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Looking at eclipse???

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Old Monday 21st January 2019, 04:21   #1
chill6x6
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Looking at eclipse???

I hope you are! It's looking great thru the Maven B.2s and the Trinovid HDs!
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Old Monday 21st January 2019, 04:31   #2
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Im with you.....using bare eyes and a 1950s era Leitz 7x50....temp is around -1 here so only stepping out for a minute or so....sky is crystal clear....

Last edited by gunut : Monday 21st January 2019 at 04:47.
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Old Monday 21st January 2019, 04:50   #3
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Hello Chuck,

At 15F, or -13C, I cannot watch for long periods. I have seen the start of the shadow moving across the lunar disk. Now, I am going to look at the eclipse reach totality with my 7x50. My major problem is that the moon is close to the zenith.

P.S. I just returned from seeing totality. It was a real thrill to see the copper colour over much of the lunar disk.

Clear skies,
Arthur
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Old Monday 21st January 2019, 04:52   #4
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Originally Posted by gunut View Post
Im with you.....using bare eyes and a 1950s era Leitz 7x50....temp is around -1 here so only stepping out for a minute or so....sky is crystal clear....
Hello Gunut,

Are using a Marsept or a Marseptit. In either case, it would be a fine glass.

Clear skies,
Arthur
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Old Monday 21st January 2019, 04:55   #5
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Thin cloud layer here on southern California coast. Watched for a while with B&L Mark 28s, then switched to Trinovid 8x32s. Not much moon showing right now.
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Old Monday 21st January 2019, 05:09   #6
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I got pretty good looks with my 7x42 UVHD and my girlfriend was taking photos with the Panasonic FZ1000 I got her. Cool stuff...

Justin
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Old Monday 21st January 2019, 05:27   #7
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Full cloud cover here, but the clouds are showing a orangish-red color.
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Old Monday 21st January 2019, 05:34   #8
gunut
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pinewood View Post
Hello Gunut,

Are using a Marsept or a Marseptit. In either case, it would be a fine glass.

Clear skies,
Arthur
Pinewood;

using a center focus Marseptit…..thought about digging out a 8x60 late war Marocto IF ….but naaa the 7x50 did fine

Dave

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Old Monday 21st January 2019, 10:01   #9
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A bit cloudy at 5:40 on the Balearic Islands, but great sight nonetheless. Bare eyes was good, binoculars were better, but scope was best
I remember when I first saw the Galilean moons around Jupiter with the small scope I use for birdwatching, and then reading in awe that Galieo Galilei saw them first back in 1610 with a x20 telescope of his own invention. I wonder what could have Galileo do if we travelled back in time and handed him a humble Opticron MM3 60 and a x45 eyepiece
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Old Monday 21st January 2019, 11:12   #10
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Hi all,
Well done.

Here it was mainly cloudy in the early hours, and I didn't see much, although I have seen numerous lunar eclipses.
One was so dark that the Moon was almost invisible.
It depends on the positioning of the Moon relative to the Earth and cloud cover on the Earth.

In the U.S.A it was at a more friendly time.

Minus 2C here. (15F is minus 9C, i.e. quite cold).
Wind here northerly 2 knots. Cloud broken 3,000 ft 1024 hPa. visibility 5,000m haze.

P.S.
yarrellii, nice photo.
Nearly any scope is better than Galileo's very long single glass objective scope.

Some people see Jupiter's moons without optical aid.

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Old Monday 21st January 2019, 11:37   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Binastro View Post
Nearly any scope is better than Galileo's very long single glass objective scope.
Can you imagine Galileo's face if someone gave him a pair of current top-of-the-range Zeiss/Swarovski/Leica/etc.? Now that would be something inspiring :) I wonder what the transmission figure of his telescope could be...
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Old Monday 21st January 2019, 12:06   #12
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The transmission of Galileo's scope was possibly 80%.
I think that his original scope had only two pieces of glass.
A single element objective and single lens eyepiece.

