Join for FREE
It only takes a minute!
Discover the ZEISS Digital Nature Hub

Welcome to BirdForum.
BirdForum is the net's largest birding community, dedicated to wild birds and birding, and is absolutely FREE! You are most welcome to register for an account, which allows you to take part in lively discussions in the forum, post your pictures in the gallery and more.

Phasianidae

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rating: Thread Rating: 4 votes, 5.00 average.
Old Monday 8th February 2016, 17:46   #26
Peter Kovalik
Registered User
 
Peter Kovalik's Avatar

 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Sp. Hrhov
Posts: 3,240
Chrysolophus pictus

Q.-Q. Zeng, G.-H. Zhong, K. He, D.-D. Sun and Q.-H. Wan. Molecular characterization of classical and nonclassical MHC class I genes from the golden pheasant (Chrysolophus pictus). International Journal of Immunogenetics. Volume 43, Issue 1, February 2016, Pages: 8–17.

[PDF]
Peter Kovalik is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Friday 12th February 2016, 17:29   #27
Peter Kovalik
Registered User
 
Peter Kovalik's Avatar

 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Sp. Hrhov
Posts: 3,240
Nicholas W. Persons, Peter A. Hosner, Kelly A. Meiklejohn, Edward L. Braun, Rebecca T. Kimball. Sorting out relationships among the grouse and ptarmigan using intron, mitochondrial, and ultra-conserved element sequences. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, In Press, Available online 12 February 2016.

[Abstract]
Peter Kovalik is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Thursday 18th February 2016, 12:01   #28
Richard Klim
-------------------------
 
Richard Klim's Avatar

 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Somerset, UK
Posts: 12,792
Golden Pheasant

Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter Kovalik View Post
Q.-Q. Zeng, G.-H. Zhong, K. He, D.-D. Sun and Q.-H. Wan. Molecular characterization of classical and nonclassical MHC class I genes from the golden pheasant (Chrysolophus pictus). International Journal of Immunogenetics. Volume 43, Issue 1, February 2016, Pages: 8–17. [PDF]
Zeng, He, Sun, Ma, Ge, Fang & Wan 2016. Balancing selection and recombination as evolutionary forces caused population genetic variations in golden pheasant MHC class I genes. BMC Evol Biol 16: 42. [article & pdf]
Richard Klim is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Sunday 21st February 2016, 13:52   #29
Richard Klim
-------------------------
 
Richard Klim's Avatar

 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Somerset, UK
Posts: 12,792
Tetraonini

Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter Kovalik View Post
Nicholas W. Persons, Peter A. Hosner, Kelly A. Meiklejohn, Edward L. Braun, Rebecca T. Kimball. Sorting out relationships among the grouse and ptarmigan using intron, mitochondrial, and ultra-conserved element sequences. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, In Press, Available online 12 February 2016. [Abstract]
Persons et al (in press). [pdf]
Richard Klim is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Sunday 21st February 2016, 14:38   #30
LeNomenclatoriste
Taxonomy and zoological nomenclature
 
LeNomenclatoriste's Avatar

 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: France
Posts: 920
Their work don't change taxonomy, falcipennis into Falcipennis, canadensis into Canachites and voilà ! Why complicate life ?
LeNomenclatoriste is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Tuesday 7th March 2017, 18:05   #31
Peter Kovalik
Registered User
 
Peter Kovalik's Avatar

 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Sp. Hrhov
Posts: 3,240
Chrysolophus pictus

Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Klim View Post
Zeng, He, Sun, Ma, Ge, Fang & Wan 2016. Balancing selection and recombination as evolutionary forces caused population genetic variations in golden pheasant MHC class I genes. BMC Evol Biol 16: 42. [article & pdf]
Ke He, Hong-Yi Liu, Yun-Fa Ge, Shao-Ying Wu, Qiu-Hong Wan. Historical gene flow and profound spatial genetic structure among golden pheasant populations suggested by multi-locus analysis. Molecular Phzlogenetics and Evolution, In Press, Accepted Manuscript, Available online 7 March 2017.

