Join for FREE
It only takes a minute!
Discover the ZEISS Digital Nature Hub

Welcome to BirdForum.
BirdForum is the net's largest birding community, dedicated to wild birds and birding, and is absolutely FREE! You are most welcome to register for an account, which allows you to take part in lively discussions in the forum, post your pictures in the gallery and more.

Scolopaci

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rating: Thread Rating: 5 votes, 5.00 average.
Old Sunday 4th February 2018, 12:12   #51
Peter Kovalik
Registered User
 
Peter Kovalik's Avatar

 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Sp. Hrhov
Posts: 3,239
Phalaropus lobatus

Liu, W., Hu, C., Xie, W. et al. The mitochondrial genome of red-necked phalarope Phalaropus lobatus (Charadriiformes: Scolopacidae) and phylogeny analysis among Scolopacidae. Genes Genom (2018). https://doi.org/10.1007/s13258-017-0632-6

Abstract:

The red-necked phalarope is a wonderful species with specific morphological characters and lifestyles. Mitochondrial genomes, encoding necessary proteins involved in the system of energy metabolism, are important for the evolution and adaption of species. In this study, we determined the complete mitogenome sequence of Phalaropus lobatus (Charadriiformes: Scolopacidae). The circular genome is 16714 bp in size, containing 13 PCGs, two ribosomal RNAs and 22 tRNAs and a high AT-rich control region. The AT skew and GC skew of major strand is positive and negative respectively. Most of PCGs are biased towards A-rich except ND1. A codon usage analysis shows that 3 start codons (ATG, GTG and ATA), 4 stop codons (TAA, TAG, AGG, AGA) and two incomplete terminate codons (T–). Twenty two transfer RNAs have the typical cloverleaf structure, and a total of ten base pairs are mismatched throughout the nine tRNA genes. The phylogenetic tree based on 13 PCGs and 2 rRNA genes indicates that monophyly of the family and genus Phalaropus is close to genus Xenus plus Tringa. The analysis of selective pressure shows 13 protein-coding genes are evolving under the purifying selection and P. lobatus is different from other Scolopacidae species on the selective pressure of gene ND4. This study helps us know the inherent mechanism of mitochondrial structure and natural selection.


full pdf here
Peter Kovalik is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Tuesday 16th April 2019, 19:30   #52
l_raty
laurent raty
 
l_raty's Avatar

 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Brussels, Belgium
Posts: 3,606
Numenius tenuirostris

Sharko FS, Boulygina ES, Rastorguev SM, Tsygankova SV, Tomkovich PS, Nedoluzhko AV. Phylogenetic position of the presumably extinct slender-billed curlew, Numenius tenuirostris. Mitoch. DNA A: in press.
[abstract & free supp.info.] [free pdf here]
[sequence] (Not yet released.)

Abstract

The high-capacity DNA analysis of museum samples opens new opportunities, associated with the investigation of extinct species evolution. Here, the complete mitochondrial genome of the presumably extinct bird species, the slender-billed curlew Numenius tenuirostris (Charadriiformes: Scolopacidae) is presented. Our results showed that mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is 16,705 base pairs (bp) in length and contain 13 protein-coding genes, two rRNA genes, and 22 tRNA genes. The overall base composition of the genome is 30.8% – A, 29.8% – C, 25.4% – T, 14.0% – G, and without a significant GC bias of 43.7%. Phylogenetic analyses based on the cytochrome B (cytB) gene and the whole mtDNA sequences revealed that N. tenuirostris had a close genetic relationship to Eurasian curlew (N. arquata), Far Eastern curlew (N. madagascariensis), and long-billed curlew – N. americanus. Besides, it reveals that Numenius genus is genetically distant from other Scolopacidae taxons. Together, these results provide a clear genetic perspective into the speciation process among the curlew genus members and points to a clear taxonomic position of N. tenuirostris.

