from Sheepwash Urban Park, near Dudley (having gone for the imm Night Heron) and when I returned home opened my log book and this was tucked away inbetween the pages.

Any ideas?
Hi Reader,
Oh yes, I know what it is. A Birch Shieldbug Elasmostethus interstinctus A common species over most of the British Isles. A nice specimen as well.

Harry

Next please. lol.

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Old Sunday 8th August 2004, 06:04   #105
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Thanks Harry. I knew you wouldn't fail me. LOL
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Old Sunday 8th August 2004, 20:47   #106
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Unknown Welsh Bug

I took this pic at South Stack earlier this year - any idea what it is?
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Old Sunday 8th August 2004, 21:39   #107
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Sloe shieldbug?
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Old Sunday 8th August 2004, 21:47   #108
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One of the shield bugs, I think. Someone will know which, I expect. They're rather lovely.
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Old Monday 9th August 2004, 08:12   #109
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Confirmation please

Morning,

Am I right calling this Pentatoma rufipes?

Thanks,

André
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Old Monday 9th August 2004, 10:01   #110
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sloe bug - Dolycoris baccarum - see the shieldbugs thread, there is a quite recent picture that I put there and Harry Eales confirmed the ID.

Hugh
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Old Monday 9th August 2004, 10:18   #111
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gusford
I took this pic at South Stack earlier this year - any idea what it is?
Hello Hugh,
You'll have to read the Shieldbug thread sometime. There are several pictures of this Shieldbug and a pic of a nymph.

It is the Sloe bug D.baccarum. Just about everyone's seeing them but me
this year. (sob).

Harry
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Old Monday 9th August 2004, 11:16   #112
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jonafly
Morning,

Am I right calling this Pentatoma rufipes?

Thanks,

André
Hello Andre,
Yes you are correct, it is P.rufipes. Its common English name is The Forest Shieldbug, but it is by no means confined to woodland, it is also frequent in gardens and parks. The shape of the 'shoulders' is distinctive and diagnostic in this species, as are the red legs and the red spot at the base of the scutellum. One of the commonest species in Britain, and on the continent.

Harry

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Old Monday 9th August 2004, 12:38   #113
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Thank you Harry.

André
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Old Tuesday 10th August 2004, 11:32   #114
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Shield Bug from Budapest

Dear Harry
Not sure if this one might also occur in the UK - if so, could you let me know what it is? Much bright, lighter green than shows in the photo.
best
David
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Old Tuesday 10th August 2004, 12:40   #115
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Quote:
Originally Posted by black52bird
Dear Harry
Not sure if this one might also occur in the UK - if so, could you let me know what it is? Much bright, lighter green than shows in the photo.
best
David
Hi David,
I might still be able to ID this shieldbug, but I need the picture brightening up. I have tried to download it with the intention of doing just that, but my software will not permit me to do so.

Can you do this with your software? and then post it up again. Altering the exposure or contrast should do it, if you can try and get it to as near natural colour as you can.

There are lot more Shieldbugs in Europe than in Britain, but I do have a German book (very heavy going as it is in the German language) which covers most of the continental countries at least as far as the Shieldbugs go.

Harry
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Old Tuesday 10th August 2004, 17:40   #116
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Quote:
Originally Posted by harry eales
Hi David,
I might still be able to ID this shieldbug, but I need the picture brightening up. I have tried to download it with the intention of doing just that, but my software will not permit me to do so.

Harry
Is this any good Harry?
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Old Tuesday 10th August 2004, 18:14   #117
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Reader
Is this any good Harry?
Hello Reader and David,
First many thanks Reader for the improved clarity of the photograph.

Now the bad news, It's not a British or a western European species of Shieldbug. It is similar, but not identical, to Pitedia juniperina a fairly common continental species, unfortunately extinct in Britain since 1925. There is no other species that I have knowledge of, that it even resembles.

There are several green Shieldbugs both here and on the continent but this specimen does not appear in any of the identification books in my posession. In other words, I'm stuck.