Abstract:

Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is a good marker system for geographical genetics since they are functional genes in the immune system that are likely to affect the fitness of the individual, and the survival and evolutionary potential of a population in a changing environment. Golden pheasant (Chrysolophus pictus) is a wild Phasianidae distributed in central and north China. In this study, we used a locus-specific genotyping technique for MHC IIB genes of golden pheasant. Combining with microsatellites (simple sequence repeat, SSR) and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) D-loop region, we investigated the demographic history and illuminate genetic structure of this bird in detail. SYR (south of Yangtze river) –NYR (north of Yangtze river) lineages, separated by Yangtze River, were defined in genetic structure of MHC IIB. NYR was supposed as refuge during glacial period, suggested by diversity parameters and more ancient alleles in this region. Based on this hypothesis, there was gene flow from NYR to SYR, which was proved by three pieces of evidence: (1) distinct demographic histories of SYR (kept stable) and NYR (experienced expansion); (2) specific affiliation of LC in genetic structure of SSR and MHC genes; (3) significant gene flow from NYR to SYR. Moreover, we also found balancing selection by combination of three Grouping A2’s regions (SC, QL and North) into one in Grouping B4 (NYR) and no pattern of isolation by distance (IBD) found in MHC IIB, whereas for SSR we found a relatively strong and significant IBD. Several mechanisms in the evolution of MHC IIB genes, including recombination, historically positive selection, trans-species evolution and concerted evolution, were shown by molecular and phylogenetic analysis. Overall these results suggest the Yangtze River was inferred to be a geological barrier for this avian and NYR might experience population expansion, which invaded into a neighboring region. This study contributes to the understanding of the effects of geographic features on contemporary patterns of genetic variation in the golden pheasant in China, and helps us to define the adaptive unite (AU) for this avian.
Peter Kovalik is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Wednesday 3rd May 2017, 20:42   #32
l_raty
laurent raty
 
l_raty's Avatar

 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Brussels, Belgium
Posts: 3,607
Hosner, Tobias, Braun, Kimball. 2017. How do seemingly non-vagile clades accomplish trans-marine dispersal? Trait and dispersal evolution in the landfowl (Aves: Galliformes). Proc. R. Soc. B 284:20170210.
[abstract] [supp.mat.1(FigShare)] [supp.mat.2(Dryad)]

Last edited by l_raty : Thursday 4th May 2017 at 06:15. Reason: supp.mat.2
l_raty is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Wednesday 27th December 2017, 06:59   #33
Peter Kovalik
Registered User
 
Peter Kovalik's Avatar

 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Sp. Hrhov
Posts: 3,240
Pheasants

Cai T, Fjeldså J, Wu Y, et al. What makes the Sino-Himalayan mountains the major diversity hotspots for pheasants? J Biogeogr. 2017;00:1–12. https://doi.org/10.1111/jbi.13156

[abstract]
Peter Kovalik is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Saturday 16th June 2018, 12:06   #34
l_raty
laurent raty
 
l_raty's Avatar

 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Brussels, Belgium
Posts: 3,607
Syrmaticus mikado

Lee, Hsieh, Chiang, Chattopadhyay, Li, Lee, Lu, Lai, Lin, Lee, Ding, Tsai, Chen, Chuang. 2018. Whole-genome de novo sequencing reveals unique genes that contributed to the adaptive evolution of the Mikado pheasant. GigaScience, 7(5): giy044.
https://doi.org/10.1093/gigascience/giy044

Abstract
Background
The Mikado pheasant (Syrmaticus mikado) is a nearly endangered species indigenous to high-altitude regions of Taiwan. This pheasant provides an opportunity to investigate evolutionary processes following geographic isolation. Currently, the genetic background and adaptive evolution of the Mikado pheasant remain unclear.
Results
We present the draft genome of the Mikado pheasant, which consists of 1.04 Gb of DNA and 15,972 annotated protein-coding genes. The Mikado pheasant displays expansion and positive selection of genes related to features that contribute to its adaptive evolution, such as energy metabolism, oxygen transport, hemoglobin binding, radiation response, immune response, and DNA repair. To investigate the molecular evolution of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) across several avian species, 39 putative genes spanning 227 kb on a contiguous region were annotated and manually curated. The MHC loci of the pheasant revealed a high level of synteny, several rapidly evolving genes, and inverse regions compared to the same loci in the chicken. The complete mitochondrial genome was also sequenced, assembled, and compared against four long-tailed pheasants. The results from molecular clock analysis suggest that ancestors of the Mikado pheasant migrated from the north to Taiwan about 3.47 million years ago.
Conclusions
This study provides a valuable genomic resource for the Mikado pheasant, insights into its adaptation to high altitude, and the evolutionary history of the genus Syrmaticus, which could potentially be useful for future studies that investigate molecular evolution, genomics, ecology, and immunogenetics.