I think that doublet objectives came in the early 1800s. (Correction. Chester Moore Hall c. 1730 invented first doublets. Kept secret and pinched by Dollond who patented it).
Huygens are two element eyepieces. (Invented late 1660s).

Even Herschel used single ball glass eyepieces giving extremely high magnification.

As scopes got larger in the 1600s they became enormously long aerial scopes with no tubes, as CA became impossible with shorter focal length single lens objectives.
Although transmission was high, unless it was pitch dark, which it never is, light intrusion must have been great.

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Old Monday 21st January 2019, 14:40   #13
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It was GREAT here in Alabama! Sky conditions were perfect....cold for US in the mid-20s. Probably one of the best ones I've seen. I couldn't use the binoculars on a tripod as the angle was pretty close to zenith. But I braced several on my porch post and was able to get an excellent view. SV 10X50 stole the show!
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Old Monday 21st January 2019, 14:53   #14
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I missed it since I don't stay up that late. But I did look at Venus right before dawn and I believe
Jupiter was below slightly to the right. Tomorrow morning those two planets should be in conjunction and closer
to each other. I'm just starting out with astronomy. Bought a beginner's book last week. I don't know what I'm doing yet, but will treat it as a more casual hobby compared to birding and take it slow. Not staying up late doesn't help, but there are still things to see early evening and before dawn. I had a telescope as a kid and learned some
stuff, but don't have a good ability to retain info. It's fun to learn and use binoculars for different observations.
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Old Monday 21st January 2019, 14:58   #15
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Totally clear skys until 01.00, brilliant full moon; full cloud on each of the three occasions I looked after that, so dipped it.
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Old Monday 21st January 2019, 15:19   #16
doug el10x32
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Hi,

The eclipse was perfect and very clear skies. Had to bring out the Canon IS 15x50’s for this one. With the bright limb edge it was almost seen as being 3D !

Doug...
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Old Monday 21st January 2019, 15:22   #17
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Great views in Delaware through 7x42 UV HD+
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Old Monday 21st January 2019, 15:23   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yarrellii View Post
Can you imagine Galileo's face if someone gave him a pair of current top-of-the-range Zeiss/Swarovski/Leica/etc.? Now that would be something inspiring :) I wonder what the transmission figure of his telescope could be...
I can see it now ...

First look through the Zeiss ... "what's this miserable green color cast!", then he
spikes it to the ground.

A look through the Swaro ... "what's this sickening panning motion !" , then he
throws it against the nearest tree trunk.

Finally the Leica .. "what's this ghastly color fringing!" , then he punts it into the pond.

Back to his scope ... "ahhh they don't make them like they used to..."
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Old Monday 21st January 2019, 16:36   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gilmore Girl View Post
I can see it now ...

First look through the Zeiss ... "what's this miserable green color cast!", then he
spikes it to the ground.

A look through the Swaro ... "what's this sickening panning motion !" , then he
throws it against the nearest tree trunk.

Finally the Leica .. "what's this ghastly color fringing!" , then he punts it into the pond.

Back to his scope ... "ahhh they don't make them like they used to..."
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Old Monday 21st January 2019, 16:37   #20
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Cloud cover got thicker as the eclipse progressed. Not much to see unfortunately. A little glow here and there as it progressed.
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Old Monday 21st January 2019, 16:51   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gilmore Girl View Post
I can see it now ...

First look through the Zeiss ... "what's this miserable green color cast!", then he
spikes it to the ground.

A look through the Swaro ... "what's this sickening panning motion !" , then he
throws it against the nearest tree trunk.

Finally the Leica .. "what's this ghastly color fringing!" , then he punts it into the pond.

Back to his scope ... "ahhh they don't make them like they used to..."
But you forgot about when he looked through the Nikon and found the image so dark he catapulted it into the sky...

Justin
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Old Monday 21st January 2019, 19:50   #22
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Nice views/clear sky (with SLC 15X56/FL10X56/EL SV8.5X42)) of the moon just south of zenith with orion/belt sword to the southwest, bee hive cluster and Pleiades moving west with the big dipper to the northeast. A bit cold so only about a half hour, then into the heat.