If you still have the specimen David could you let me know the overall length of the beast from head to tail, not including the antennae. If you can, I will try and access some of the more obscure Russian and Eastern European Websites to see if I can find out what it is.

Not being able to ID it is really bugging me (pun intended).

Harry
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Old Friday 13th August 2004, 17:07   #118
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Hi,

below taken Stockton 5th August. I get a few shieldbugs but this is the first I have attempted (it was rather active) to photograph. I guess it is forest sheldbug from above post?

Regards,
Jamie
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Old Friday 13th August 2004, 17:13   #119
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Quote:
Originally Posted by J Duffie
Hi,

below taken Stockton 5th August. I get a few shieldbugs but this is the first I have attempted (it was rather active) to photograph. I guess it is forest sheldbug from above post?

Regards,
Jamie
Hi Jamie,
Your spot on with your ID. It is the Forest Shieldbug. Could you let me have the Grid Reference for your sighting I will add it to my local database. I'm always looking for additional records for Northumberland and Durham and would welcome any from your area. Even the commonest species are much under-recorded.

Regards,

Harry
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Old Sunday 15th August 2004, 08:28   #120
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Hi,

about 5 shield bugs around the garden moth traps this morning. Here is a picture of one. I guess from above it is Hawthorne or Birch but not sure how to separate. If you let me know I will try to id them in future

Thanks,
Jamie
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Old Sunday 15th August 2004, 08:53   #121
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Quote:
Originally Posted by J Duffie
Hi,

about 5 shield bugs around the garden moth traps this morning. Here is a picture of one. I guess from above it is Hawthorne or Birch but not sure how to separate. If you let me know I will try to id them in future

Thanks,
Jamie
Hello Jamie,
You have a Birch Shieldbug Elasmostethus interstinctus. The Hawthorn Shieldbug Acanthosoma haemorrhoidale is larger and has differently shaped 'shoulders'. A picture of this latter species can be seen in post #42 picture 1 in this thread (page 2).

The best readily available book on these 'bugs' is Roger D. Hawkins Shieldbugs of Surrey. It contains photographs of all the British species, and many nymphs and identification keys. At £15 for a hardback book it is very good value for money.

There are a good number of Shieldbugs displayed on the following website:-
http://www.bioimages.org.uk/

Some 14 species have been recorded from Northumberland and Durham. perhaps half of which are relatively common, or likely to be met with by the casual observer. If you have any problems with ID send me or post a picture here.

Harry
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Old Thursday 19th August 2004, 09:12   #122
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More heraldic bugs for Harry

The first of these was in a light trap on the Teifi estuary in Wales on 8th August and the other was on Lemon Verbena in my garden near Peterborough on 18th August.
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Old Thursday 19th August 2004, 09:21   #123
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The first of these was in a light trap on the Teifi estuary in Wales on 8th August and the other was on Lemon Verbena in my garden near Peterborough on 18th August.
Hello Brian,
Your specimens are:-
1. Forest Shieldbug, Pentatoma rufipes.
2. Birch Shieldbug, Elasmostethus interstinctus.

Both are common and widely distributed species, and are by no means confined to the areas or tree species that their common names suggest. They commonly turn up in suburban gardens and not infrequently in light traps.

Harry
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Old Thursday 19th August 2004, 16:29   #124
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Hi Brian

If you look to an earlier reply from me you will see that I attached a photo of the same shieldbug as your 2nd one and Harry Eales ID'd it as a Birch Shieldbug. I have no idea what the first one is but then again I know nothing about shieldbugs
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Old Thursday 19th August 2004, 17:03   #125
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Reader
Hi Brian

If you look to an earlier reply from me you will see that I attached a photo of the same shieldbug as your 2nd one and Harry Eales ID'd it as a Birch Shieldbug. I have no idea what the first one is but then again I know nothing about shieldbugs
Actually both these species have been posted more than twice in this column, but who's going to search through four pages of posts, lol.
I don't mind repeating myself and it does give new viewers to the column a variety of different shots to look at.

Harry
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