Last edited by l_raty : Saturday 16th June 2018 at 12:12.
l_raty is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Saturday 16th June 2018, 12:14   #35
l_raty
laurent raty
 
l_raty's Avatar

 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Brussels, Belgium
Posts: 3,607
Coturnix japonica

Wu, Zhang, Hou, Fan, Pi, Sun, Chen, Liu, Du, Shen, Hu, Chen, Pan, Yin, Chen, Pu, Zhang, Liang, Jian, Zhang, Wu, Sun, Chen, Tao, Yang, Xiao, Yang, Zheng, Bai, Fang, Burt, Wang, Li, Xu, Li, Yang, Wang, Yang, Liu, Du. 2018. Population genomic data reveal genes related to important traits of quail. GigaScience, 7(5): giy049.
https://doi.org/10.1093/gigascience/giy049

Abstract
Background
Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica), a recently domesticated poultry species, is important not only as an agricultural product, but also as a model bird species for genetic research. However, most of the biological questions concerning genomics, phylogenetics, and genetics of some important economic traits have not been answered. It is thus necessary to complete a high-quality genome sequence as well as a series of comparative genomics, evolution, and functional studies.
Results
Here, we present a quail genome assembly spanning 1.04 Gb with 86.63% of sequences anchored to 30 chromosomes (28 autosomes and 2 sex chromosomes Z/W). Our genomic data have resolved the long-term debate of phylogeny among Perdicinae (Japanese quail), Meleagridinae (turkey), and Phasianinae (chicken). Comparative genomics and functional genomic data found that four candidate genes involved in early maturation had experienced positive selection, and one of them encodes follicle stimulating hormone beta (FSHβ), which is correlated with different FSHβ levels in quail and chicken. We re-sequenced 31 quails (10 wild, 11 egg-type, and 10 meat-type) and identified 18 and 26 candidate selective sweep regions in the egg-type and meat-type lines, respectively. That only one of them is shared between egg-type and meat-type lines suggests that they were subject to an independent selection. We also detected a haplotype on chromosome Z, which was closely linked with maroon/yellow plumage in quail using population resequencing and a genome-wide association study. This haplotype block will be useful for quail breeding programs.
Conclusions
This study provided a high-quality quail reference genome, identified quail-specific genes, and resolved quail phylogeny. We have identified genes related to quail early maturation and a marker for plumage color, which is significant for quail breeding. These results will facilitate biological discovery in quails and help us elucidate the evolutionary processes within the Phasianidae family.
l_raty is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Monday 22nd June 2020, 18:13   #36
Peter Kovalik
Registered User
 
Peter Kovalik's Avatar

 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Sp. Hrhov
Posts: 3,240
Rheinardia ocellata nigrescens

G. W. H. Davison, Peter Boesman, N. J. Collar, C. L. Puan. Species rank for Rheinardia ocellata nigrescens (Phasianidae). Bulletin of the British Ornithologists’ Club, 140(2):182-194 (2020). https://doi.org/10.25226/bboc.v140i2.2020.a9

Abstract:

Crested Argus Rheinardia ocellata has two highly disjunct populations in Vietnam and Lao PDR (nominate ocellata) and Malaysia (subspecies nigrescens). When evidence from the small sample of museum specimens is supplemented by novel photographic and acoustic evidence, Malaysian nigrescens proves to be distinct on a suite of characters: yellower bill with blackish nares, buffier supercilium, throat and breast, different-coloured and -structured crest, different-patterned upperparts and tail, a purer, more fluent, longer, lower Short Call (used by advertising males), markedly divergent from the explosive, nasal, double-noted equivalent in nominate ocellata, and a higher number of loud notes in the Long Call including an unexplained bimodal vs. unimodal pattern (hence either average 8.6 or 14.5 vs. 7.1 loud notes per call). In combination these characters indicate a level of differentiation compatible with species rank for nigrescens, and this is strongly reflected in Tobias criteria scoring. The conservation of the two forms requires urgent reconsideration.