Keywords: Extinction, historical DNA, Scolopacidae, mitochondrial genome, museum specimen

Last edited by l_raty : Tuesday 16th April 2019 at 19:45.
l_raty is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Friday 6th December 2019, 06:44   #53
Peter Kovalik
Registered User
 
Peter Kovalik's Avatar

 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Sp. Hrhov
Posts: 3,239
Gallinago magellanica, G. paraguaiae

Proposal (843) to SACC

Split Gallinago magellanica from G. paraguaiae and establish English names for both species


References

Miller, E. H., J. I. Areta, A. Jaramillo, S. Imberti, and R. Matus (2019). Snipe taxonomy based on vocal and non-vocal sound displays: the South American Snipe is two species. Ibis: https://doi.org/10.1111/ibi.12795

Abstract:

We analyzed breeding sounds of the two subspecies of South American Snipe Gallinago p. paraguaiae and G. p. magellanica to determine whether they may be different species: loud vocalizations given on the ground, and the tail‐generated Winnow given in aerial display. Sounds of the two taxa differ qualitatively and quantitatively. Both taxa utter two types of ground call. In paraguaiae, the calls are bouts of identical sound elements repeated rhythmically and slowly (about 5 elements per sec [Hz]) or rapidly (about 11 Hz). One call of magellanica is qualitatively similar to those of paraguaiae but sound elements are repeated more slowly (about 3 Hz). However its other call type differs strikingly: it is a bout of rhythmically repeated sound couplets, each containing two kinds of sound element. The Winnow of paraguaiae is a series of sound elements that gradually increase in duration and energy; that of magellanica has two+ kinds of sound element that roughly alternate and are repeated as sets, imparting a stuttering quality. Sounds of the related Puna Snipe (G. andina) resemble but differ quantitatively from those of paraguaiae. Differences in breeding sounds of G. p. paraguaiae and G. p. magellanica are strong and hold throughout their geographic range. Therefore we suggest that the two taxa be considered as different species: G. paraguaiae east of the Andes in much of South America except Patagonia, and G. magellanica in central and southern Chile, Argentina east of the Andes across Patagonia, and Falklands/Malvinas.

Last edited by Peter Kovalik : Friday 6th December 2019 at 06:47. Reason: References
Peter Kovalik is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Friday 6th December 2019, 14:24   #54
pbjosh
Registered User

 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Buenos Aires
Posts: 1,215
For anyone interested, I did some looking into where the break between magellanica and paraguaiae occurs in Argentina. I don't yet have access to the paper, but looking at records and recordings and the biogeographic boundaries, it seems to be:

In all of Chile, and all of Argentine Patagonia, up to and including the provinces of Rio Negro and Neuquen, you have magellanica. I believe magellanica continues up along the base of the Andes are far north as the city of Mendoza, more or less.

East of the Andes from Colombia and Venezuela south to the southernmost extent of the Chaco and Pampa biomes in Argentina, you have paraguaiae. IE, the provinces of Cordoba, Santa Fe, Entre Rios, and at least most of Buenos Aires province, should all be paraguaiae.

Thus the break between the two looks to be the division of the moister/warmer chaco and pampa from the patagonian steppe / monte, which occurs roughly along a line drawn between the cities of Mendoza and Bahia Blanca.

I am not certain where exactly the break occurs along the Atlantic coast. I believe birds in N Buenos Aires province, at least in breeding season, should safely be paraguaiae. But around Bahia Blanca, I am not certain.

If anyone sees errors with this please do correct me - I'm not purporting to be an expert on the matter, I was just curious and spent an hour or so poking around ML, XC, and eBird looking at substantiated records and seeing what I could figure out.
pbjosh is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Friday 6th December 2019, 14:47   #55
Nutcracker
Stop Brexit!
 
Nutcracker's Avatar

 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: UK
Posts: 20,683
Quote:
Originally Posted by pbjosh View Post
.... I don't yet have access to the paper, ...
Here you are (draft copy): https://sci-hub.tw/10.1111/ibi.12795
Nutcracker is online now  
Reply With Quote
Old Friday 27th December 2019, 01:06   #56
Scelorchilus
Registered User

 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: California
Posts: 48
We do not yet have the final pdf of the paper. Sorry about this. When we get one, I can put up a link to the final version of the paper.
Scelorchilus is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Tuesday 9th June 2020, 06:34   #57
Peter Kovalik
Registered User
 
Peter Kovalik's Avatar

 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Sp. Hrhov
Posts: 3,239
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter Kovalik View Post
Proposal (843) to SACC

Split Gallinago magellanica from G. paraguaiae and establish English names for both species
PASSED (8 June 2020). Not yet implemented; needs new proposal on English name for G. paraguaiae.
Peter Kovalik is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Friday 12th June 2020, 14:24   #58
Nutcracker
Stop Brexit!
 