Andy W.
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Old Tuesday 22nd January 2019, 07:15   #23
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2*F last night, but worth it. A wonderful ruddy color. Have there been any volcanic eruptions lately?

I thought Galileo went blind from looking at the Sun too long. All he would need is a monovid for his good eye.
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Old Tuesday 22nd January 2019, 10:57   #24
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Hi peatmoss
I am not sure about Galileo, but I think that Newton had at least one damaged eye from solar observation.
I think that many early astronomers had eye damage from the Sun.

My colleague, who passed away a couple of years ago at an early age, had instant eye damage using a 25mm aperture scope with either 4 or 8 stacked sunglasses lenses that he though would make a good solar filter.
He was eleven years old when he did this and never told anybody for years.
He became a world class lunar observer and lunar artist using his good eye.

Sir Roger Moore, I think, damaged his eyesight permanently from the idiotic advice given to actors to stare at the Sun to prevent them blinking on camera. He wore strong glasses as a result of this.

Some U.S. soldiers got sent home from Vietnam because of deliberate permanent eye damage. 30 seconds was the recommended exposure. However, doctors easily saw that it was deliberate as the shooting eye was damaged, not both.

Staring at the Sun even without optical aid is bad news.
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Old Tuesday 22nd January 2019, 21:12   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gilmore Girl View Post
I can see it now ...

First look through the Zeiss ... "what's this miserable green color cast!", then he
spikes it to the ground.

A look through the Swaro ... "what's this sickening panning motion !" , then he
throws it against the nearest tree trunk.

Finally the Leica .. "what's this ghastly color fringing!" , then he punts it into the pond.

Back to his scope ... "ahhh they don't make them like they used to..."
Quote:
Originally Posted by jremmons View Post
But you forgot about when he looked through the Nikon and found the image so dark he catapulted it into the sky...

Justin
Well done Gigi and Justin! Made me laugh and smile. Thanks for that.

As for the eclipse, we went to bed in a rainstorm. It shortly began to hail loudly, then I slept soundly til morning.

My most memorable view of a lunar eclipse was on a backpacking trip in the Easter Sierra in 2007 to Garnet Lake, at 9700 ft. I had a pair of Canon 15x50 IS, and some Carton 7x50 'Adlerblicks' with me. Here's some notes from that eclipse:

.....I was quite interested in watching the lunar eclipse, and set my alarm for 3 am. It wasn't hard to get up, as sleep was erratic, due to regular visits by a bear who kept nosing around my neighbor's tent, like a curious dog. I could never hear him approach, but the sound of my neighbor yelling at the bear woke me up every time. By 3:00, the total eclipse was on, and the night sky had changed dramatically. Suddenly it looked like a good night at Mt. Lassen, with no light domes. An unexpected bonus! You could see the milky way right down to the horizon. My tent was in the trees, so I grabbed my observing gear and walked down to an open area near the lake.
There was a full moon, but it was if a dimmer switch had toned it down to tolerable levels. The moon was a copper colored ball with a brighter edge, almost annular in character. The winter sky was rising, Orion's 3 belt stars standing vertically above a polished granite slab between the pines. During totality 2 of my companions and I looked at quite a few objects: M37, M36, M42, M35, M31 w/ companions, and M33. What surprised me was that M36 and M37 were easily seen naked eye. M33, or stars near it, produced a naked eye patch, which I was very skeptical of, yet I discussed it with my companions, and even traded laser and binocular between us, so we could take turns pointing the laser to the spot. It was dark. Not too bad for a full moon.

We kept checking the moon, as its color was a beautiful warm, deep, glow. What made it even more interesting was that several faint stars were visible right next to it. It resembled more a decorative science fiction book cover illustration than the glaring, grey face it presents when not shadowed.


____________________________________

ah, the wonders we miss when we sleep. Thanks everyone for sharing their observations.

-B.
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