[full article]
Peter Kovalik is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Tuesday 23rd June 2020, 15:44   #37
James Lowther
Registered User

 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Weymouth
Posts: 2,877
Ocellata sensu stricto going to be a super difficult species to see presumably. And maybe critically endangered?
James
James Lowther is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Tuesday 23rd June 2020, 17:18   #38
DMW
Registered User
 
DMW's Avatar

 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Jersey
Posts: 2,049
Quote:
Originally Posted by James Lowther View Post
Ocellata sensu stricto going to be a super difficult species to see presumably. And maybe critically endangered?
James
It was not especially uncommon in suitable areas in central Vietnam when I first visited, and much more accessible than Crested Argus s.l. In Malaysia, but I believe it has undergone a serious decline in the last couple of decades. Probably safe to say that both taxa are now super difficult. Whether the Indochinese birds meet the criteria for CE, I don't know, but not a good place to be a large edible bird.
DMW is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Monday 29th June 2020, 09:07   #39
Peter Kovalik
Registered User
 
Peter Kovalik's Avatar

 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Sp. Hrhov
Posts: 3,240
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter Kovalik View Post
G. W. H. Davison, Peter Boesman, N. J. Collar, C. L. Puan. Species rank for Rheinardia ocellata nigrescens (Phasianidae). Bulletin of the British Ornithologists’ Club, 140(2):182-194 (2020). https://doi.org/10.25226/bboc.v140i2.2020.a9

Abstract:

Crested Argus Rheinardia ocellata has two highly disjunct populations in Vietnam and Lao PDR (nominate ocellata) and Malaysia (subspecies nigrescens). When evidence from the small sample of museum specimens is supplemented by novel photographic and acoustic evidence, Malaysian nigrescens proves to be distinct on a suite of characters: yellower bill with blackish nares, buffier supercilium, throat and breast, different-coloured and -structured crest, different-patterned upperparts and tail, a purer, more fluent, longer, lower Short Call (used by advertising males), markedly divergent from the explosive, nasal, double-noted equivalent in nominate ocellata, and a higher number of loud notes in the Long Call including an unexplained bimodal vs. unimodal pattern (hence either average 8.6 or 14.5 vs. 7.1 loud notes per call). In combination these characters indicate a level of differentiation compatible with species rank for nigrescens, and this is strongly reflected in Tobias criteria scoring. The conservation of the two forms requires urgent reconsideration.

[full article]
IOC Updates Diary June 28

Accept split of Malaysian Crested Argus Rheinardia nigrescens from Vietnamese Crested Argus Rheinardia ocellata.
Peter Kovalik is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Today, 20:30   #40
LeNomenclatoriste
Taxonomy and zoological nomenclature
 
LeNomenclatoriste's Avatar

 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: France
Posts: 920
Peter A. Hosner Hannah L. Owens Edward L. Braun Rebecca T. Kimball (2020)
Phylogeny and diversification of the gallopheasants (Aves: Galliformes): Testing roles of sexual selection and environmental niche divergence
Abstract
The gallopheasants comprise a clade of 22 species including some of the most elaborately plumaged and highly ornamented birds in the world. They also occupy a remarkable breath of environments and habitats, ranging from lowland rainforests to high grasslands and steppes of the Tibetan plateau. Here, we provide the first well‐resolved species phylogeny of this charismatic group, inferred from ultraconserved elements, nuclear introns and mitochondrial DNA sequences. Unlike previous studies which found unresolvable relationships and suggested a rapid initial burst of diversification, we identified a well‐resolved phylogeny supported in both concatenated and coalescent analytical frameworks, and a steady accrual of lineages through time. Morphological trait reconstructions demonstrated strong phylogenetic signal, not only for highly ornamented males, but also in more cryptically plumaged females. Environmental niche similarly exhibited strong phylogenetic signal. Moreover, evolution of male traits, female traits and environmental niche were all significantly correlated, making it difficult to disentangle their individual roles in gallopheasant diversification

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/...1111/zsc.12441
LeNomenclatoriste is offline  
Reply With Quote
Advertisement
Reply


Thread Tools
Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

{googleads}

Fatbirder's Top 1000 Birding Websites

Help support BirdForum

Page generated in 0.18343902 seconds with 28 queries
All times are GMT. The time now is 23:27.