Nutcracker's Avatar

 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: UK
Posts: 20,683
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter Kovalik View Post
PASSED (8 June 2020). Not yet implemented; needs new proposal on English name for G. paraguaiae.
Paraguayan Snipe (from the sci name) would seem the most sensible?
Nutcracker is online now  
Reply With Quote
Old Friday 12th June 2020, 15:50   #59
pbjosh
Registered User

 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Buenos Aires
Posts: 1,215
I think Paraguayan Snipe is fine and agree largely with Alvaro's logic in the comments. It would be nice, in some ways, to retain South American Snipe for stability despite the "rename daughters of splits" rule, but I don't see that it really can be retained - despite the enormous range of paraguaiae vs magellanica, magellanica may well be the more commonly observed species. If it's not more commonly observed, it's at least about equal. This is really different from, for instance, the Russet Antshrike split where one of the daughters of the split accounts for 95% or so of observations!
pbjosh is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Monday 22nd June 2020, 18:00   #60
Peter Kovalik
Registered User
 
Peter Kovalik's Avatar

 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Sp. Hrhov
Posts: 3,239
Prosobonia cancellata

Justin J. F. J. Jansen, Alice Cibois. Clarifying the morphology of the enigmatic Kiritimati Sandpiper Prosobonia cancellata (J. F. Gmelin, 1785), based on a review of the contemporary data. Bulletin of the British Ornithologists’ Club, 140(2):142-146 (2020). https://doi.org/10.25226/bboc.v140i2.2020.a4

Abstract:

The extinct Kiritimati Sandpiper Prosobonia cancellata is known from a single contemporaneous illustration by William Wade Ellis and a description by William Anderson. We reproduce Ellis' illustration for the first time, and we consider the illustration as almost in line with Anderson's description. Further, using both Anderson's work and Ellis' illustration, we prepared a description of the bird to replace Latham's interpretation of the depiction. Finally, we show that Kiritimati Sandpiper possessed several unique morphological characters.

[full article]
Peter Kovalik is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Monday 22nd June 2020, 18:21   #61
LeNomenclatoriste
Taxonomy and zoological nomenclature
 
LeNomenclatoriste's Avatar

 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: France
Posts: 917
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter Kovalik View Post
Justin J. F. J. Jansen, Alice Cibois. Clarifying the morphology of the enigmatic Kiritimati Sandpiper Prosobonia cancellata (J. F. Gmelin, 1785), based on a review of the contemporary data. Bulletin of the British Ornithologists’ Club, 140(2):142-146 (2020). https://doi.org/10.25226/bboc.v140i2.2020.a4

Abstract:

The extinct Kiritimati Sandpiper Prosobonia cancellata is known from a single contemporaneous illustration by William Wade Ellis and a description by William Anderson. We reproduce Ellis' illustration for the first time, and we consider the illustration as almost in line with Anderson's description. Further, using both Anderson's work and Ellis' illustration, we prepared a description of the bird to replace Latham's interpretation of the depiction. Finally, we show that Kiritimati Sandpiper possessed several unique morphological characters.

[full article]
Five species?
LeNomenclatoriste is online now  
Reply With Quote
Old Monday 22nd June 2020, 20:42   #62
gusasp
Registered User

 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Stockholm, Sweden
Posts: 155
Quote:
Originally Posted by LeNomenclatoriste View Post
Five species?
The fifth is from Henderson, known only from bones but for some reason undescribed.
gusasp is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Tuesday 23rd June 2020, 06:01   #63
JustinJansen
Registered User
 
JustinJansen's Avatar

 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Grave, The Netherlands
Posts: 471
Paper is submitted for the fifth.
__________________
Justin Jansen
The Netherlands
JustinJansen is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Tuesday 23rd June 2020, 07:19   #64
Fred Ruhe
Registered User

 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Diemen
Posts: 1,938
Quote:
Originally Posted by gusasp View Post
The fifth is from Henderson, known only from bones but for some reason undescribed.
Hmm, I never heard of this one. I heard of a Prosobonia sp. nov. Steadman, 1995. from the Holocene of Mangaia in the Cook Islands, Polynesia that still is undescribed. But Mangaia is not Henderson Island.

Reference:

David William Steadman, 1995
Prehistoric Extinctions of Pacific Island Birds: Biodiversity Meets Zooarchaeology
Science 267: 1123-1131; table 3 page 1127

Fred
Fred Ruhe is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Tuesday 23rd June 2020, 07:25   #65
Fred Ruhe
Registered User

 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Diemen
Posts: 1,938
Quote:
Originally Posted by JustinJansen View Post
Paper is submitted for the fifth.
Hi Justin,

Can you give some details about this paper, like author(s)?

Fred

Last edited by Fred Ruhe : Tuesday 23rd June 2020 at 11:18.
Fred Ruhe is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Tuesday 23rd June 2020, 10:56   #66
jurek
Registered User
 
jurek's Avatar

 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Switzerland/Poland
Posts: 4,354
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter Kovalik View Post
Justin J. F. J. Jansen, Alice Cibois. Clarifying the morphology of the enigmatic Kiritimati Sandpiper Prosobonia cancellata (J. F. Gmelin, 1785), based on a review of the contemporary data. Bulletin of the British Ornithologists’ Club, 140(2):142-146 (2020). https://doi.org/10.25226/bboc.v140i2.2020.a4

Abstract:

The extinct Kiritimati Sandpiper Prosobonia cancellata is known from a single contemporaneous illustration by William Wade Ellis and a description by William Anderson. We reproduce Ellis' illustration for the first time, and we consider the illustration as almost in line with Anderson's description. Further, using both Anderson's work and Ellis' illustration, we prepared a description of the bird to replace Latham's interpretation of the depiction. Finally, we show that Kiritimati Sandpiper possessed several unique morphological characters.

[full article]
Frankly, the illustration and the description could match several migrant or vagrant waders.

Even if small details do not match common migrant waders, details also do not match between the illustration and the description either, which suggests not very detailed reporting: supercilium reaching far to the nape/reaching to the eye, belly brown (suggesting Prosobonia)/belly white with limited pattern.
jurek is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Tuesday 23rd June 2020, 18:06   #67
JustinJansen
Registered User
 
JustinJansen's Avatar

 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Grave, The Netherlands
Posts: 471
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fred Ruhe View Post
Hi Justin,

Can you give some details about this paper, like author(s)?

Fred
Hi Fred,

It is cited in our paper:
De Pietri, V. L., Worthy, T. H., Scofield, R. P., Cole, T. L., Wood, J. R., Cibois, A., Jansen J. J. F. J., Zhang, G., Mitchell, K. J., Feng, S., Chen, W., Tennyson, A. J. D. & Wragg, G. M. submitted. A new species of Polynesian sandpiper (Charadriiformes: Scolopacidae: Prosobonia) from Henderson Island, Pitcairn Group, and the scolopacid affinities of Prosobonia. Zool. J. Linn. Soc.

Yours, Justin
__________________
Justin Jansen
The Netherlands
JustinJansen is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Tuesday 23rd June 2020, 18:20   #68
Fred Ruhe
Registered User

 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Diemen
Posts: 1,938
Quote:
Originally Posted by JustinJansen View Post
Hi Fred,

It is cited in our paper:
De Pietri, V. L., Worthy, T. H., Scofield, R. P., Cole, T. L., Wood, J. R., Cibois, A., Jansen J. J. F. J., Zhang, G., Mitchell, K. J., Feng, S., Chen, W., Tennyson, A. J. D. & Wragg, G. M. submitted. A new species of Polynesian sandpiper (Charadriiformes: Scolopacidae: Prosobonia) from Henderson Island, Pitcairn Group, and the scolopacid affinities of Prosobonia. Zool. J. Linn. Soc.

Yours, Justin
I bewlieve you when you say it is cited, but unfortunately I have computer problems, I cannot download anything, the only thing partly working is internet. But many thanks for citing it again!

All the best,

Fred
Fred Ruhe is offline  
Reply With Quote
Advertisement
Reply


Thread Tools
Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

{googleads}

Fatbirder's Top 1000 Birding Websites

Help support BirdForum

Page generated in 0.23090792 seconds with 32 queries
All times are GMT. The time now is 00:05.